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I would like to create a junit test suite using JUnit 4 where the names of the test classes to be included are not known until the test suite is run.

In JUnit 3 I could do this:

public final class MasterTester extends TestCase
{
  /**
   * Used by junit to specify what TestCases to run.
   * 
   * @return a suite containing what TestCases to run
   */
  public static TestSuite suite() {
    TestSuite suite = new TestSuite();

    for(Class<?> klass : gatherTestClasses()) {
      suite.addTestSuite(klass);
    }

    return suite;
  }
}

and let the gatherTestClasses() method deal with figuring out what test classes to run.

In JUnit 4, the documentation says to use an annotation: @SuiteClasses({TestClass1.class, TestClass2.class...}) to build up my test suite. There are numerous SO answers showing how to do this. Unfortunately the examples I see do not seem to allow for passing a dynamically generated list of TestClasses.

This SO answer suggested I would have to subclass BlockJUnit4ClassRunner which I do not want to do.

Dynamically specified test suites seem like something that must be in JUnit 4 somewhere. Does anyone know where?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I found Classpath suite quite useful when used with a naming convention on my test classes.

http://johanneslink.net/projects/cpsuite.jsp

Here is an example:

import org.junit.extensions.cpsuite.ClasspathSuite;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;

@RunWith(ClasspathSuite.class)
@ClassnameFilters({".*UnitTest"})
public class MySuite {
}
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Awesome! Thank you! –  Tom Tresansky Jul 26 '10 at 12:20
4  
Andrejs's answer makes Classpath redundant, at least for the task of creating test suites dynamically. –  Oleg Mikheev Sep 30 '12 at 20:44
    
It helped me too.thanks. –  user153 Jul 10 at 9:16

I've tried this using JUnit 4.8 and it works:

@RunWith(AllTests.class)
public class SomeTests
{
    public static TestSuite suite()
    {
        TestSuite suite = new TestSuite();

        suite.addTest(new JUnit4TestAdapter(Test1.class));
        suite.addTest(new JUnit4TestAdapter(Test2.class));

        return suite;
     }
}
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1  
What do I do with this method? I want the suite be become a child of my parent suite stackoverflow.com/questions/18834908 –  Val Sep 17 '13 at 14:48
    
I tried that but when I add @BeforeClass annotation it, the code inside @BeforeClass doesn't work. Any idea? –  Gokhan Arik Jul 2 at 20:46

To create a dynamic test suite, you need to use the @RunWith annotation. There are two common ways to use it:

@RunWith(Suite.class)

This allows you to specify, which classes compose the test suite in question. This is equivalent to the JUnit 3 style:

import junit.framework.TestSuite;
import junit.framework.TestCase;

public final class MasterTester extends TestCase {

  public static TestSuite suite() {
    TestSuite suite = new TestSuite();
    suite.addTestSuite(TestClass1.class);        
    suite.addTestSuite(TestClass2.class);
    // etc...
    return suite;
  }
}

The equivalent JUnit 4 class will be:

import org.junit.runners.Suite;

@RunWith(Suite.class)
@SuiteClasses({TestClass1.class, TestClass2.class})
public final class MasterTester {

}

@RunWith(AllTests.class)

This allows you to dynamically specify the tests, which compose the test suite. If your tests are not known until runtime, you cannot specify them in the annotations. You can use this construction instead. So, if the JUnit 3 code is:

import junit.framework.TestCase;
import junit.framework.TestSuite;
import junit.framework.Test;

public final class MasterTester extends TestCase {

  public static TestSuite suite() {
    TestSuite suite = new TestSuite();
    for (Test test : findAllTestCasesRuntime()) {
      suite.addTest(test);
    }
    return suite;
  }
}

The equivalent JUnit 4 code will be:

import org.junit.runners.AllTests;
import junit.framework.TestSuite;
import junit.framework.Test;

@RunWith(AllTests.class)
public final class MasterTester {

  public static TestSuite suite() {
    TestSuite suite = new TestSuite();
    for (Test test : findAllTestCasesRuntime()) {
      suite.addTest(test);
    }
    return suite;
  }
}
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The action inside this for loop seems wrong. Do you mean to do suite.addTest(test); ? –  Ben McCann Sep 23 '12 at 23:21
    
Thanks for pointing out. I've updated the sources to use addTest() and addTestSuite() –  Danail Nachev Sep 24 '12 at 11:10
    
why are you making a new TestCase()? shouldn't you add the test that you found? –  Ben McCann Sep 24 '12 at 15:44
    
Of course :) Corrected. –  Danail Nachev Oct 1 '12 at 13:48
    
And what would a Test class be? What class should I extend? –  Peterdk Sep 9 '13 at 13:39

I'm not sure what gatherTestClasses() does, but let's say it returns some tests when the OS is Linux and different tests when the OS is Windows. You can replicate that in JUnit 4.4 with assumptions:

@Test
public void onlyOnLinux() {
    assumeThat(getOS(), is(OperatingSystem.LINUX));
    // rest of test
}

@Test
public void onlyOnWindows() {
    assumeThat(getOS(), is(OperatingSystem.WINDOWS));
    // rest of test
}

@Test
public void anyOperatingSystem() {
    // just don't call assumeThat(..)
}

The implementation of getOS() and OperatingSystem being your custom code.

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2  
Perfect, just what I was looking for. If you're using apache commons-lang, you can use "assumeTrue(SystemUtils.IS_OS_WINDOWS);" –  Jason Day Jun 15 '12 at 17:05

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