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How can I create a Primary Key in SQL Server 2005/2008 with the format: CurrentYear + auto-increment?

Example: The current year is 2010, in a new table, the ID should start in 1, so: 20101, 20102, 20103, 20104, 20105... and so on.

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Sequence + Trigger –  BenV Jul 15 '10 at 14:34
    
Can't you simply set the identity seed starting value to 20100? –  Kane Jul 15 '10 at 14:35
    
@Kane But this way after 20109, it will sum to 20110! –  BrunoSalvino Jul 15 '10 at 14:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This technically meets the needs of what you requested:

CREATE TABLE #test
        ( seeded_column INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL
        , year_column INT NOT NULL DEFAULT(YEAR(GETDATE()))
        , calculated_column AS CONVERT(BIGINT, CONVERT(CHAR(4), year_column, 120) + CONVERT(VARCHAR(MAX), seeded_column)) PERSISTED PRIMARY KEY
        , test VARCHAR(MAX) NOT NULL);

INSERT INTO #test (test)
SELECT 'Badda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Cadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Dadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Fadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Gadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Hadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Jadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Kadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Ladda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Madda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Nadda'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Padda';

SELECT *
FROM #test;

DROP TABLE #test;
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Is this the implementation of the solution proposed by @Pontus Gagge? –  BrunoSalvino Jul 15 '10 at 15:06
    
No. @Pontus Gagge suggests created a composite index on two columns instead of a calculated column derived from two columns. –  Registered User Jul 15 '10 at 15:12
    
Not quite, but an interesting alternative if you really want to materialize your YEAR+COUNTER keys directly. I'd carefully investigate whether SQL Server is as efficient in handling calculated columns as primary keys as with composite keys. My gut feeling is that you're going to take a significant performance hit. –  Pontus Gagge Jul 15 '10 at 15:12
1  
After rereading @Pontus Gagge I see that this is exactly what he recommended. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Registered User Jul 15 '10 at 17:55
1  
Note this will not work if you want the first record of 2011 to start over again at 1. –  HLGEM Jul 15 '10 at 18:51

The cleaner solution is to create a composite primary key consisting of e.g. Year and Counter columns.

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1  
+1 for keeping types separate, although it's not clear to me why including the year is necessary in the first place. –  Justin K Jul 15 '10 at 14:49
    
My assumption is that the keys are going to be visible to end users (such as a order numbering scheme). Otherwise, I'd recommend a purely synthetic key. –  Pontus Gagge Jul 15 '10 at 15:13

Not sure exactly what you are trying to accomplish by doing that, but it makes a lot more sense to do this with two fields.

If the combination of the two must be the PK for some reason, just span it across both columns. However, it seems unnecessary since the identity part will be unique exclusive of the year.

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You have to write a trigger for this :)

Have a separate table for storing the last digit used (I really don't know whether there is something similar to sequences in Oracle in SQL Server).

OR

You can get the last item inserted item and extract the last number of it.

THEN

You can get the current year from SELECT DATEPART(yyyy,GetDate());

The trigger would be a ON INSERT trigger where you combine the year and the last digit and update the column

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