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I have next code

int a,b,c;
b=1;
c=36;
a=b%c;

What does "%" operator mean?

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4  
modulo, or remainder after division. –  Mark H Jul 16 '10 at 11:54
2  
be aware that this operator exist in almost every language. –  mathk Jul 16 '10 at 11:58
3  
Have you done any research on it yourself ??? –  Incognito Jul 16 '10 at 12:06
1  
Yes I do. But I can search it like "%" operator and google didn't give any useful page. I didn't know that it named "modulus" –  Polaris Jul 16 '10 at 12:08
4  
@Incognito: Operators are usually not that easy to search for... –  0xA3 Jul 16 '10 at 12:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It is the modulo (or modulus) operator:

The modulus operator (%) computes the remainder after dividing its first operand by its second.

For example:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(5 % 2);       // int
        Console.WriteLine(-5 % 2);      // int
        Console.WriteLine(5.0 % 2.2);   // double
        Console.WriteLine(5.0m % 2.2m); // decimal
        Console.WriteLine(-5.2 % 2.0);  // double
    }
}

Sample output:

1
-1
0.6
0.6
-1.2

Note that the result of the % operator is equal to x – (x / y) * y and that if y is zero, a DivideByZeroException is thrown.

If x and y are non-integer values x % y is computed as x – n * y, where n is the largest possible integer that is less than or equal to x / y (more details in the C# 4.0 Specification in section 7.8.3 Remainder operator).

For further details and examples you might want to have a look at the corresponding Wikipedia article:

Modulo operation (on Wikipedia)

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1  
+1 for showing behaviours for non-ints! –  Frank Shearar Jul 16 '10 at 12:00

That is the Modulo operator. It will give you the remainder of a division operation.

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% is the remainder operator in many C-inspired languages.

3 % 2 == 1
789 % 10 = 9

It's a bit tricky with negative numbers. In e.g. Java and C#, the result has the same sign as the dividend:

-1 % 2 == -1

In e.g. C++ this is implementation defined.

See also

References

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It's the modulus operator. That is, 2 % 2 == 0, 4 % 4 % 2 == 0 (2, 4 are divisible by 2 with 0 remainder), 5 % 2 == 1 (2 goes into 5 with 1 as remainder.)

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That is the modulo operator, which finds the remainder of division of one number by another.

So in this case a will be the remainder of b divided by c.

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It is the modulo operator. i.e. it the remainder after division 1 % 36 == 1 (0 remainder 1)

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It's is modulus, but you example is not a good use of it. It gives you the remainder when two integers are divided.

e.g. a = 7 % 3 will return 1, becuase 7 divided by 3 is 2 with 1 left over.

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It is modulus operator

using System;
class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {

        int a = 2;
        int b = 6;

        int c = 12;
        int d = 5;

        Console.WriteLine(b % a);
        Console.WriteLine(c % d);
        Console.Read();
    }
}

Output:

0
2
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is basic operator available in almost every language and generally known as modulo operator. it gives remainder as result.

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Okay well I did know this till just trying on a calculator and playing around so basically: 5 % 2.2 = 0.6 is like saying on a calculator 5/2.2 = 2.27 then you multiply that .27 times the 2.27 and you round and you get 0.6 ;] Hope this helps, it helped me =]


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