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There seems to be a lot of enthusiasm among Scala bloggers lately for the type classes pattern, in which a simple class has functionality added to it by an additional class conforming to some trait or pattern. As a vastly oversimplified example, the simple class:

case class Wotsit (value: Int)

can be adapted to the Foo trait:

trait Foo[T] {
  def write (t: T): Unit
}

with the help of this type class:

implicit object WotsitIsFoo extends Foo[Wotsit] {
  def write (wotsit: Wotsit) = println(wotsit.value)
}

The type class is typically captured at compile time with implicts, allowing both the Wotsit and its type class to be passed together into a higher order function:

def writeAll[T] (items: List[T])(implicit tc: Foo[T]) =
  items.foreach(w => tc.write(w))

writeAll(wotsits)

(before you correct me, I said it was an oversimplified example)

However, the use of implicits assumes that the precise type of the items is known at compile time. I find in my code this often isn't the case: I will have a list of some type of item List[T], and need to discover the correct type class to work on them.

The suggested approach of Scala would appear to be to add the typeclass argument at all points in the call hierarchy. This can get annoying as an the code scales and these dependencies need to be passed down increasingly long chains, through methods to which they are increasingly irrelevant. This makes the code cluttered and harder to maintain, the opposite of what Scala is for.

Typically this is where dependency injection would step in, using a library to supply the desired object at the point it's needed. Details vary with the library chosen for DI - I've written my own in Java in the past - but typically the point of injection needs to define precisely the object desired.

Trouble is, in the case of a type class the precise value isn't known at compile time. It must be selected based on a polymorphic description. And crucially, the type information has been erased by the compiler. Manifests are Scala's solution to type erasure, but it's far from clear to me how to use them to address this issue.

What techniques and dependency injection libraries for Scala would people suggest as a way of tackling this? Am I missing a trick? The perfect DI library? Or is this really the sticking point it seems?


Clarification

I think there are really two aspects to this. In the first case, the point where the type class is needed is reached by direct function calls from the point where the exact type of its operand is known, and so sufficient type wrangling and syntactic sugar can allow the type class to be passed to the point it's needed.

In the second case, the two points are separated by a barrier - such as an API that can't be altered, or being stored in a database or object store, or serialised and send to another computer - that means the type class can't be passed along with its operand. In this case, given an object whose type and value are known only at runtime, the type class needs somehow to be discovered.

I think functional programmers have a habit of assuming the first case - that with a sufficiently advanced language, the type of the operand will always be knowable. David and mkniessl provided good answers for this, and I certainly don't want to criticise those. But the second case definitely does exist, and that's why I brought dependency injection into the question.

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5  
This is really just an issue with lack of inference. For example, in Haskell which has better inference, the type of 4 is forAll a. (Num a) => a. In Scala terms, that would be [A](implicit e: Num[A])A. Scala currently has no way of introducing type variables automatically like that, or discovering that a particular type class is required implicitly. It's my understanding that Scala's subtyping makes this problem either very difficult or intractable. This makes typeclasses considerably less user-friendly in Scala than Haskell, but they're still better than the alternatives. –  Apocalisp Jul 15 '10 at 23:49
    
I don't know Haskell to argue that, but unless Scala's rules change in a future version it doesn't really help me. –  Marcus Downing Jul 17 '10 at 12:33
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2 Answers 2

A fair amount of the tediousness of passing down those implicit dependencies can be alleviated by using the new context bound syntax. Your example becomes

def writeAll[T:Foo] (items: List[T]) =
  items.foreach(w => implicitly[Foo[T]].write(w))

which compiles identically but makes for nice and clear signatures and has fewer "noise" variables floating around.

Not a great answer, but the alternatives probably involve reflection, and I don't know of any library that will just make this automatically work.

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That's helpful as an anaesthetic, even if it doesn't cure anything :) –  Marcus Downing Jul 15 '10 at 15:36
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(I have substituted the names in the question, they did not help me think about the problem)

I'll attack the problem in two steps. First I show how nested scopes avoid having to declare the type class parameter all the way down its usage. Then I'll show a variant, where the type class instance is "dependency injected".

Type class instance as class parameter

To avoid having to declare the type class instance as implicit parameter in all intermediate calls, you can declare the type class instance in a class defining a scope where the specific type class instance should be available. I'm using the shortcut syntax ("context bound") for the definition of the class parameter.

object TypeClassDI1 {

  // The type class
  trait ATypeClass[T] {
    def typeClassMethod(t: T): Unit
  }

  // Some data type
  case class Something (value: Int)

  // The type class instance as implicit
  implicit object SomethingInstance extends ATypeClass[Something] {
    def typeClassMethod(s: Something): Unit =
      println("SomthingInstance " + s.value)
  }

  // A method directly using the type class
  def writeAll[T:ATypeClass](items: List[T]) =
    items.foreach(w => implicitly[ATypeClass[T]].typeClassMethod(w))

  // A class defining a scope with a type class instance known to be available    
  class ATypeClassUser[T:ATypeClass] {

    // bar only indirectly uses the type class via writeAll
    // and does not declare an implicit parameter for it.
    def bar(items: List[T]) {
      // (here the evidence class parameter defined 
      // with the context bound is used for writeAll)
      writeAll(items)
    }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val aTypeClassUser = new ATypeClassUser[Something]
    aTypeClassUser.bar(List(Something(42), Something(4711)))
  }
}

Type class instance as writable field (setter injection)

A variant of the above which would be usable using setter injection. This time the type class instance is passed via a setter call to the bean using the type class.

object TypeClassDI2 {

  // The type class
  trait ATypeClass[T] {
    def typeClassMethod(t: T): Unit
  }

  // Some data type
  case class Something (value: Int)

  // The type class instance (not implicit here)
  object SomethingInstance extends ATypeClass[Something] {
    def typeClassMethod(s: Something): Unit =
      println("SomthingInstance " + s.value)
  }

  // A method directly using the type class
  def writeAll[T:ATypeClass](items: List[T]) =
    items.foreach(w => implicitly[ATypeClass[T]].typeClassMethod(w))

  // A "service bean" class defining a scope with a type class instance.
  // Setter based injection style for simplicity.
  class ATypeClassBean[T] {
    implicit var aTypeClassInstance: ATypeClass[T] = _

    // bar only indirectly uses the type class via writeAll
    // and does not declare an implicit parameter for it.
    def bar(items: List[T]) {
      // (here the implicit var is used for writeAll)
      writeAll(items)
    }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val aTypeClassBean = new ATypeClassBean[Something]()

    // "inject" the type class instance
    aTypeClassBean.aTypeClassInstance = SomethingInstance

    aTypeClassBean.bar(List(Something(42), Something(4711)))
  }
}

Note that the second solution has the common flaw of setter based injection that you can forget to set the dependency and get a nice NullPointerException upon use...

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I'm going to have to try this before I entirely follow, but thanks. –  Marcus Downing Jul 16 '10 at 8:52
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