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I've been using this idiom for some time now. And it seems to be the most wide-spread, at least in the sites I've visited.

Does anyone have a better/different way to read a file into a string in Java?

private String readFile( String file ) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader( new FileReader (file));
    String         line = null;
    StringBuilder  stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    String         ls = System.getProperty("line.separator");

    while( ( line = reader.readLine() ) != null ) {
        stringBuilder.append( line );
        stringBuilder.append( ls );
    }

    return stringBuilder.toString();
}
share|improve this question
3  
Can anyone explain me in a very simple way what's with the NIO? Each time I read about itI get lost in the nth mention of channel :( –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 18:33
5  
do remember that it's not guaranteed that the line separator in the file isn't necessary the same as the system's line separator. –  Henrik Paul Nov 28 '08 at 18:35
80  
Could you please insert a proper try finally that closes the reader? Someone might actually use this example and introduce a bug into his code. –  hstoerr Jun 9 '10 at 8:04
2  
Code above has a bug of adding extra new line char at the last line. It should be something like following if(line = reader.readLine() ) != null){ stringBuilder.append( line ); } while (line = reader.readLine() ) != null) { stringBuilder.append( ls ); stringBuilder.append( line ); } –  Deep Aug 12 '11 at 10:29
13  
Java 7 introduces byte[] Files.readAllBytes(file); To those, who suggest the 'one-line' Scanner solution: Don't yo need to close it? –  Val Jan 17 '12 at 15:20

18 Answers 18

Read all text from a file

Here's a compact, robust idiom for Java 7, wrapped up in a utility method:

static String readFile(String path, Charset encoding) 
  throws IOException 
{
  byte[] encoded = Files.readAllBytes(Paths.get(path));
  return new String(encoded, encoding);
}

Read lines of text from a file

Java 7 added a convenience method to read a file as lines of text, represented as a List<String>. This approach is "lossy" because the line separators are stripped from the end of each line.

List<String> lines = Files.readAllLines(Paths.get(path), encoding);

Memory utilization

The first method, that preserves line breaks, can temporarily require memory several times the size of the file, because for a short time the raw file contents (a byte array), and the decoded characters (each of which is 16 bits even if encoded as 8 bits in the file) reside in memory at once. It is safest to apply to files that you know to be small relative to the available memory.

The second method, reading lines, is usually more memory efficient, because the input byte buffer for decoding doesn't need to contain the entire file. However, it's still not suitable for files that are very large relative to available memory.

For reading large files, you need a different design for your program, one that reads a chunk of text from a stream, processes it, and then moves on to the next, reusing the same fixed-sized memory block. Here, "large" depends on the computer specs. Nowadays, this threshold might be many gigabytes of RAM.

Character encoding

One thing that is missing from the sample in the original post is the character encoding. There are some special cases where the platform default is what you want, but they are rare, and you should be able justify your choice.

The StandardCharsets class define some constants for the encodings required of all Java runtimes:

String content = readFile("test.txt", StandardCharsets.UTF_8);

The platform default is available from the Charset class itself:

String content = readFile("test.txt", Charset.defaultCharset());

Note: This answer largely replaces my Java 6 version. The utility of Java 7 safely simplifies the code, and the old answer, which used a mapped byte buffer, prevented the file that was read from being deleted until the mapped buffer was garbage collected. You can view the old version via the "edited" link on this answer.

share|improve this answer
3  
Technically speaking, it's O(n) in time and space. Qualitatively, due the immutability requirement of Strings, it's pretty hard on memory; temporarily there are two copies of the char data in memory, plus the room for the encoded bytes. Assuming some single-byte encoding, it will (temporarily) require 5 bytes of memory for each character in the file. Since the question asks specifically for a String, that's what I show, but if you can work with the CharBuffer returned by "decode", the memory requirement is much less. Time-wise, I don't think you'll find anything faster in the core Java libs. –  erickson Jun 17 '09 at 20:16
4  
Possible typo? NIO has a Charset (not CharSet) class called java.nio.charset.Charset. Is this what CharSet should have been? –  Jonathan Wright Dec 20 '09 at 22:43
23  
Note : after exercising a bit that code, I found out that you can't reliably delete the file right after reading it with this method, which may be a non issue in some case, but not mine. May it be in relation with this issue : bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4715154 ? I finally went with the proposition of Jon Skeet which doesn't suffer from this bug. Anyways, I just wanted to give the info, for other people, just in case... –  Sébastien Nussbaumer Aug 19 '10 at 15:47
5  
@Sébastien Nussbaumer: I also bumped on this problem. Amazing that the bug has been marked "Will Not Fix". This essentially means that FileChannel#map is, in general, unusable. –  Joonas Pulakka Nov 9 '10 at 7:45
3  
@Sébastien Nussbaumer: The bug has been deleted from the Oracle / Sun Bug Database: "This bug is not available." Google cached the site at webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:bugs.sun.com/… –  bobndrew Aug 1 '11 at 12:06

This one uses the method RandomAccessFile.readFully, it seems to be available from JDK 1.0 !

public static String readFileContent(String filename, Charset charset) throws IOException {
    RandomAccessFile raf = null;
    try {
        raf = new RandomAccessFile(filename, "r");
        byte[] buffer = new byte[(int)raf.length()];
        raf.readFully(buffer);
        return new String(buffer, charset);
    } finally {
        closeStream(raf);
    }
} 


private static void closeStream(Closeable c) {
    if (c != null) {
        try {
            c.close();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            // do nothing
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Guava has a method similar to the one from Commons IOUtils that Willi aus Rohr mentioned:

import com.google.common.base.Charsets;
import com.google.common.io.Files;

// ...

String text = Files.toString(new File(path), Charsets.UTF_8);

EDIT by Oscar Reyes

This is the (simplified) underlying code on the cited library:

InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
byte[] b  = new byte[file.length()];
int len = b.length;
int total = 0;

while (total < len) {
  int result = in.read(b, total, len - total);
  if (result == -1) {
    break;
  }
  total += result;
}

return new String( b , Charsets.UTF_8 );

Edit (by Jonik): The above doesn't match the source code of recent Guava versions. For the current source, see the classes Files, CharStreams, ByteSource and CharSource in com.google.common.io package.

share|improve this answer
    
This code has casting from long to int which could pop up some crazy behaviour with big files. Has extra spaces and where do you close the inputstream? –  M-T-A Apr 22 '13 at 15:42
    
@M-T-A: The stream is closed, note the use of Closer in CharSource. The code in the answer isn't the actual, current Guava source. –  Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 13:19

I cannot comment other entries yet, so I'll just leave it here.

One of best answers here (http://stackoverflow.com/a/326448/1521167):

private String readFile(String pathname) throws IOException {

File file = new File(pathname);
StringBuilder fileContents = new StringBuilder((int)file.length());
Scanner scanner = new Scanner(file);
String lineSeparator = System.getProperty("line.separator");

try {
    while(scanner.hasNextLine()) {        
        fileContents.append(scanner.nextLine() + lineSeparator);
    }
    return fileContents.toString();
} finally {
    scanner.close();
}
}

still has one flaw. It always puts new line char in the end of string, which may cause some weirds bugs. My suggestion is to change it to:

    private String readFile(String pathname) throws IOException {
    File file = new File(pathname);
    StringBuilder fileContents = new StringBuilder((int) file.length());
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file)));
    String lineSeparator = System.getProperty("line.separator");

    try {
        if (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
            fileContents.append(scanner.nextLine());
        }
        while (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
            fileContents.append(lineSeparator + scanner.nextLine());
        }
        return fileContents.toString();
    } finally {
        scanner.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There is a variation on the same theme that uses a for loop, instead of a while loop, to limit the scope of the line variable. Whether it's "better" is a matter of personal taste.

for(String line = reader.readLine(); line != null; line = reader.readLine()) {
    stringBuilder.append(line);
    stringBuilder.append(ls);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This will change the newlines to the default newline choise. This may be desirable, or unintended. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 18 '10 at 7:23
    
Rolled back the edit to this answer because the point was to narrow the scope of the line variable. The edit declared it twice, which would be a compile error. –  Dan Dyer Aug 1 '13 at 20:16

One Line Solution

List<String> list = Files.readAllLines(new File("d://test.txt").toPath(), Charset.defaultCharset() );
share|improve this answer
    
The original question was creating a single string, not a list of lines. –  Vic Jul 11 '13 at 19:40
    
Yes you are right but the best way to get first list of lines and once you are having list of line no one will face any trouble to get single line by using it. –  prashant thakre Jul 28 at 7:36

Commons FileUtils.readFileToString:

public static String readFileToString(File file)
                       throws IOException

Reads the contents of a file into a String using the default encoding for the VM. The file is always closed.

Parameters:

  • file - the file to read, must not be null

Returns:
the file contents, never null

Throws: - IOException - in case of an I/O error

Since:
Commons IO 1.3.1

Edit by Oscar Reyes

I've found the code used ( indirectly ) by that class:

IOUtils.java under Apache Licence 2.0

public static long copyLarge(InputStream input, OutputStream output)
       throws IOException {
   byte[] buffer = new byte[DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE];
   long count = 0;
   int n = 0;
   while (-1 != (n = input.read(buffer))) {
       output.write(buffer, 0, n);
       count += n;
   }
   return count;
}

Very similar to the one use by Ritche_W

share|improve this answer
    
I don't find that method in the URL you provide. –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 18:52
1  
It's in the class org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils –  Cyrille Ka Nov 28 '08 at 19:04
2  
I'm using FileUtils too, but I'm wondering what is better betwwen using FileUtils or the accepted nio answer? –  Guillaume Feb 9 '10 at 16:31
1  
@Guillaume: The biggest question is whether you're comfortable having a dependency on a 3rd party library. If you do have Commons IO or Guava in your project, then use that (just for code simplicity; otherwise there likely won't be a noticeable difference). –  Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 13:04

Be aware when using fileInputStream.available() the returned integer does not have to represent the actual file size, but rather the guessed amount of bytes the system should be able to read from the stream without blocking IO. A safe and simple way could look like this

public String readStringFromInputStream(FileInputStream fileInputStream) {
    StringBuffer stringBuffer = new StringBuffer();
    try {
        byte[] buffer;
        while (fileInputStream.available() > 0) {
            buffer = new byte[fileInputStream.available()];
            fileInputStream.read(buffer);
            stringBuffer.append(new String(buffer, "ISO-8859-1"));
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    } catch (IOException e) { }
    return stringBuffer.toString();
}

It should be considered that this approach is not suitable for multi-byte character encodings like UTF-8.

share|improve this answer
1  
This code may give unpredictable results. According to the documentation of the available() method, there is no guarantee that the end of file is reached in the event that the method returns 0. In that case you might end up with an incomplete file. What's worse, the number of bytes actually read can be smaller than the value returned by available(), in which case you get corrupted output. –  wau Mar 15 '13 at 13:32
import java.nio.file.Files;

.......

 String readFile(String filename) {
            File f = new File(filename);
            try {
                byte[] bytes = Files.readAllBytes(f.toPath());
                return new String(bytes,"UTF-8");
            } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            return "";
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
Or even more simple: new String(Files.readAllBytes(FileSystems.getDefault().getPath( filename))); –  user321068 Aug 6 '12 at 21:54
6  
or new String(Files.readAllBytes(Paths.get(filename))); :-) –  gfgqtmakia Apr 6 '13 at 12:09
    
Well played, and to save the next guy the Googling, Paths is apparently 1.7+ as is FileSystems. (Dang it!) –  ruffin Apr 9 '13 at 19:51
2  
It;s a shame this answer doesn't have more votes. I was looking for the quickest and simplest way to get a text file into a String. This is it and if I didn't scroll down and down and down, I would have missed it. The OP should consider accepting this answer to move it to the top. –  Thorn Apr 16 '13 at 4:40

A flexible solution using IOUtils from Apache commons-io in combination with StringWriter:

Reader input = new FileReader();
StringWriter output = new StringWriter();
try {
  IOUtils.copy(input, output);
} finally {
  input.close();
}
String fileContents = output.toString();

It works with any reader or input stream (not just with files), for example when reading from a URL.

share|improve this answer

If it's a text file why not use apache commons-io? http://commons.apache.org/io/apidocs/org/apache/commons/io/FileUtils.html

It has the following method

public static String readFileToString(File file) throws IOException

If you want the lines as a list use

public static List<String> readLines(File file) throws IOException
share|improve this answer

From this page the one-line solution:

 String text = new Scanner( new File("poem.txt") ).useDelimiter("\\A").next();

or

String text = new Scanner( new File("poem.txt"), "UTF-8" ).useDelimiter("\\A").next();

If you want to set the charset

share|improve this answer
1  
\\A works because there is no "other beginning of file", so you are in fact read the last token...which is also the first. Never tried with \\Z. Also note you can read anything that is Readable , like Files, InputStreams, channels...I sometimes use this code to read from the display window of eclipse, when I'm not sure if I'm reading one file or another...yes, classpath confuses me. –  Pablo Grisafi Sep 16 '11 at 20:16
1  
As the poster, I can say I really don't know if and when the file is properly close...I never write this one in production code, I use it only for tests or debug. –  Pablo Grisafi Jun 4 '12 at 17:26
2  
It has a limit of 1024 chars I think –  user1352530 Jul 4 '12 at 14:32
11  
Scanner implements Closeable (it invokes close on the source) - so while elegant it shouldn't really be a one-liner. The default size of the buffer is 1024, but Scanner will increase the size as necessary (see Scanner#makeSpace()) –  earcam Nov 23 '12 at 9:43
3  
This one fails for empty files with a java.util.NoSuchElementException. –  SpaceTrucker Aug 2 '13 at 9:16

If you're looking for an alternative that doesn't involve a 3rd party library (e.g. commons IO), you can use the Scanner class

private String readFile(String pathname) throws IOException {

    File file = new File(pathname);
    StringBuilder fileContents = new StringBuilder((int)file.length());
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(file);
    String lineSeparator = System.getProperty("line.separator");

    try {
        while(scanner.hasNextLine()) {        
            fileContents.append(scanner.nextLine() + lineSeparator);
        }
        return fileContents.toString();
    } finally {
        scanner.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I think this is the best way. Check out java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/essential/io/scanning.html –  Tarski Nov 28 '08 at 19:19
3  
The Scanner constructor that accepts a String doesn't treat the string as the name of a file to read, but as the text to be scanned. I make that mistake all the time. :-/ –  Alan Moore Nov 29 '08 at 9:10
    
@Alan, good catch. I edited Don's answer slightly to fix that (I hope). –  Jonik Apr 17 '10 at 10:12
2  
fileContents.append(scanner.nextLine()).append(lineSeparator); –  ban-geoengineering May 24 '13 at 10:53
    
Change the initialization statement to Scanner scanner = new Scanner((Readable) new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file)));. Otherwise you may only capture part of the file. –  Wei Yang Oct 22 '13 at 17:40

To read a File as binary and convert at the end

public static String readFileAsString(String filePath) throws IOException {
    DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(new FileInputStream(filePath));
    try {
        long len = new File(filePath).length();
        if (len > Integer.MAX_VALUE) throw new IOException("File "+filePath+" too large, was "+len+" bytes.");
        byte[] bytes = new byte[(int) len];
        dis.readFully(bytes);
        return new String(bytes, "UTF-8");
    } finally {
        dis.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for DataInputStream.readFully() –  icza Sep 3 at 15:09

You could try:

FileInputStream input = new FileInputStream(filePath);

byte[] fileData = new byte[input.available()];

input.read(fileData);
input.close();

return new String(fileData, "UTF-8");

I'm not sure what problems might occur with the bytes and character sets etc, but it works for me.

share|improve this answer
    
I have always wondered, is it possible that input.available() return less bytes count than those in the file; I guess with big files. –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 18:49
1  
Given the doco for read(byte[]) this is very risky code. What if the file is on a network share or SAN? Then you might get an available count of less than the file size. You need to use a readFull() method and File.length(). –  Lawrence Dol Nov 28 '08 at 18:58
1  
Actually this is very similar the way the library posted by Willi aus Rohr. Don't see why the downvote –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 19:15
14  
Problems with this code: 1) Stream is left open when there's an exception. 2) Use of available() to guess at file size (and assume it's constant). 3) Assumption that a single call to read() will read everything. 4) Use of platform-default character encoding. –  Jon Skeet Nov 28 '08 at 19:40
2  
I agree with Jon on all points. No offense intended, but this is like a checklist of what NOT to do. –  Alan Moore Nov 29 '08 at 8:55
public static String slurp (final File file)
throws IOException {
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();

    try {
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));

        char[] buf = new char[1024];

        int r = 0;

        while ((r = reader.read(buf)) != -1) {
            result.append(buf, 0, r);
        }
    }
    finally {
        reader.close();
    }

    return result.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this has the inconvenience os using the platform default encoding. +1 anyway :) –  OscarRyz Feb 9 '10 at 15:53
3  
I seems to me that the finally block does not know variables defined in the try block. javac 1.6.0_21 throws the error cannot find symbol. –  ceving Jun 25 '12 at 16:11

That code will normalize line breaks, which may or may not be what you really want to do.

Here's an alternative which doesn't do that, and which is (IMO) simpler to understand than the NIO code (although it still uses java.nio.charset.Charset):

public static String readFile(String file, String csName)
            throws IOException {
    Charset cs = Charset.forName(csName);
    return readFile(file, cs);
}

public static String readFile(String file, Charset cs)
            throws IOException {
    // No real need to close the BufferedReader/InputStreamReader
    // as they're only wrapping the stream
    FileInputStream stream = new FileInputStream(file);
    try {
        Reader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(stream, cs));
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        char[] buffer = new char[8192];
        int read;
        while ((read = reader.read(buffer, 0, buffer.length)) > 0) {
            builder.append(buffer, 0, read);
        }
        return builder.toString();
    } finally {
        // Potential issue here: if this throws an IOException,
        // it will mask any others. Normally I'd use a utility
        // method which would log exceptions and swallow them
        stream.close();
    }        
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Which one is "that" code? –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 20:00
4  
The code in the question. –  Jon Skeet Nov 28 '08 at 20:01
    
No real need to close the BufferedReader/InputStreamReader as they're only wrapping the stream +1 !!! –  Mr_and_Mrs_D May 4 '13 at 13:53
    
Forgive me for reviving a comment this old, but did you mean to pass in a String object called "file", or should that be a File object instead? –  Bryan Larson Jun 5 '13 at 19:17
    
@BryanLarson: Either's fine. –  Jon Skeet Jun 5 '13 at 19:47

Java attempts to be extremely general and flexible in all it does. As a result, something which is relatively simple in a scripting language (your code would be replaced with "open(file).read()" in python) is a lot more complicated. There doesn't seem to be any shorter way of doing it, except using an external library (like Willi aus Rohr mentioned). Your options:

  • Use an external library.
  • Copy this code into all your projects.
  • Create your own mini-library which contains functions you use often.

Your best bet is probably the 2nd one, as it has the least dependencies.

share|improve this answer
3  
Yeap. It makes the "high" level language take a different meaning. Java is high level compared with C but low compared with Python or Ruby –  OscarRyz Nov 28 '08 at 19:36
2  
Agree that Java is long on high-level abstractions but short on convenience methods –  Dónal May 11 '11 at 16:44
2  
True, Java has an insane number of ways of dealing with Files and many of them seem complicated. But this is fairly close to what we have in higher level languages: byte[] bytes = Files.readAllBytes(someFile.toPath()); –  Thorn Apr 16 '13 at 20:45

protected by Mysticial Oct 21 '13 at 20:50

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