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Here's the code I'm using :

public class splitText {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String x = "I lost my Phone. I shouldn't drive home alone";
    String[] result = x.split(".");
    for (String i : result) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
}
}

Compiles perfectly, but nothing happens at runtime. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
"Compiles perfectly, but nothing happens at runtime." - This may break your heart but just because it compiles, doesn't mean it work. – polygenelubricants Jul 16 '10 at 13:47
    
Aww no.. please tell me you're joking. :P – MoonStruckHorrors Jul 16 '10 at 14:38
1  
the computer (almost) always does exactly what you told him to do... not necessarily what you want him to do... – Carlos Heuberger Nov 5 '10 at 9:11
up vote 7 down vote accepted

String.split(String regex) takes a regular-expression pattern. It just so happens that . in regex is a metacharacter that matches (almost) any character, hence why split(".") doesn't work the way you expected.

You can escape the . by preceding it with a backslash. As a Java string literal, this is "\\.". The \ is doubled because \ itself is a Java escape character. "\\." is a String of length 2, containing a backslash and a period.

If you're given an arbitrary String that is to be matched literally (or if you just don't care to escape them yourself), you can use Pattern.quote. It'll make a pattern to literally match a given String.

See also


This is provided for educational purposes only:

    String text =
        "Wait a minute... what?!? Oh yeah! This is awesome!!";

    for (String part : text.split("(?<=[.?!]) ")) {
        System.out.println(part);
    }

This prints:

Wait a minute...
what?!?
Oh yeah!
This is awesome!!

References

Related questions

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the example :) – sly7_7 Jul 16 '10 at 13:29
    
""\\." is a String of length 2, containing a backslash and a period." Umm.. I didn't get that. Can anyone re-explain it? – MoonStruckHorrors Jul 16 '10 at 14:37
1  
@MoonStruckHorrors: A String s = "\n"; contains one character, the newline character. "\t" contains a tab. "\\" contains a backslash. "\"" contains a double quote. This is called an escape sequence. So since "\\" contains a backslash, "\\." contains a backslash and a period. You can print it out and check its length() to confirm. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/3224337/doubt-about-java-char – polygenelubricants Jul 16 '10 at 14:45
    
Thanks. But doesn't that mean it'll split the string at \. and not . ? – MoonStruckHorrors Jul 16 '10 at 14:52
1  
@MoonStruck: the regular expression pattern \. matches a literal period. The regular expression pattern . matches (almost) any character. So the pattern a.b matches strings like "axb", "a!b", etc. The pattern a\.b matches only "a.b". – polygenelubricants Jul 16 '10 at 15:10

String.split uses a regex, so dot (.) means "anything". You need to escape the dot

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String x = "I lost my Phone. I shouldn't drive home alone";
    String[] result = x.split("\\.");
    for (String i : result) {
        System.out.println(i.trim());
    }
}

gives :

I lost my Phone
I shouldn't drive home alone
share|improve this answer

Try

String [] result = x.split("\\.");

Split takes in a pattern, not a character to split on. The "." is treated special in patterns.

share|improve this answer

If you don't want to use regex, you can use the Splitter of guava lib

http://guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/index.html

 String x = "I lost my Phone. I shouldn't drive home alone";
 Splitter.on('.').trimResults().split(x)

moreover, the result is an Iterable, not an array

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Guava =) – polygenelubricants Jul 16 '10 at 13:31

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