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If a db "A" created at site alpha then also schema copied at site beta still data in both is same and must be in sync, is that a distributed database or would it be wrong?

If not, why is it not distributed? What does it need to be called distributed? Same schema different data? Or...?

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Please provide a link to a definition of "Distributed Database" that you like. There are several, which one do you prefer? – S.Lott Jul 15 '10 at 20:36
    
Perhaps you could you elaborate on the question - is this purely hypothetical, or do you have 2 DB's that you need to sync up..? Why 2 DB's in sync rather than 1 DB? – saille Jul 15 '10 at 20:46
    
self learning, no reason currently – user287745 Jul 15 '10 at 21:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Neither. It is not a distributed DB, and it is not wrong. It is a copy of a database. The real question is how to keep them in sync.

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What definition are you using? Can you provide some details? – S.Lott Jul 15 '10 at 20:38
    
well go to wikipedia and distributed database....."A distributed database is a collection of multiple, logically interrelated databases distributed over a computer network. Sometimes "distributed database system" is used to refer jointly to the distributed database and the distributed DBMS" – user287745 Jul 15 '10 at 20:42
    
please see edit thanks for helping – user287745 Jul 15 '10 at 20:44
    
"..must be in sync" sounds like the DB's are not in sync but need to be? Hence it sounds like you have 2 disconnected DB's. But if they are connected & sync'd then yes, you have a Distributed Database. – saille Jul 15 '10 at 20:54

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