Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have often the case where I want to return an Enumerable<T> from a method or a property. To build the returning Enumerable<T>, I use a List<T>-instance. After filling the list, I return the list.

I always thought that this is enough. But it exists the possibility that the caller casts the resulting Enumerable<T> back into the List<T> and begins to work further with it. If in a later time I change the implementation of my method, the caller’s code will fail. To avoid this, I could return list.ToArray or make a read-only list before returning it to the caller. But for me this seems to be a big overkill. What do you think?

Please note, I never will return an internally used list so that the caller can change my objects internal state. The question is only about a short living list that is built temporary to hold the return values.

IEnumerable<string> GetAList() {
    List<string> aList = new List<string>();
    aList.Add("a");
    aList.Add("b");
    return aList;
}

IEnumerable<string> GetAList() {
    List<string> aList = new List<string>();
    aList.Add("a");
    aList.Add("b");
    return aList.ToArray<string>();
}

The examples are super-simple and in this case I would work from the beginning on with arrays, but it’s only to show explain the question.

share|improve this question
    
They could also just use LINQ methods such as .Concat(...)... you can't really prevent other developers from shooting themselves. –  Matthew Whited Jul 16 '10 at 10:36
    
I don't think it's so terrible to indirectly expose internal state through IEnumerable returns. Private accessibility is private by convention; the compiler enforces this fairly well, but once you're in a full-trust environment with Reflection, all bets are off. Granted, someone who uses Reflection to access a private field should have a pretty clear idea of the danger of what they're doing, but it's only marginally worse than casting a return type that is not guaranteed by a class's contract. Ideally, they can't even find out what type you're returning without Reflector or the debugger. –  Dan Bryant Jul 16 '10 at 11:52
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No, this is fine.

This is an example of 'polymorphism' at work. Because the caller to the method is only interested in an IEnumerable<string>, the internal workings of the method are free to return whatever class it likes as long as it derives from the IEnumerable<string> interface.

If the caller takes the IEnumerable<string> and casts up to List<string> then they have broken the contract, which only states that an 'IEnumerable<string> will be returned.

share|improve this answer
    
And its up to the caller not to assume something other than the signature declares. Right? –  Chris Valentine Jul 16 '10 at 10:23
    
Yes, I was just editing to add that while you commented :) –  Dr Herbie Jul 16 '10 at 10:24
    
I have accepted this answer because it was the first. But for all who are interested in this topic, I reccommend reading all the posts and above all the comments. I never have made a post that led to so much interesting comments. –  Chris Valentine Jul 16 '10 at 16:34
add comment

the possibility that the caller casts the resulting Enumerable<T> back into the List<T> and begins to work further with it

Any caller that does that only has themselves to blame if your implementation changes. You promise to return an Enumerable - so long as you continue to do that, you can't be held responsible for problems in callers that assume more than that.

Note also what @Chris mentions - that there may be political issues which at some point require you to maintain backward compatibility even for callers who 'broke the rules' - Raymond Chen (who works for Microsoft on the App Compatibility team) has a blog full of tales of the shenanigans that result when 'this application breaks on OS version x+1' is not an acceptable answer...

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could yield the list's elements from inside your method, thus preventing any kind of ill-conceived behaviour on the caller's part:

IEnumerable<string> GetAList() {
    List<string> aList = new List<string>();
    aList.Add("a");
    aList.Add("b");
    foreach (string s in aList)
        yield return s;
}

Of course, you can often just yield values as you produce them, thus avoiding the list entirely:

IEnumerable<string> GetAList() {
    yield return "a";
    yield return "b";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would say that you think I must care about ill using from the caller or is it only an example of how I can translate/protect the list? –  Chris Valentine Jul 16 '10 at 10:26
2  
@HCL: I'd say that in many ways it is not your problem but on the other hand if your code can be trivially refactored to prevent abuse by others then it seems like a good idea. After all, if you change in the future and their code stops working however much it is their fault do you think they are going to be annoyed with you for changing it? It might not be your responsibility but that doesn't mean it won't be your problem. –  Chris Jul 16 '10 at 10:31
5  
Using yield in this way does have an impact that you need to be aware of. For example, the Enumerable.Count extension method attempts a cast to ICollection with the as operator, and only enumerates if this cast fails. Also, if the caller enumerates the result more than once, then the whole of your method will be executed more than once if you are using yield - it's only executed once if you return a collection. –  Joe Jul 16 '10 at 10:45
add comment

Thought I'd make this a full fledged answer instead of just a comment.

AS others have said if you obey the contract an return an ienumerable others shouldn't make any more assumptions than that. However, some people might. If you then change it they are inevitably goign to come and blame you for it breaking (if they didn't understand enough to code it properly in the first place they are unlikely to spot the bug quickly).

When this happens you have two possibilities. You tell them its their problem and then leave them to fix it or you change your code to support theirs. The correct solution is the first one. However, in business this might not be feasible. If its a client that your bosses say you need to keep happy you might be told your code needs to change to keep the client happy and keep his business.

So from this point of view although it isn't your responsibility it can become your problem.

If your code is easily refactorable to return the exact type promised then I would do that. Its potentially little work now to save lots of work later and in theory nobody should even notice your change.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is a very good point. –  AakashM Jul 16 '10 at 10:44
    
"Nobody should ever notice your change." Well, what if another user comes complaining about the fact that he's casting to a different type that implements IEnumerable but isn't a List? Who should be satisfied? No, I agree completely with your first point, and not at all with your second. –  Tomas Lycken Jul 16 '10 at 11:46
    
@Tomas Lycken: By "Nobody should ever notice your change." I mean that if everybody is being behaved and treating the return type purely as an IEnumerable then changing from List to IEnumerable shouldn't be noticed by anybody. –  Chris Jul 16 '10 at 12:07
add comment

I think that your problem is farfetched because if someone improperly using your methods (making assumption about internal implementation), then actually that is not your problem.

But you if you using .net 3.5, then you can use AsEnumerable to completely hide internal implementation:

return aList.AsEnumerable();

Or simply wrap list with yield

foreach (string NextStr in aList)
    yield return NextStr;
share|improve this answer
    
AsEnumerable will not work, because it will return that same instance. –  Steven Jul 16 '10 at 10:31
1  
.Select(s=>s) will work. –  Matthew Whited Jul 16 '10 at 10:35
    
@Steven, Yep you are right, just checked it with Reflector. –  arbiter Jul 16 '10 at 10:35
    
Is this one of the linq-optimizations such as return Count() of a list will not count the instances but return the result of the Lists Count-property? Is there a good overview of such optimizations? Or should I better make a question out of this? –  Chris Valentine Jul 16 '10 at 10:36
    
@HCL, at least .Count() and .ElementAt() are optimized in LINQ for the built-in sequences that support them as fast operations. There are likely other optimizations for common use cases, but knowing those two has made me more comfortable with using IEnumerable<T> ubiquitously. –  Dan Bryant Jul 16 '10 at 11:41
show 2 more comments

As you are returning an IEnumerable<T> your contract with users of your code states that whatever you return will implement IEnumerable<T> and no more. If someone makes assumptions based on that, it is poor programming practise on their part, so don't worry about it. A locally built List<T> is fine in this scenario.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Expanding on a comment made to Marcelo Cantos answer.

Some people here are recommending using yield to guarantee that the caller only gets back the minimum implementation promised by the IEnumerable<T> contract.

However there are some potential downsides to this that need to be considered, so I don't think it should be recommended as a blanket solution in all cases.

For example, consider the following data access method that uses yield rather than returning a list:

public IEnumerable<SomeType> YieldMethod(...)
{
    using(IDbConnection connection = )
    {
        ... 
        using (IDataReader reader = ...)
        {
            while(reader.Read())
            {
                SomeType someType = ...
                ...
                yield return someType;
            }
        }
    }
}

This will behave differently from a version that returns a list in the following ways, some of which may be undesirable:

  1. If the caller enumerates the result more than once, then the database will be accessed and the result regenerated each time it is enumerated.

  2. If the caller uses the Enumerable.Count extension method, the database will be accessed and the result regenerated each time it is called.

  3. The body of the method will not be executed until the caller actually enumerates the result. This means that any data access exception won't be thrown until the caller starts enumerating. One case where this can be problematic is if the result is returned directly as the result of a WCF Web Service - in this case, any data access won't be thrown until the WCF infrastructure starts serializing the result - so that user code in the service can't handle the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
The moral of the story is that a method returning IEnumerable<T> should be clearly documented as to whether its evaluation is deferred, particularly if enumeration is expensive or has side effects. –  Dan Bryant Jul 16 '10 at 11:45
    
"should be clearly documented as to whether its evaluation is deferred" ... and if it isn't deferred, the method probably might as well return an ICollection<T> or IList<T> anyway. –  Joe Jul 16 '10 at 12:54
add comment

If you change your implementation later on, and return something other than a List<T>, the caller code will indeed break. But the author of the caller code should know better than just casting to List<T> without checking that the return value actually is a list - you have promised nothing of the sort.

As for myself, I tend to return theList.AsEnumerable(), just to be extra clear, but that is not necessary. The caller code will not know anything about what implementation of *IEnumerable<T> is returned - just that some implementation is returned.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.