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I've got an executable file, and I would like to know which versions of the .NET framework this file needs to be started.

Is there an easy way to find this information somewhere?

(So far I tried ILDASM and DUMPBIN without any luck.)

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See also stackoverflow.com/questions/3460982/… –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 22 '11 at 9:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 38 down vote accepted

I think the closest you can reliably get is to determine what version of the CLR is required. You can do this by using ILDASM and looking at the "MANIFEST" node or Reflector and looking at the dissasembly view of the "Application.exe" node as IL. In both cases there is a comment that indicates the CLR version. In ILDASM, the comment is "// Metadata version" and in Reflector the comment is "Target Runtime Version".

Here are examples for a .NET WinForms application named WindowsFormsApplication1.exe:

ILDASM:

// Metadata version: v2.0.50727
.assembly extern mscorlib
{
  .publickeytoken = (B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89 )                         // .z\V.4..
  .ver 2:0:0:0
}
.assembly extern System
{
  .publickeytoken = (B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89 )                         // .z\V.4..
  .ver 2:0:0:0
}

Reflector:

.module WindowsFormsApplication1.exe
.subsystem 0x0002
// MVID: {CA3D2090-16C5-4899-953E-4736D6BC0FA8}
// Target Runtime Version: v2.0.50727

You can also look at the list of referenced assemblies and look for the reference with the highest version number.

Again, using ILDASM looking at the "MANIFEST" node data:

.assembly extern System.Drawing
{
  .publickeytoken = (B0 3F 5F 7F 11 D5 0A 3A )                         // .?_....:
  .ver 2:0:0:0
}
.assembly extern System.Core
{
  .publickeytoken = (B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89 )                         // .z\V.4..
  .ver 3:5:0:0
}

And using Reflector, looking at the dissambly (still as IL) for each reference listed:

.assembly extern System.Core
{
    .ver 3:5:0:0
    .publickeytoken = (B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89)
}

By finding the reference with the highest version metadata you can determine what version of the Framework that reference came from, which would indicate that you need the same version of the Framework installed for the application to run. That being said, I wouldn't treat this as 100% reliable, but I don't think it will change any time soon.

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2  
Unfortunately Microsoft introduces a breaking change for the above technique. .NET 4.5 assemblies cannot run on raw .NET 4, and to tell a .NET 4.5 assembly you need to also read System.Runtime.Versioning.TargetFrameworkAttribute. lextm.com/2013/02/how-to-tell-net-45-only-assemblies.html –  Lex Li Apr 14 '13 at 3:34

From code you can use Assembly.ImageRuntimeVersion but by looking at the file probably the best thing to do would be to use reflector and see which version of mscorlib is being referenced.

Edit: Even better would be to use ildasm, open your assembly and then view the manifest for the assembly. The first line of the manifest will tell you the exact version of CLR that the assembly was built for.

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A more simplified approach would be to use dotPeek and see what shows up in the tree.

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Very nice tool, just what I needed! –  Surfbutler Jul 29 at 14:26

You can use a tool called CorFlags.exe. It has been around since .NET 2.0, and I know for sure that it is included in the Windows SDK 7.0. By default (on Windows XP Pro) it is installed to C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\bin\CorFlags.exe. Provide it with the file path to a managed module (without any other command-line flags) to display its header information, which includes the version.

Keep in mind that this utility is designed to modify the PE32 header of a module, so don't use any of the flags until you read the documentation carefully.

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Cannot distinguish between .Net4 and .Net4.5 –  mheyman Feb 27 at 13:11

You can now use ILSpy to examine the target framework of an assembly. After loading the assembly, click on the root of the assembly node, and you can find the information under the TargetFramework declaration:

[assembly: TargetFramework(".NETFramework,Version=v4.5", FrameworkDisplayName = ".NET Framework 4.5")]
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Mono has a utility monop2 that you can use:

monop2 --runtime-version test.exe

output:

runtime version: 2.0.50727.1433
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1  
I think it prints out current used runtime - monop and monop2 prints runtime version: 4.0.30319.1 and runtime version: 2.0.50727.1433 no matter what file I specify. –  Curvian Vynes Jan 3 at 20:52
    
Oops. That seems right –  sehe Jan 3 at 20:59

Or you can just find out which reference of System.Core it has. That will tell you the .NET Framework version this app is using. For 2.0 the version of System.Core will be 2.0.xxx.xxx. For 3.5 the version will be 3.5.xxx.xxx, etc.

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