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I'm working on a realtime media browsing/playback application that uses <video> objects in the browser for playback, when available.

I'm using a mix of straight javascript, and jQuery,

My concern is specifically with memory. The application never reloads in the window, and the user can watch many videos, so memory management becomes a large concern over time. In testing today, I see the memory profile jumping by the size of the video to be streamed with each subsequent load, and never dropping back down to the baseline.

I've tried the following things with the same result:

1 - Empty the parent container containing the created element, eg:

$(container_selector).empty();

2 - Pause and remove children matching 'video', and then empty the parent container:

$(container_selector).children().filter("video").each(function(){
    this.pause();
    $(this).remove();
});
$(container_selector).empty();

Has anyone else run into this issue, and is there a better way to do this?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This "solution" is reported to work, presumably because it would make those video container objects available for garbage collection (see the note below for a discussion of why delete shouldn't be making a difference). In any case, your results are likely to vary by browser:

$(container_selector).children().filter("video").each(function(){
    this.pause(); // can't hurt
    delete this; // @sparkey reports that this did the trick (even though it makes no sense!)
    $(this).remove(); // this is probably what actually does the trick
});
$(container_selector).empty();

Note: There's no doubt that the delete keyword is specified only to remove properties from objects (as others have pointed out in the comments). Logging this to the console both before and after the delete this line, above, shows the same result each time. delete this should do nothing and make no difference. Yet this answer continues to receive a trickle of votes, and people have reported that omitting delete this makes it stop working. Perhaps there's strangeness in how some browser JS engines implement delete, or an unusual interaction between a browser's delete and what jQuery is doing with this.

So, just be aware, if this answer solves your problem, that if it does work, it's not clear why that's the case, and it's just as likely to stop working for any number of reasons.

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I'll give this a shot -- thanks! –  sparkey0 Jul 15 '10 at 19:45
    
Okay, so you put me on the right track -- this = null; did not work, but delete(this); did! –  sparkey0 Jul 15 '10 at 19:48
    
Glad to hear it. I'll update the answer to include your findings. –  Ken Redler Jul 15 '10 at 19:59
    
Thanks again! Btw, this=null threw an error -- should be avoided. –  sparkey0 Jul 15 '10 at 20:13
4  
The delete statement simply won't do anything because it only deletes properties. It would be exactly the same, I believe, if it were removed. –  Casey Chu Jul 15 '10 at 20:15

It is very tricky to dispose video from the DOM structure. It may lead to browser crashing. Here is the solution that helped me in my project.

var videoElement = document.getElementById('id_of_the_video_element_here');
videoElement.pause();
videoElement.src =""; // empty source
videoElement.load();

Here is the full details and better explanation http://www.attuts.com/aw-snap-solution-video-tag-dispose-method/

Hope it resolve your query.

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To reset the video to Blank without removing it

$("#video-intro").first().attr('src','')

It stops the video

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Just to clarify for anyone trying this later, the solution was this: (confirmed with h264 videos in Safari 5.0, untested in FF/opera yet)

$(container_selector).children().filter("video").each(function(){
    this.pause();
    delete(this);
    $(this).remove();
});
$(container_selector).empty();
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ok, here's a simple solution which certainly works:

var bodypage = document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0];
var control_to_remove = document.getElementById('id_of_the_element_here');
bodypage.removeChild(control_to_remove);
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delete(this); 

is not a solution. If it worked for x or y it is a browser misbehaviour. Read here:

The delete operator removes a property from an object.

The truth is that some browsers (Firefox for example) will cache in memory the video buffer when autoplay property is on. It is a pain to deal with.

Removing the video tag from the DOM or pausing it can only produce unstable results. You have to unload the buffer.

var video = document.getElementById('video-id');
video.src = "";

My experiment shows that it is done as so but unfortunately this is browser implementation not completely specified by the spec. You do not need to call load() after src change. When changing the src of a video tag you implicitly call a load() on it, this is stated in the W3C spec.

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Here is an answer on how to close the camera - not only pausing. It is the stream that should be stopped - not the video elements reference: stream.stop()

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