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How does one convert between System.Drawing.Icon type and byte[]? I'm looking for something simple that can (hopefully) work in .NET2.

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3 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You go via a MemoryStream, basically:

public static byte[] IconToBytes(Icon icon)
{
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        icon.Save(ms);
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}

public static Icon BytesToIcon(byte[] bytes)
{
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(bytes))
    {
        return new Icon(ms);
    }
}

(Historical note: I wasn't sure whether or not it was safe to dispose of the stream passed to the constructor. It isn't safe to do so for Bitmap, for example... that holds on to the stream and may read from it later. Apparently it's okay for Icon though. I wish MSDN made this clearer...)

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It's worth pointing out that the bytes "saved" here are the exact same as the bytes written to a file (so it includes file header, any applicable compression, etc) not the bytes of the image itself. –  Neil N Jul 15 '10 at 16:53
    
Yes, you could make it a bitmap and extract the array of pixels if you need to. –  Lasse Espeholt Jul 15 '10 at 16:56
    
Just curious, you wrapped MemoryStream neatly in a using-block, why didn't you do equally so in the reverse BytesToIcon method? No need to dispose the ms anymore? –  Abel Jul 15 '10 at 16:56
    
I can verify that Icon reads the stream as soon as it's constructed. –  BC. Jul 15 '10 at 16:58
    
@BC: Thanks - duly wrapped in a using statement now :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 15 '10 at 17:42
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See: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharpgeneral/thread/1551fd3b-02b6-4479-852a-dfea4b610c35

Ex (there are multiple ways)

private byte[] GetBytes( Icon icon )
{
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    icon.Save( ms );
    return ms.ToArray();
}

And:

Bitmap bmpIcon = icon.ToBitmap();

using (System.IO.MemoryStream ms = new System.IO.MemoryStream())
{
    bmpIcon.Save(ms, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);        
    return ms.ToArray();
}
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1  
No, don't call GetBuffer - that may well have extraneous 0s at the end. ToArray is the right call to use. –  Jon Skeet Jul 15 '10 at 16:52
    
Thanks, noted. I really just copied stuff from the link. There are multiple solutions in it. 20 secs on Google :) –  Lasse Espeholt Jul 15 '10 at 16:55
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... And back again

public static Icon IconFromBytes(byte[] bytes) {
     using(var ms = new MemoryStream(bytes)) {
          return new Icon(ms);
     }
}

The Icon class reads from the stream as soon as it's constructed. No harm in closing MS.

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+1 for using using :) –  Abel Jul 15 '10 at 16:58
    
-1 for not understanding what Dispose() does. –  Hans Passant Jul 15 '10 at 17:26
    
Care to elaborate? I agree that MemoryStream doesn't need a disposal because it doesn't have unmanaged resources... but it reinforces the whole idea of calling dispose when IDisposable is implemented. –  BC. Jul 15 '10 at 17:39
    
@Hans Passant: not sure what you mean, but perhaps you mean to ask what Dispose does? If a class implements IDisposable, it is close to mandatory to wrap it in a using-block. Due to the the lack of multiple inheritance in .NET, certain classes implement IDisposable while they technically wouldn't need to. MemoryStream is a class that implements unmanaged code (WaitHandle) and requires that you use using or try/finally. It is applied correctly here. In cases where it isn't needed (some implementations of IComponent come to mind), it is often still best to use using for clarity. –  Abel Jul 15 '10 at 18:26
    
PS: if you need an example, see how Jon Skeet corrected his own code after my comment on Dispose. –  Abel Jul 15 '10 at 18:26
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