Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So say I have a class like this:

class A {
    public:
        A( SomeHugeClass* huge_object)
            : m_huge_object(huge_object) {}
    private:
        SomeHugeClass* m_huge_object;        
};

If someone uses the constructor like this:

A* foo = new A(new SomeHugeClass());

Who's responsibility is it to call delete on the object newed in the constructor? In this case, the scope in which the A constructor was called can only delete foo since the SomeHugeClass is anonymous.

However, what if someone uses the constructor like this?

SomeHugeClass* hugeObj = new SomeHugeClass();
A* foo = new A(hugeObj);

Then, the caller can call delete hugeObj at some point, right?

Does this implementation of A leak memory on destruction?

I'm working on a project with a lot of object composition done this way and as much as I would love to use smart pointers, I have to talk to the project leads about changing old code to take advantage of that before I can.

share|improve this question
    
You need to initialise hugeObj in your last code snippet; otherwise, chances are you will run into undefined behaviour sometime when you use foo. –  Gorpik Jul 16 '10 at 12:51
    
^Good catch. Editing that. –  RyanG Jul 16 '10 at 12:54
1  
No one can say who should delete the pointer members in your case: we lack of some context to answer reliably. I think it depends on what does your class and what it represent. It could be a class that refers to some external data and for whose documentation specifies that its lifetime must not exceed the lifetime of the referred data. Or it could just take ownership. –  ereOn Jul 16 '10 at 13:13
1  
Who should delete it depends on who owns it. Unfortunately your constructor lacks the symantic clarity on who owns the object being passed in (this is why passing pointers is a bad idea). If you want the object to own the pointer the constructor should take a std::auto_ptr<> (this indicates a transfer of ownership). If you want to indicate that the object is a shared resource then the constructor should take a shared_ptr<>. If you want to indicate that object does not take ownership the constructor should take a reference. –  Loki Astari Jul 16 '10 at 16:07
    
In some cases in the codebase, we're passing pointers to large objects that are large subsystems of the application. I know in that case I wouldn't delete them, because my class has no idea if the application needs to die yet. (Nor should it be responsible for general cleanup.) However, we also have a class that generates words based on some rules, and its generally created on the fly and used like new SomeHugeClass() in my original post. However, I could see a case where the caller, say, instantiates two A's with the same SomeHugeClass, so one deleting it would screw with the other. –  RyanG Jul 17 '10 at 14:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I try to follow this simple rule whenever it is possible: The one who calls new should call delete as well. Otherwise the code soon becomes too messy to keep track of what is deleted and what is not.

In your case, if A::A receives the pointer, it must not delete it. Think of this simple case:

SomeHugeClass* hugeObj = new SomeHugeClass();
A * a1 = new A(hugeObj);
A * a2 = new A(hugeObj);

Class A can not know who else is using that pointer!

If you want class A to take care of the pointer, it should create it itself.

Of course, you could handle both cases, but that might be an overkill, something like this:

A::A() : own_huge_object(true) {
    m_huge_object = new SomeHugeClass();
}
A::A(SomeHugeClass * huge_object ) : own_huge_object(false) {
    m_huge_object = huge_object;
}
A::~A() { if(own_huge_object) delete m_huge_object; }
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for "The one who calls new should call delete as well". I think this makes things more elegant. However, I have to admit that Qt doesn't respect this rule, but deals with it pretty well. –  ereOn Jul 16 '10 at 13:10
    
If we followed this rule consistently, we'd have to throw out auto_ptr! I think this proves that, while it has some validity, it can be taken too far. In some cases, you want to transfer ownership. –  Steven Sudit Jul 16 '10 at 15:11

In your example caller should be responsible for deleting huge_object because constructor could throw exception and destructor of A will not be called. And your implementation has a memory leak since nobody calls delete now.

You could use shared_ptr as follows:

class A {
    public:
        A( shared_ptr<SomeHugeClass> huge_object)
            : m_huge_object(huge_object) {}
    private:
        shared_ptr<SomeHugeClass> m_huge_object;        
};

In this case you shouldn't care about deleting SomeHugeClass.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't agree regarding whose responsibility it should be, but I do agree that using smart pointers is the best answer. –  Steven Sudit Jul 16 '10 at 12:45
3  
Please no shared_ptr by default! Shared ownership should be a conscious decision. It's better to use a std::unique_ptr or a boost::scoped_ptr if you don't have access to C++0x yet. –  Matthieu M. Jul 16 '10 at 13:07
    
Every decision should be conscious. It's a bad idea just to copy-paste code from Internet (even from SO). I've added the link, so OP could read more about shared_ptr. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 16 '10 at 13:45
    
This article (devx.com/cplus/10MinuteSolution/39071/1954) suggests that auto_ptr should be replaced by unique_ptr, which makes me glad I generally endorsed smart pointers as a concept without specifying an implementation. –  Steven Sudit Jul 16 '10 at 13:53

In order for this line below

A* foo = new A(new SomeHugeClass());

not to result in memory leak, you can make sure to free memory pointed to by m_huge_object in the destructor of class A.

The class A definition can look something like below:

class A {
  public:
    A(SomeHugeClass* huge_object)
        : m_huge_object(huge_object) {}
    ~A() { delete m_huge_object; }
  private:
    SomeHugeClass* m_huge_object;        
};

What I don't like about the above is that I prefer whoever allocates memory should also be the one responsible to free that memory. Also, there's the problem that Kirill pointed out. So keep your definition of class A, and the code can be as simple as:

SomeHugeClass* hugeObj = new SomeHugeClass();
A* foo = new A(hugeObj); 
//some code
delete hugeObj;
delete foo;
share|improve this answer
    
This is not good. It may well be that the destructor of foo has to reference hugeObj, so you've just caused an exception. –  Steven Sudit Jul 16 '10 at 15:13
    
@Steven Sudit: Which one? If you take the second version, it's the same code that the poster had in the first place, i.e. no destructor (which is what I said). –  Khnle - Kevin Le Jul 16 '10 at 16:38
    
You effectively stated that, in the second version, ~A does not delete m_hugeObj. You then showed hugeObj being destructed after foo, even though foo was constructed second. This is very wrong. I gave an example of why it is wrong: foo has m_hugeObj, which points to the same instance as hugeObj does, and may be expected to use this pointer for its entire lifespan. Despite this, you pull the rug out from under foo by deleting hugeObj, leaving its m_hugeObj pointing to an invalid location. –  Steven Sudit Jul 16 '10 at 17:00
    
I think you misunderstood. I was pointing that if the poster keeps his original code, that's the code with no destructor, then he would have to delete each variable that he newed. –  Khnle - Kevin Le Jul 17 '10 at 4:22

This is more a design problem. Traditionnaly, when you pass non-const pointers to a constructor, the object should release the pointer. Pass a const reference if you intend to keep a copy.

An alternate design is something along these lines: SomeHugeClass typically is not that huge (eg. a pointer), but owns a huge amount of memory:

class A
{
    SomeHugeClass m_;

public:
    A(SomeHugeClass x) { m_.swap(x); }
};

This design is possible if SomeHugeClass implements an efficient swap (swapping the pointers). The constructor makes a copy of x before swapping it into m_, and if you pass a temporary object to the constructor, the copy may be (and usually will be) elided by the compiler.

Note that SomeHugeClass can be replaced here by smart_pointer<SomeHugeClass> giving the semantics you want when you pass smart_pointer(new SomeHugeClass()) to the constructor, since it is temporary.

EDIT (for clarity...): Final code may look like

class A
{
    smart_ptr<SHC> m_;

public:
    A(smart_ptr<SHC> x) { m_.swap(x); }
};

which has the required behavior when you call A(new SHC(...)) (no copy, and deletion when A gets destructed), and when you call A(smart_ptr<SHC>(a)) (copy of a is performed, and released when A gets destructed).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.