Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
void Afunction(int* outvar)
{
    if(outvar)
        *outvar = 1337;
}

note the qualities: it allows you to optionally pass a variable by reference, so that it can be set by the function.

my closest guess would be (ref int? outvar)

but that produces ref (int?) NOT (ref int)? which is what I need

this functionality is hardly a scarcely used feature of c or c++, so I assume there must be some equivalent? Edit: so let me try a good example, I think a Colision check function is a prime example, where you have the primary test being whether or not two objects are in contact, then the optional output of the projection vector, calculating the projection vector takes extra time, so you only want to do it if they want it, on the other hand, it usually uses alot of the info calculated when doing the collision test.

bool Collide(colObject obj1, colObject obj2, Vector3* projection)
{

    //do a bunch of expensive operations to determine if there is collision
    if(!collided)return false;
    if(projection != NULL)
    {
        //do more expensive operations, that make use of the above operations already done,
        //to determine the proj vect
        *proj = result;
    }
    return true;
}

note that I am currently just porting c++ code to c#, so I might not have though of any real 'out of the box' solutions

share|improve this question
2  
What is the behavior diffirence you are expecting expecting between ref (int?) and (ref int)? –  Chris Pitman Jul 16 '10 at 2:00
2  
Maybe if you describe the problem you're trying to solve, there might be a more obvious c#py solution. Right now it looks like you're trying to make c# fit into a c++ programming paradigm. –  SnOrfus Jul 16 '10 at 2:07
    
I understand that 'ref' is not really a type modifier like ? is, but Ideally, I would like a ? type that contained a reference to an int, rather than a reference to a ? type that contained an int, so I can achieve the functionality mentioned above, I basically want to be able to pass by reference, but also be able to pass 'null' to make the parameter optional in much the same way you do with the ? type mod. –  matt Jul 16 '10 at 2:09
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The best you can get in C# is Action<int>, like this:

void MyFunction(Action<int> valueReceiver) {
    if (valueReceiver != null)
        valueReceiver(1337);
}

Usage:

MyFunction(null);
MyFunction(v => someVariable = v);
share|improve this answer
3  
Func<int> is for a function that will return an int and take no parameters. What you want is Action<int> which takes an int and has no return value –  Grant Peters Jul 16 '10 at 2:23
2  
@Grant - 18 minutes for someone to notice? I think we are slipping. –  ChaosPandion Jul 16 '10 at 2:26
    
@Grant, @ChaosPandion: Thanks; I need more sleep. –  SLaks Jul 16 '10 at 2:28
    
not as pretty as I might like, but it will do! thanks! –  matt Jul 16 '10 at 2:28
add comment

It depends on what you want to use that pointer for in C++. There are four things you can use a pointer for:

  1. Setting the value of the variable pointed to by the pointer.
  2. Fetching the value of the variable pointed to by the pointer.
  3. Comparing the pointer itself to null
  4. Comparing the pointer itself to another pointer.

If you want to do the first one, make it an "out" parameter.

If you want to do the first two, make it a "ref" parameter.

If you want to do the first three, then what I usually do in this unfortunate situation is:

sealed class Ref<T>
{
    private Action<T> setter;
    private Func<T> getter;
    public Ref(Action<T> setter, Func<T> getter) 
    {
        this.setter = setter;
        this.getter = getter;
    }
    public T Value { get { return getter(); } set { setter(value); } }
}

and now you can say

void M(Ref<int> r)
{
    if (r != null) // 3
    {
        Console.WriteLine(r.Value); // 2
        r.Value = 123; // 1
    }
}
...
int x = 0;
M(new Ref<int>(y=>{x=y;}, ()=>x); // pass a 'ref' to x

Then I refactor the code so that I am not in a situation where I have to pass something for the express purpose of mutating it.

Alternatively, a bit simpler but less flexible about where the variable is stored:

class Ref<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}
... M same as before ...
Ref<int> x = new Ref<int>();
x.Value = 0;
M(x); 

With the delegate scheme you get added flexibility because the delegates can of course do more complex things than just getting and setting variables.

If you want all four: use C++, not C#, or use the unsafe subset of C# and stick with pointers. There's no easy way to compare references to each other in normal C#.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Isn't this what you want?

private void foo()
{
    int? y = 0;
    bar(ref y);

    int? z = null;
    bar(ref z);

    // shows "y = 42, z = "
    MessageBox.Show(string.Format("y = {0}, z = {1}", y, z));
}

private void bar(ref int? varRef)
{
    if (varRef != null)
        varRef = 42;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I also though that this would be pretty close. Although it is a bit clunky. –  ChaosPandion Jul 16 '10 at 2:44
add comment

I can't think of a direct translation of that C code. I think the C# paradigm looks more like this:

void Afunction()
{
}

void Afunction(out int outvar)
{
    Afunction();
    outvar = 1337;
}
share|improve this answer
    
He wants to be able to skip the calculation. –  SLaks Jul 16 '10 at 2:07
    
@SLaks: Put the calculation in Afunction(out int outvar). Put anything that doesn't get skipped (if anything) in Afunction(). –  Daniel Stutzbach Jul 16 '10 at 4:31
add comment

I think ref is more in line with the intent of the C code:

void Afunction(ref int refvar) { 
    refvar = 1337; 
} 

But you can also resort to unsafe:

unsafe void Afunction(int* pvar) {
  if (pvar != null) {
    *pvar = 1337;
  }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to assume that unsafe code isn't supported on windows phone 7? –  matt Jul 16 '10 at 3:32
    
And you would be right. –  Jordão Jul 16 '10 at 13:12
add comment

Try the out keyword.

void Afunction(out int outvar) {
    outvar = 1337;
}

It is not exactly equivalent. For example, you must assign a value to an out argument unless you throw from the function.

share|improve this answer
    
the key word there is 'optional' sometimes I don't need the outvar, so in c I would just pass null, this allows the function to know whether the outval is even needed, and can therefore skip a whole bunch of calculation if it isn't –  matt Jul 16 '10 at 2:01
add comment

I guess one thing you could do is make 2 proxy functions that call a hidden function and just appending an extra parameter to tell the hidden function what is happening.

E.g.

private bool Collide(colObject obj1, colObject obj2, ref Vector3 projection, bool calcProjection)
{

    //do a bunch of expensive operations to determine if there is collision
    if(!collided)return false;
    // Now instead of checking if projection is null, we just check if they requested it
    if(calcProjection)
    {
        //do more expensive operations, that make use of the above operations already done,
        //to determine the proj vect
        *proj = result;
    }
    return true;
}

public bool Collide(colObject obj1, colObject obj2, ref Vector3 projection)
{
    return Collide(obj1, obj2, ref projection, true);
}

public bool Collide(colObject obj1, colObject obj2)
{
    Vector3 dummy;
    return Collide(obj1, obj2, ref dummy, false);
}

Not sure how well this will perform compared to the other answers here, but seeing how most of them create intermediary objects, it SHOULD be comparable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.