Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with a large code base which uses const strings in structure initializers. I'm trying to translate these strings via GNU gettext with a minimal amount of time. Is there some sort of conversion operator I can add to default_value which will allow Case #1 to work?

#include <cstring>

template<int N> struct fixed_string
{
    char text[N];
};

// Case #1
struct data1
{
    char string[50];
};

// Case #2
struct data2
{
    const char* string;
};

// Case #3
struct data3
{
    fixed_string<50> string;
};

// A conversion helper
struct default_value
{
    const char* text;
    default_value(const char* t): text(t) {}

    operator const char*() const
    {
        return text;
    }

    template<int M> operator fixed_string<M>() const
    {
        fixed_string<M> ret;
        std::strncpy(ret.text, text, M);
        ret.text[M - 1] = 0;
        return ret;
    }
};

// The translation function
const char* translate(const char* text) {return "TheTranslation";}

int main()
{
    data1 d1 = {default_value(translate("Hello"))}; // Broken
    data2 d2 = {default_value(translate("Hello"))}; // Works
    data3 d3 = {default_value(translate("Hello"))}; // Works
}
share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason why you don't use std::string to store your strings ? –  ereOn Jul 15 '10 at 13:48
    
I would love to use std::string! Unfortunately, this is legacy C code - 200,000 lines of it. The structure bytes are also transmitted over the network as-is, so only POD is allowed unless we do a major rewrite of the entire system. Unfortunately this is not an option right now. –  Dark Falcon Jul 15 '10 at 13:53
    
@bshields: any particular reason why you removed the c++ tag. The code presented in the example is clearly C++. –  Jens Gustedt Jul 15 '10 at 14:37
    
Also, the code presented in the example is decidedly not C. You might get better results turning the c tag into a c++ one. –  nmichaels Jul 15 '10 at 14:53
    
@Jens Gustedt sorry changed it back. –  bshields Jul 15 '10 at 15:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about direct conversion to data1?

..
operator data1() const
{
    data1 ret;
    std::strncpy(ret.string, text, sizeof(ret.string));
    ret.string[sizeof(ret.string)] = 0;
    return ret;
}
..

and then:

..
    data1 d1 = default_value(translate("Hello")); // should work now...
..
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea! Problem is that I have other members in the structure besides strings. The code above is just a test case. The actual structures often have over 100 members: strings, floats, doubles, enum values, etc. By using fixed_string, I am able to write a conversion, but then I also have to go update all the arrays to be fixed_string instead. I can do this, but I'm looking for a better option first. –  Dark Falcon Jul 15 '10 at 14:33
    
I opted to go with case #3. There were fewer static-sized arrays than I anticipated, and few side effects from changing them to use the template class instead. –  Dark Falcon Jul 15 '10 at 17:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.