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What is the most efficient way to read a big text file backwards, line by line, using Windows API functions? For example, if a file is:

line 1
...
line 108777
line 108778

the output should be:

line 108778
line 108777
...
line 1

I want to write a C program for this. You don't need to write a code (but if you want, that's great), I am just interested in how to do this having in mind that files are big and that I want program to run as fast as it can.

Also, I am interested in which Windows API functions to use.

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Without forward indexing the file, I think this would be tricky in the case of multibyte encodings. –  spender Jul 15 '10 at 11:32
    
I don't think there are any multibyte encodings where '\n' can appear as part of another character, so synchronization on '\n' should be fine. Of course I wouldn't bother to support any of the insane multibyte encodings whether one character can be a substring of another character, only UTF8. –  R.. Jul 15 '10 at 11:54
    
Is there a reason for using Windows API rather than the facilities of the language? This can be performed without using Windows API functions. –  Thomas Matthews Jul 15 '10 at 17:17
    
@Thomas: Yes, I must do this using windows API... Sad, but true –  Matthew Murdock Jul 17 '10 at 12:28

5 Answers 5

A more clever solution is to open the file, set the file-offset to the (end of the file - buffersize) and read (buffersize) bytes, u can parse the data in the buffer from back to front to find newlines and do whatever you want, and so on.

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If performance is more important than memory utilization, I'd just do a buffered read of the entire text file into memory and then parse it in whatever order you like.

Take a look at memory mapped files, some advantages of which are discussed here.

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Memory mapped files will fail (or at least become very tricky) if the file's bigger than the available address space. Instead, try this:

input = input file
block_prefix = unique temporary file
block_index = 0

while (!eof (input))
{
   line = input.readline ();
   push line onto a stack

   if (stack > 100 entries) // doesn't have to be 100
   {
      output = block_prefix + block_index++

      while (stack has entries)
      {
        pop line off stack
        write to output
      }
   }
}

if (stack has entries)
{
  output = block_prefix + block_index++

  while (stack has entries)
  {
    pop line off stack
    write to output
  }
}

output = output file

while (block_index)
{
   read entire contents of block file (block_prefix + --block_index)
   write contents to output
   delete block file
}
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One method is to use a container of file offsets to the beginning of each line. After parsing the file, process the container in reverse order. See fgetc, fgets and fseek.

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+1. Scan the file once and put each end-of-line position on a stack. Then get into a loop of popping of file position pointers off the stack and seek to that position. Print all the characters between that stack value and the previous one. –  selbie Jul 16 '10 at 0:54
    
Sorry, but I must use Windows API for this... –  Matthew Murdock Jul 20 '10 at 10:16

Memory-map the file. It will be automatically buffered for you - just read it as if it was memory, starting from the tail and looking for CRs / LFs / CRLFs.

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