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When making changes using SubmitChanges(), LINQ sometimes dies with a ChangeConflictException exception with the error message Row not found or changed, without any indication of either the row that has the conflict or the fields with changes that are in conflict, when another user has changed some data in that row.

Is there any way to determine which row has a conflict and which fields they occur in, and also is there a way of getting LINQ to ignore the issue and simply commit the data regardless?

Additionally, does anybody know whether this exception occurs when any data in the row has changed, or only when data has been changed in a field that LINQ is attempting to alter?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Here's a way to see where the conflicts are (this is an MSDN example, so you'll need to heavily customize):

try
{
    db.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
}
catch (ChangeConflictException e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Optimistic concurrency error.");
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
    Console.ReadLine();
    foreach (ObjectChangeConflict occ in db.ChangeConflicts)
    {
        MetaTable metatable = db.Mapping.GetTable(occ.Object.GetType());
        Customer entityInConflict = (Customer)occ.Object;
        Console.WriteLine("Table name: {0}", metatable.TableName);
        Console.Write("Customer ID: ");
        Console.WriteLine(entityInConflict.CustomerID);
        foreach (MemberChangeConflict mcc in occ.MemberConflicts)
        {
            object currVal = mcc.CurrentValue;
            object origVal = mcc.OriginalValue;
            object databaseVal = mcc.DatabaseValue;
            MemberInfo mi = mcc.Member;
            Console.WriteLine("Member: {0}", mi.Name);
            Console.WriteLine("current value: {0}", currVal);
            Console.WriteLine("original value: {0}", origVal);
            Console.WriteLine("database value: {0}", databaseVal);
        }
    }
}

To make it ignore the problem and commit anyway:

db.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
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I'm going to have to add this to my code. I just pushed out an application that ran into a "Row not found" exception. –  Benjamin Autin Dec 19 '08 at 22:52
6  
Careful there, ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict does not make it commit anyway, what it does is let it try to do ALL the updates, so you get ALL the conflicts at once, rather than stop on the first one, but it does rollback anyway. –  Daniel Magliola Mar 26 '09 at 14:02
4  
To make it ignore the problem, you need to call ResolveAll(KeepChanges) on your catch{} –  Daniel Magliola Mar 26 '09 at 14:03
    
Holy crap, how did I not know about the ChangeConflicts property before now?? Oh, the time and sanity I could've saved! AAUUGH! –  Daniel Schaffer Jan 31 '11 at 23:13
    
Should this code have ContinueOnConflict or FailOnConflict? –  tofutim May 23 '13 at 17:39
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These (which you could add in a partial class to your datacontext might help you understand how this works:

public void SubmitKeepChanges()
{
    try
    {
        this.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
    }
    catch (ChangeConflictException e)
    {
        foreach (ObjectChangeConflict occ in this.ChangeConflicts)
        {
            //Keep current values that have changed, 
//updates other values with database values

            occ.Resolve(RefreshMode.KeepChanges);
        }
    }
}

public void SubmitOverwrite()
{
    try
    {
        this.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
    }
    catch (ChangeConflictException e)
    {
        foreach (ObjectChangeConflict occ in this.ChangeConflicts)
        {
            // All database values overwrite current values with 
//values from database

            occ.Resolve(RefreshMode.OverwriteCurrentValues);
        }
    }
}

public void SubmitKeepCurrent()
{
    try
    {
        this.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
    }
    catch (ChangeConflictException e)
    {
        foreach (ObjectChangeConflict occ in this.ChangeConflicts)
        {
            //Swap the original values with the values retrieved from the database. No current value is modified
            occ.Resolve(RefreshMode.KeepCurrentValues);
        }
    }
}
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1  
You'll need to use System.Data.Linq and System.Data.Linq.Mapping. –  mattruma Dec 1 '08 at 23:37
    
@vzczc, you are the man. I have been struggling with how to deal with these exceptions for days and this helped me accomplish exactly what I needed to do since there are cases where I want the client's data to overwrite values in the DB. –  Grasshopper Jan 27 '13 at 18:26
    
This is my first time using Linq and if I could do it all over again, I would not leave the data context open during the life of app. –  Grasshopper Jan 27 '13 at 18:27
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I've gotten this error in a circumstance completely unrelated to what the error message describes.

What I did was load a LINQ object via one DataContext, and then tried to SubmitChanges() for the object via a different DataContext - gave this exact same error.

What I had to do was call DataContext.Table.Attach(myOldObject), and then call SubmitChanges(), worked like a charm.

Worth a look, especially if you're of the opinion that there really shouldn't be any conflicts at all.

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The error "Row not found or changed" also will appear sometimes when the columns or types in the O/R-Designer do not match the columns in the SQL database, especially if one column is NULLable in SQL but not nullable in the O/R-Designer.

So check if your table mapping in the O/R-Designer matches your SQL database!

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Thanks to @vzczc. I found the example you gave very helpful but that I needed to call SubmitChanges again after resolving. Here are my modified methods - hope it helps someone.

    /// <summary>
    /// Submits changes and, if there are any conflicts, the database changes are auto-merged for 
    /// members that client has not modified (client wins, but database changes are preserved if possible)
    /// </summary>
    public void SubmitKeepChanges()
    {
        this.Submit(RefreshMode.KeepChanges);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Submits changes and, if there are any conflicts, simply overwrites what is in the database (client wins).
    /// </summary>
    public void SubmitOverwriteDatabase()
    {
        this.Submit(RefreshMode.KeepCurrentValues);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Submits changes and, if there are any conflicts, all database values overwrite
    /// current values (client loses).
    /// </summary>
    public void SubmitUseDatabase()
    {
        this.Submit(RefreshMode.OverwriteCurrentValues);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Submits the changes using the specified refresh mode.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="refreshMode">The refresh mode.</param>
    private void Submit(RefreshMode refreshMode)
    {
        bool moreToSubmit = true;
        do
        {
            try
            {
                this.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
                moreToSubmit = false;
            }
            catch (ChangeConflictException)
            {
                foreach (ObjectChangeConflict occ in this.ChangeConflicts)
                {
                    occ.Resolve(refreshMode);
                }
            }
        }
        while (moreToSubmit);

    }
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Those methods are not complete? Would you not want to retry the submit or wrap it in some kind of loop otherwise there remains no guarantee that the changes are comitted upon conflict?

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"and also is there a way of getting LINQ to ignore the issue and simply commit the data regardless?"

You can set the 'Update Check' property on your entity to 'Never' to stop that field being used for optimistic concurrency checking.

You can also use:

db.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict)
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1  
ContinueOnConflict won't make LINQ ignore it. It'll let it continue, throw all the exceptions, and then roll it all back. –  Daniel Magliola Mar 26 '09 at 14:04
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