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I have an array that I want to iterate over and delete some of the elements. This doesn't work:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
a.each do |x|
  next if x < 3
  a.delete x
  # do something with x
end
a #=> [1, 2, 4]

I want a to be [1, 2]. How can I get around this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 52 down vote accepted

a.delete_if { |x| x >= 3 }

See method documentation here

Update:

You can handle x in the block:

a.delete_if do |element|
  if element >= 3
    do_something_with(element)
    true # Make sure the if statement returns true, so it gets marked for deletion
  end
end
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I need to do something with x if it gets deleted. Should I put that in the block? –  Adrian Jul 15 '10 at 22:59
    
Yep, see my updated answer –  Chubas Jul 15 '10 at 23:08
1  
@Adrian Or you could use reject!. –  XåpplI'-I0llwlg'I - Apr 21 at 11:07

You don't have to delete from the array, you can filter it so:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

b = a.select {|x| x < 3}

puts b.inspect # => [1,2]

b.each {|i| puts i} # do something to each here
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I asked this question not long ago.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2933366/deleting-while-iterating-in-ruby

It's not working because Ruby exits the .each loop when attempting to delete something. If you simply want to delete things from the array, delete_if will work, but if you want more control, the solution I have in that thread works, though it's kind of ugly.

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3  
The deletion doesn't break the loop. each effectively iterates by using the index. So if you delete, the indexes are different, and the next iteration will use the new indexes. Try this: arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6]; arr.each_with_index {|e,i| p [arr, e, i]; next if e < 3; arr.delete e }. When item 3 is reached, the index is 2. After 3 is deleted, the next iteration increments index to 3, and the item is 5. So 4 is skipped. 6 is skipped for the same reason. –  Kelvin Jan 3 '13 at 21:41

Another way to do it is using reject!, which is arguably clearer since it has a ! which means "this will change the array". The only difference is that reject! will return nil if no changes were made.

a.delete_if {|x| x >= 3 }

or

a.reject! {|x| x >= 3 }

will both work fine.

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