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This method:

boolean containsSmiley(String s) {
    if (s == null) {
        return false;
    }
    else {
        return s.contains(":)");
    }
}

can equivalently be written:

boolean containsSmiley(String s) {
    if (s == null) {
        return false;
    }

    return s.contains(":)");
}

In my experience, the second form is seen more often, especially in more complex methods (where there may be several such exit points), and the same is true for "throw" as well as "return". Yet the first form arguably makes the conditional structure of the code more explicit. Are there any reasons to prefer one over the other?

(Related: Should a function have only one return statement?)

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I think you reversed the two code samples. I swapped them and put the else-using one first. Hope that's what you meant and I didn't mess up your question. –  John Kugelman Jul 16 '10 at 4:12
    
@John: thanks! (Maybe it was the words "first" and "second" I got wrong, but in any case it needed fixing). –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 4:19
2  
Should a function have only one return statement? that guy got 3000 points for that answer? we have serious deflation going on!! –  irreputable Jul 16 '10 at 6:09
2  
well like what derek mention, there is no correct ans. however, i have been using the 2nd method. why? if you put a 'return', there is no need to put an 'else' since the execution would stop there if it's null. furthermore, it reduces the number of curly braces. –  nuttynibbles Jul 16 '10 at 6:34
1  
@irreputable: Note that the 3000 point answer is actually owned by "community wiki". However, I believe one needs 20k to actually become enlightened enough to understand what the heck "community wiki" means! –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 6:47

22 Answers 22

up vote 41 down vote accepted

In my experience, it depends on the code. If I'm 'guarding' against something, I'll do:

if (inputVar.isBad()) {
    return;
}

doThings();

The point is clear: If that statement is false, I don't want the function to continue.

On the other hand, there are some functions with multiple options, and in that case I would write it like this:

if (inputVar == thingOne) {
    doFirstThing();
} else if (inputVar == secondThing) {
    doSecondThing();
} else {
    doThirdThing();
}

Even though it could be written as:

if (inputVar == thingOne) {
    doFirstThing();
    return;
}
if (inputVar == thingTwo) {
    doSecondThing();
    return;
}
doThingThree();
return;

It really comes down to which way most clearly shows what the code is doing (not necessarily which bit of code is shortest or has the least indentation).

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10  
+1 for "It really comes down to which way most clearly shows what the code is doing" –  Cam Jul 16 '10 at 4:48
4  
My take-away from all of this is: return statements near the start or the end of a function are probably fine, but return statements half-way through a complex function are a code smell (i.e. consider refactoring to reduce exit points). –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 8:58
1  
@Todd Owen: In general, I think that's a great way to put it. I think there are exceptions, but every style rule has exceptions. –  Brendan Long Jul 16 '10 at 19:40
    
The later example sounds awfully close to a switch. Also, in Python I would just have a dictionary of values to lambdas, and do this: if not inputVar in input2Func: raise(...) # Implicit else :) x = input2Func[inputVar](). Other languages can allow something like this too ... the only trick is that signatures must match. –  Hamish Grubijan Aug 6 '10 at 1:55
    
It only sounds close to a switch when you are doing a simple comparison on a single variable. At least Java won't allow you to switch on multiple variables or various complex conditions; then you need a set of if statements. –  Michael Kjörling Jul 20 '12 at 12:53

The else in that case would be redundant, as well as create unnecessary extra indentation for the main code of the function.

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12  
This. This is it right here. –  Randolpho Jul 16 '10 at 4:22
2  
Exactly, anything that is after the if clause is basically in an else statement anyway, since the only way to get there is to bypass the if by having the condition false, since if the condition is true, the method returns, and nothing else after the if is executed. –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Jul 16 '10 at 6:53

This is a pattern called Guard Clause. The idea is do all the checking upfront to reduce nested conditions to increase readability.

From the link:

double getPayAmount() {
    double result;
    if (_isDead) {
        result = deadAmount();
    } else {
        if (_isSeparated) {
            result = separatedAmount();
        } else {
            if (_isRetired) {
                result = retiredAmount();
            } else {
                result = normalPayAmount();
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}


double getPayAmount() {
    if (_isDead) return deadAmount();
    if (_isSeparated) return separatedAmount();
    if (_isRetired) return retiredAmount();

    return normalPayAmount();
};
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15  
Do we have to call everything a "pattern" and give it a name? –  Grant Paul Jul 16 '10 at 5:56
17  
Absolutely, that's how a lot of people who can't code earn lots of money. –  drekka Jul 16 '10 at 6:06
3  
Isn't it called YAGNI? You ain't gonna need that else statement ;) –  Niels van der Rest Jul 16 '10 at 6:26
4  
@chpwn, patterns are nothing but vocabulary that's shared among some community for a practice that already exist in the field. I used to call this one "get out early," but it's nice to have some word that can convey the concept, so someone who knows it gets in a second. –  Eugene Yokota Jul 16 '10 at 15:32
2  
@bitschnau, from the performance point of view, it's a good idea to run the profiler and optimize only the code that matters. –  Eugene Yokota Jul 16 '10 at 15:34

I prefer writing it like this:

boolean containsSmiley(String s) {
    return s != null && s.contains(":)");
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 since this is a predicate and most predicates are one-liners... but it doesn't really answer the question –  Tim Bender Jul 16 '10 at 6:03

You will see this all over:

if (condition) {
    return var;
}
// by nature, when execution reaches this point, condition can only be false,
// therefore, the else is unnecessary
return other_var;

Most of the time the addition of an else clause is not only unnecessary in this case, but a lot of times, it gets optimized away by the compiler.

Think of how the computer thinks of this code (in terms of machine code, simplified into pseudocode here for demonstration purposes):

0x00: test [condition]
0x01: if result of test was not true, goto [0x04]
0x02: push [var] onto stack
0x03: goto [0x05]
0x04: push [other_var] onto stack
0x05: return from subroutine

The code (again, this is a pseudocode and not assembly) would act the exact same way for an if/then/else conditional.

It is, by many people, considered bad and/or confusing practice to have multiple possible exit points for a function, as a programmer must think of every possible path through his code. Another practice is the following:

return (condition) ? var : other_var;

This simplifies the code, and does not create any new exit points.

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Like any "discussion" about coding styles there is no correct answer. I prefer to apply these considerations:

  1. Does the code work as expected in all situations. (Principle of least surprise)

  2. Can the next developer (myself or someone else) understand what it is doing and why.

  3. How fragile is the code with respect to change.

  4. Is is simple as it needs to be and no more. I.e. no over or under engineering.

Once I'm happy that I have satisfied the above, the rest generally just falls falls into line.

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It's religious argument and at the end of the day it doesn't matter. I'd even argue that the first form is more readable in some circumstances. If you have large chunks of code in an if-elseif-elseif-else, it's easier, at first glance to see what the default return is.

if (s == null) {
    return false;
}
else if (s.Contains(":))")) {
    return true;
}
else if (s.Contains(":-(")) {
    return false;
}

return s.contains(":)");
share|improve this answer
    
Still, wouldn't switch be more appropriate in this case? –  Anax Jul 16 '10 at 5:41
1  
You can't have function calls as switch labels. They have to be either literals or const s. –  Igor Zevaka Jul 16 '10 at 5:48
    
Silly me, just noticed that :S –  Anax Jul 16 '10 at 6:01

Occam's Razor is the principle that "entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity."

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Who said anything about multiplying? :) –  Drew Hall Jul 16 '10 at 5:07
    
Well, I'm sorry for positing the existence of the "else" clause! But Santa Claus is real, right? :) –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 6:27
    
Haha, well maybe I should have made things clearer. In this case you should interpret Occam's Razor as the principle that says 'when two solutions are presented to your problem, both equally valid, choose the simpler of the two.' In this case the option without the extra text is simpler. –  ldog Jul 16 '10 at 17:01

The if statement is checking/enforcing your contract/expectation of not receiving null values. For that reason, I would prefer to see it separated from the rest of the function as it doesn't have anything to do with the actual logic of what you're trying to accomplish (though this case is very simple).

In most cases, though, I prefer code to be as explicit as possible in its intent. If there's something that you can restructure about your function to make it more readable for others, do it. As a professional programmer, your goal should really be to program for those who have to maintain your code after you (including yourself 2 years later...). Anything you can do to help them out is worth doing.

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The else is redundant. Also some IDEs (Eclipse) and analysis tools (maybe FindBugs) may flag that as a warning or an error, so in that case programmers are likely to remove it.

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1  
I'm already surprised certain IDEs decide this is warning, but an error? Can we have names? –  zneak Jul 16 '10 at 4:20
    
+1 Eclipse does this. It's debatable whether its "correct" but because the IDE flags it as a warning by default, many will do this. –  Greg Jul 16 '10 at 4:22
1  
You can configure Eclipse to give error or warning about this. I don't remember what is the default. –  Juha Syrjälä Jul 16 '10 at 4:41
    
PMD, on the other hand, warns about having multiple return statements by default. –  kibibu Jul 16 '10 at 5:30
    
resharper warns about this, too. –  atamanroman Jul 16 '10 at 5:54

Cause it's nicer. You know you could also use '{' '}' to create several levels of nesting, but nobody really does it for just the heck of it.

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Someone else probably noted this already, but I'd recommend against using null values in general where strings are expected. If you really want a check to prevent someone passing null values, you can use asserts (at dev time) or unit tests (deploy):

boolean containsSmiley(String s) {
    assert s != null : "Quit passing null values, you moron.";
    return s.contains(":)");
}

I've switched to a general rule of thumb: Never. Ever. pass null values, unless an external API calls explicitly asks for it. Second: If an external method may return null values, replace it with a sensible non-null value (such as an empty string) or add a neat check. I grow sick of repetitive if (thing == null) checks.

But that's a bit offtopic. I like putting short conditions on top and guard clauses, removing elses if program flow dictates it'll never get there.

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The first form is simply less verbose - when you return a value you automatically leave the scope of the function you're in and return to the caller, so any of the code thereafter will only execute if the IF statement doesn't evaluate to true and subsequently return anything.

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I'd argue for readability. If you're scanning screens of code trying to figure out what the code does, it's a visual prompt to the developer.

...but it's not really needed because we all comment our code so well, right? :)

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5  
I note your smiley ... but comments are not a substitute for readable code. Comments are for when you can't make the code readable/understandable any other way. –  Stephen C Jul 16 '10 at 4:13

In my opinion, the second one makes more sense. It serves as more of a 'default' action, like a switch. If it doesn't match any of the other exit points, then do that. You don't really need an else there. I would say if the entire function is only if and elseif, then an else would make sense there because it's one giant conditional. If there's multiple conditionals and other functions that are run within it, then a default return at the end would be used.

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While having an else is correct and there's nothing wrong with it in terms of logic and runnability, I like to avoid the initial WTF moment when the function has no return statement outside of the if/else scope.

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That's something I hadn't thought of, but wouldn't this warning to the reader (that there are multiple exit points in the function) be a good thing? –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 6:32

As you can see, different people have different opinions on readability. Some people think that fewer lines of code tends to make the code more readable. Others think that the symmetry of the second form makes it more readable.

My take is that probably, both views are correct ... for the people who hold them. And the corollary is that you cannot write code that everyone finds optimally readable. So, the best advice is to follow what your mandated coding standard says to do (if it says anything on this) and generally use your common sense. (If you are burdened with some vociferous nitwit that insists that his way is "right" ... just go with the flow.)

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Because there is an optional (switched off by default) warning in eclipse if else is used in such situation ;).

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Well, some of the reason is just convention, but there is one advantage to the form above...

It's typical when coding a return statement, to make the last statement your default return value. This primarily aids during refactoring - else clauses tend to get wrapped up in other structures, or might accidentally be moved deeper into the tree.

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I would prefer one exit point over multiple from maintenance perspective. Final result can be modified(or decorated) at one exit point rather than n exit points.

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Both versions of the code have exactly two exit points. –  Todd Owen Jul 16 '10 at 6:33

The second form if simpler/shorter. This doesn't always mean clearer. I suggest you do what you find clearest.. Personally I would write.

static boolean containsSmiley(String s) { 
    return s != null && s.contains(":)"); 
} 
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Because it's the same as writing one of the following which brings the evidence about the intention of the programmer:

boolean containsSmiley(String s) {
    if (s == null)   // The curly braces are not even necessary as the if contains only one instruction.
        return false;

    return s.contains(":)");
}

Or even this:

boolean constainsSMiley(String s) {
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) ? false : s.Contains(":)");
}

These two forms are:

  1. More elegant;
  2. Easier to read;
  3. Leaner and swifter for the reading programmer.
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