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Given two date ranges, what is the simplest or most efficient way to determine whether the two date ranges overlap?

As an example, suppose we have ranges denoted by DateTime variables StartDate1 to EndDate1 and StartDate2 to EndDate2.

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6  
Define "overlap". –  Tomalak Nov 28 '08 at 14:52
2  
Extremely similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/306316/… –  Charles Bretana Nov 28 '08 at 14:54
1  
very similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/117962/… –  Steven A. Lowe Nov 28 '08 at 16:35
2  
The question and the answers are great –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Aug 29 '12 at 16:16
1  
Divide the situation 'the two date ranges intersect' into cases (there are two) then test for each case. –  Colonel Panic Oct 12 '12 at 23:14

18 Answers 18

up vote 665 down vote accepted

Let ConditionA Mean DateRange A Completely After DateRange B (True if StartA > EndB)

Let ConditionB Mean DateRange A Completely Before DateRange B (True if EndA < StartB)

Then Overlap exists if Neither A Nor B is true ( If one range is neither completely after the other, nor completely before the other, then they must overlap)

Now deMorgan's law says that:

Not (A Or B) <=> Not A And Not B

Which means (StartA <= EndB) and (EndA >= StartB)

NOTE: This includes conditions where the edges overlap exactly. If you wish to exclude that,
change the >= operators to >, and <= to <

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+1 for a solution that makes you feel like a genius for getting it! –  Samantha yesterday

I believe that it is sufficient to say that the two ranges overlap if:

(StartDate1 <= EndDate2) and (StartDate2 <= EndDate1)
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2  
I find the (StartDate1 <= EndDate2) and (EndDate1 >= StartDate2) notation easier to understand, Range1 is always on left in the tests. –  A.L Dec 2 '13 at 14:46
    
This assumes start and end dates are inclusive. Change <= to < if start is inclusive and end is exclusive. –  Richard Schneider Apr 9 at 2:54

For reasoning about temporal relations (or any other interval relations, come to that), consider Allen's Interval Algebra. It describes the 13 possible relations that two intervals can have with respect to each other. You can find other references - "Allen's Interval" seem to be the operative search terms. You can also find information about these operations in Snodgrass's "Developing Time-Oriented Applications in SQL" (PDF available online at URL), and in Date, Darwen and Lorentzos "Temporal Data and the Relational Model" (see Amazon.com, etc).


ErikE comments:

You can only get 13 if you count things funny... I can get "15 possible relations that two intervals can have" when I go crazy with it. By sensible counting, I get only six, and if you throw out caring whether A or B comes first, I get only three (no intersect, partially intersect, one wholly within other). 15 goes like this: [before:before, start, within, end, after], [start:start, within, end, after],[within:within, end, after], [end:end, after], [after:after].

I think that you cannot count the two entries 'before:before' and 'after:after'. I could see 7 entries if you equate some relations with their inverses (see the diagram in the referenced Wikipedia URL; it has 7 entries, 6 of which have a different inverse, with equals not having a distinct inverse). And whether three is sensible depends on your requirements.

----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------
    |----B1----|
           |----B2----|
               |----B3----|
               |----------B4----------|
               |----------------B5----------------|
                      |----B6----|
----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------
                      |------B7-------|
                      |----------B8-----------|
                         |----B9----|
                         |----B10-----|
                         |--------B11--------|
                                      |----B12----|
                                         |----B13----|
----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------
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1  
You can only get 13 if you count things funny... I can get "15 possible relations that two intervals can have" when I go crazy with it. By sensible counting, I get only six, and if you throw out caring whether A or B comes first, I get only three (no intersect, partially intersect, one wholly within other). 15 goes like this: [before:before, start, within, end, after], [start:start, within, end, after],[within:within, end, after], [end:end, after], [after:after]. –  ErikE Mar 9 '10 at 1:18
    
@Emtucifor: I think that you cannot count the two entries 'before:before' and 'after:after'. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 '10 at 2:37
    
Re your update: B1 to A is before:before and B13 to A is after:after. Your nice diagram is missing start:start between B5 B6, and end:end between B11 and B12. If being on an endpoint is significant, then you have to count it, so the final tally is 15, not 13. I don't think the endpoint thing is significant, so I personally count it [before: before, within, after], [within: within, after], [after:after] which comes to 6. I think the whole endpoint thing is just confusion about whether the bounds are inclusive or exclusive. The exclusiveness of the endpoints don't change the core relations! –  ErikE Mar 10 '10 at 20:38
    
That is, in my scheme the these are equivalent: (B2, B3, B4), (B6, B7, B9, B10), (B8, B11, B12). I realize that B7 implies the information that the two ranges exactly coincide. But I'm not convinced this additional information should be part of the base intersection relations. For example, when two intervals are the exact same length even if not coincident or even overlapping, should that be considered another "relation"? I say no, and seeing as this additional aspect is the only thing making B7 distinct from B6, then I think having endpoints-as-separate-cases makes things inconsistent. –  ErikE Mar 10 '10 at 20:51
    
@Emtucifor: OK - I see why I misidentified 'before:before' and 'after:after' as the entries; however, I cannot picture what the 'start:start' and 'end:end' entries should look like. Since you can't edit my diagram, can you email me (see my profile) with a modified copy of the diagram showing the 'start:start' and 'end:end' relationships? I have no major issues with your groupings. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 10 '10 at 21:07

All the solutions that check a multitude of conditions based on where the ranges are in relation to one another can be greatly simplified by just ensuring that a specific range starts earlier! You ensure that the first range starts earlier (or at the same time) by swapping the ranges if necessary up front.

Then, you can detect overlap if the other range start is less than or equal to the first range end (if ranges are inclusive, containing both the start and end times) or less than (if ranges are inclusive of start and exclusive of end).

Assuming inclusive at both ends, there's only four possibilities of which one is a non-overlap:

|----------------------|        range 1
|--->                           range 2 overlap
 |--->                          range 2 overlap
                       |--->    range 2 overlap
                        |--->   range 2 no overlap

The endpoint of the range 2 doesn't enter into it. So, in pseudo-code:

def doesOverlap (r1, r2):
    if r1.s > r2.s:
        swap r1, r2
    if r2.s > r1.e:
        return false
    return true

This could be simplified even more into:

def doesOverlap (r1, r2):
    if r1.s > r2.s:
        swap r1, r2
    return r2.s <= r1.e

If the ranges are inclusive at the start and exclusive at the end, you just have to replace > with >= in the second if statement (for the first code segment: in the second code segment, you'd use < rather than <=):

|----------------------|        range 1
|--->                           range 2 overlap
 |--->                          range 2 overlap
                       |--->    range 2 no overlap
                        |--->   range 2 no overlap

You greatly limit the number of checks you have to make because you remove half of the problem space early by ensuring range 1 never starts after range 2.

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1  
+1 for mentioning the inclusive/exclusive problem. I was going to whip up an answer myself when I had time, but no need now. The thing is you almost never allow both the start and end to be inclusive simultaneously. In my industry it is common practice to treat the start as exlusive and the end as inclusive, but either way is fine as long as you stay consistent. This is the first completely correct answer on this question so far...IMO. –  Brian Gideon Aug 6 '10 at 3:50

This article Time Period Library for .NET describes the relation of two time periods by the enumeration PeriodRelation:

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------
public enum PeriodRelation
{
    After,
    StartTouching,
    StartInside,
    InsideStartTouching,
    EnclosingStartTouching,
    Enclosing,
    EnclosingEndTouching,
    ExactMatch,
    Inside,
    InsideEndTouching,
    EndInside,
    EndTouching,
    Before,
} // enum PeriodRelation

enter image description here

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I woud do

StartDate1.IsBetween(StartDate2, EndDate2) || EndDate1.IsBetween(StartDate2, EndDate2)

Where IsBetween is something like

	public static bool IsBetween(this DateTime value, DateTime left, DateTime right) {
		return (value > left && value < right) || (value < left && value > right);
	}
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I would prefer (left < value && value < right) || (right < value && value < left) for this method. –  Patrick Huizinga Nov 28 '08 at 15:22
    
Thanks for this. Makes things easier in my head. –  stigok Nov 10 '09 at 15:05
1  
Why would you check four conditions when you only have to check two? Fail. –  ErikE Mar 9 '10 at 1:19
2  
Ah, my apologies, I see now that you are allowing the ranges to be in reverse order (StartDateX > EndDateX). Strange. Anyway, what if StartDate1 is less than StartDate2 and EndDate1 is greater than EndDate2? The code you gave will not detect this overlapping condition. –  ErikE Mar 11 '10 at 5:17

If the overlap itself should be calculated as well, you can use the following formula:

overlap = max(0, min(EndDate1, EndDate2) - max(StartDate1, StartDate2))
if (overlap > 0) { 
    ...
}
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I know this has been tagged as language-agnostic, but for all of you implementing in Java: Don't reinvent the wheel and use Joda Time.

http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/api-release/org/joda/time/base/AbstractInterval.html#overlaps(org.joda.time.ReadableInterval)

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The easiest way to do it in my opinion would be to compare if either EndDate1 is before StartDate2 or EndDate2 is before StartDate1.

That of course if you are considering intervals in the future and not the past ( StartDate always before EndDate)

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Here is a generic method that can be usefull locally.

    // Takes a list and returns all records that have overlapping time ranges.
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetOverlappedTimes<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, Func<T, bool> filter, Func<T,DateTime> start, Func<T, DateTime> end)
    {
        // Selects all records that match filter() on left side and returns all records on right side that overlap.
        var overlap = from t1 in list
                      where filter(t1)
                      from t2 in list
                      where !object.Equals(t1, t2) // Don't match the same record on right side.
                      let in1 = start(t1)
                      let out1 = end(t1)
                      let in2 = start(t2)
                      let out2 = end(t2)
                      where in1 <= out2 && out1 >= in2
                      let totover = GetMins(in1, out1, in2, out2)
                      select t2;

        return overlap;
    }

    public static void TestOverlap()
    {
        var tl1 = new TempTimeEntry() { ID = 1, Name = "Bill", In = "1/1/08 1:00pm".ToDate(), Out = "1/1/08 4:00pm".ToDate() };
        var tl2 = new TempTimeEntry() { ID = 2, Name = "John", In = "1/1/08 5:00pm".ToDate(), Out = "1/1/08 6:00pm".ToDate() };
        var tl3 = new TempTimeEntry() { ID = 3, Name = "Lisa", In = "1/1/08 7:00pm".ToDate(), Out = "1/1/08 9:00pm".ToDate() };
        var tl4 = new TempTimeEntry() { ID = 4, Name = "Joe", In = "1/1/08 3:00pm".ToDate(), Out = "1/1/08 8:00pm".ToDate() };
        var tl5 = new TempTimeEntry() { ID = 1, Name = "Bill", In = "1/1/08 8:01pm".ToDate(), Out = "1/1/08 8:00pm".ToDate() };
        var list = new List<TempTimeEntry>() { tl1, tl2, tl3, tl4, tl5 };
        var overlap = GetOverlappedTimes(list, (TempTimeEntry t1)=>t1.ID==1, (TempTimeEntry tIn) => tIn.In, (TempTimeEntry tOut) => tOut.Out);

        Console.WriteLine("\nRecords overlap:");
        foreach (var tl in overlap)
            Console.WriteLine("Name:{0} T1In:{1} T1Out:{2}", tl.Name, tl.In, tl.Out);
        Console.WriteLine("Done");

        /*  Output:
            Records overlap:
            Name:Joe T1In:1/1/2008 3:00:00 PM T1Out:1/1/2008 8:00:00 PM
            Name:Lisa T1In:1/1/2008 7:00:00 PM T1Out:1/1/2008 9:00:00 PM
            Done
         */
    }
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if (StartDate1 > StartDate2) swap(StartDate, EndDate);

(StartDate1 <= EndDate2) and (StartDate2 <= EndDate1);
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Second line is sufficient. What is the purpose of the first line? What are StartDate and EndDate it refers to? –  0xF Oct 22 '13 at 11:20

Split the problem into cases then handle each case.

The situation 'two date ranges intersect' is covered by two cases - the first date range starts within the second, or the second date range starts within the first.

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This was my javascript solution with moment.js:

// Current row dates
var dateStart = moment("2014-08-01", "YYYY-MM-DD");
var dateEnd = moment("2014-08-30", "YYYY-MM-DD");

// Check with dates above
var rangeUsedStart = moment("2014-08-02", "YYYY-MM-DD");
var rangeUsedEnd = moment("2014-08-015", "YYYY-MM-DD");

// Range covers other ?
if((dateStart <= rangeUsedStart) && (rangeUsedEnd <= dateEnd)) {
    return false;
}
// Range intersects with other start ?
if((dateStart <= rangeUsedStart) && (rangeUsedStart <= dateEnd)) {
    return false;
}
// Range intersects with other end ?
if((dateStart <= rangeUsedEnd) && (rangeUsedEnd <= dateEnd)) {
    return false;
}

// All good
return true;
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The solution posted here did not work for all overlapping ranges...

----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------
    |----B1----|
           |----B2----|
               |----B3----|
               |----------B4----------|
               |----------------B5----------------|
                      |----B6----|
----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------
                      |------B7-------|
                      |----------B8-----------|
                         |----B9----|
                         |----B10-----|
                         |--------B11--------|
                                      |----B12----|
                                         |----B13----|
----------------------|-------A-------|----------------------

my working solution was:

AND (
  ('start_date' BETWEEN STARTDATE AND ENDDATE) -- caters for inner and end date outer
  OR
  ('end_date' BETWEEN STARTDATE AND ENDDATE) -- caters for inner and start date outer
  OR
  (STARTDATE BETWEEN 'start_date' AND 'end_date') -- only one needed for outer range where dates are inside.
) 
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You can try this:

//custom date for example
$d1 = new DateTime("2012-07-08");
$d2 = new DateTime("2012-07-11");
$d3 = new DateTime("2012-07-08");
$d4 = new DateTime("2012-07-15");

//create a date period object
$interval = new DateInterval('P1D');
$daterange = iterator_to_array(new DatePeriod($d1, $interval, $d2));
$daterange1 = iterator_to_array(new DatePeriod($d3, $interval, $d4));
array_map(function($v) use ($daterange1) { if(in_array($v, $daterange1)) print "Bingo!";}, $daterange);
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In case you're using a date range that has not ended yet (still on going) e.g. not set endDate = '0000-00-00' you can not use BETWEEN because 0000-00-00 is not a valid date!

I used this solution:

(Startdate BETWEEN '".$startdate2."' AND '".$enddate2."')  //overlap: starts between start2/end2
OR (Startdate < '".$startdate2."' 
  AND (enddate = '0000-00-00' OR enddate >= '".$startdate2."')
) //overlap: starts before start2 and enddate not set 0000-00-00 (still on going) or if enddate is set but higher then startdate2

If startdate2 is higher then enddate there is no overlap!

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In Microsoft SQL SERVER - SQL Function

CREATE FUNCTION IsOverlapDates 
(
    @startDate1 as datetime,
    @endDate1 as datetime,
    @startDate2 as datetime,
    @endDate2 as datetime
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @Overlap as int
SET @Overlap = (SELECT CASE WHEN  (
        (@startDate1 BETWEEN @startDate2 AND @endDate2) -- caters for inner and end date outer
        OR
        (@endDate1 BETWEEN @startDate2 AND @endDate2) -- caters for inner and start date outer
        OR
        (@startDate2 BETWEEN @startDate1 AND @endDate1) -- only one needed for outer range where dates are inside.
        ) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
    )
    RETURN @Overlap

END
GO

--Execution of the above code
DECLARE @startDate1 as datetime
DECLARE @endDate1 as datetime
DECLARE @startDate2 as datetime
DECLARE @endDate2 as datetime
DECLARE @Overlap as int
SET @startDate1 = '2014-06-01 01:00:00' 
SET @endDate1 =   '2014-06-01 02:00:00'
SET @startDate2 = '2014-06-01 01:00:00' 
SET @endDate2 =   '2014-06-01 01:30:00'

SET @Overlap = [dbo].[IsOverlapDates]  (@startDate1, @endDate1, @startDate2, @endDate2)

SELECT Overlap = @Overlap
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public static class NumberExtensionMethods
    {
        public static Boolean IsBetween(this Int64 value, Int64 Min, Int64 Max)
        {
            if (value >= Min && value <= Max) return true;
            else return false;
        }

        public static Boolean IsBetween(this DateTime value, DateTime Min, DateTime Max)
        {
            Int64 numricValue = value.Ticks;
            Int64 numericStartDate = Min.Ticks;
            Int64 numericEndDate = Max.Ticks;

            if (numricValue.IsBetween(numericStartDate, numericEndDate) )
            {
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        }
    }

public static Boolean IsOverlap(DateTime startDate1, DateTime endDate1, DateTime startDate2, DateTime endDate2)
        {
            Int64 numericStartDate1 = startDate1.Ticks;
            Int64 numericEndDate1 = endDate1.Ticks;
            Int64 numericStartDate2 = startDate2.Ticks;
            Int64 numericEndDate2 = endDate2.Ticks;

            if (numericStartDate2.IsBetween(numericStartDate1, numericEndDate1) ||
                numericEndDate2.IsBetween(numericStartDate1, numericEndDate1) ||
                numericStartDate1.IsBetween(numericStartDate2, numericEndDate2) ||
                numericEndDate1.IsBetween(numericStartDate2, numericEndDate2))
            {
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        } 


if (IsOverlap(startdate1, enddate1, startdate2, enddate2))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("IsOverlap");
            }
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1  
Mind to add some words of explanation? –  Frank N. Stein Jul 18 at 17:31

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