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What does the & before the function name signify?

Does that mean that the $result is returned by reference rather than by value? If yes then is it correct? As I remember you cannot return a reference to a local variable as it vanishes once the function exits.

function &query($sql) {
 // ...
 $result = mysql_query($sql);
 return $result;
}

Also where does such a syntax get used in practice ?

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3 Answers

Does that mean that the $result is returned by reference rather than by value?

Yes.

Also where does such a syntax get used in practice ?

This is more prevalent in PHP 4 scripts where objects were passed around by value by default.

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-1 for stating $result would only exist within the function and would therefore be useless. –  NikiC Jul 15 '10 at 12:48
2  
@nikic: do you have any support for your claim that objects in php5 are passed by value? –  Dennis Haarbrink Jul 15 '10 at 12:54
1  
@nikic: I don't think that proves that objects are passed by value. If you set a local variable to a new value, it's not the same object. You'd have to write a function that modifies an object of some mutable type and show that the value passed in was not changed externally to prove that the parameter was passed by value (copied). –  Dan Tao Jul 15 '10 at 13:10
1  
@nikic: your example is a bit convoluted since you are intermingling object and string datatypes. a correct example would be: $a = new stdClass; $a->prop='foo'; function test($b){ $b->prop = 'bar'; } test($a); echo $a->prop; As you can see, the object is passed by-ref :) –  Dennis Haarbrink Jul 15 '10 at 13:10
1  
What PHP calls "objects" are always passed by value unless otherwise noted. The difference between PHP4 and PHP5 is that in PHP5 you pass around references to the objects. –  Artefacto Jul 15 '10 at 14:23
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To answer the second part of your question, here a place there I had to use it: Magic getters!

class FooBar {
    private $properties = array();

    public function &__get($name) {
        return $this->properties[$name];
    }

     public function __set($name, $value) {
        $this->properties[$name] = $value;
    }
}

If I hadn't used & there, this wouldn't be possible:

$foobar = new FooBar;
$foobar->subArray = array();
$foobar->subArray['FooBar'] = 'Hallo World!';

Instead PHP would thrown an error saying something like 'cannot indirectly modify overloaded property'.

Okay, this is probably only a hack to get round some maldesign in PHP, but it's still useful.

But honestly, I can't think right now of another example. But I bet there are some rare use cases...

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Does that mean that the $result is returned by reference rather than by value?

No. The difference is that it can be returned by reference. For instance:

<?php
function &a(&$c) {
    return $c;
}
$c = 1;
$d = a($c);
$d++;
echo $c; //echoes 1, not 2!

To return by reference you'd have to do:

<?php
function &a(&$c) {
    return $c;
}
$c = 1;
$d = &a($c);
$d++;
echo $c; //echoes 2

Also where does such a syntax get used in practice ?

In practice, you use whenever you want the caller of your function to manipulate data that is owned by the callee without telling him. This is rarely used because it's a violation of encapsulation – you could set the returned reference to any value you want; the callee won't be able to validate it.

nikic gives a great example of when this is used in practice.

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If the function is not defined with a & before the name of the function, can you still return the variable with reference instead of value? –  Koray Tugay Feb 9 '13 at 19:38
    
@KorayTugay no. –  Artefacto Feb 9 '13 at 20:16
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