Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running Fedora 13 if that matters.

I looked up man pages on unix(7), setsockopt, and send/recv.

Reading the man pages seems to more or less tell me that not all options are guaranteed to do ANYTHING... and apparently only a few that do/don't work are actually documented.

In particular... I wanted to see if timeouts were possible. At least on my system, SO_RCVTIMEO actually sets a timout for the recv family of calls... but SO_SNDTIMEO puts the socket seems to set it to non-blocking mode w/ no timeout.

So my question is... what can I do to workaround the fact that setsockopt isn't a reliable way to work with timeouts on AF_UNIX sockets?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

what can I do to workaround the fact that setsockopt isn't a reliable way to work with timeouts on AF_UNIX sockets?

Well, don't use them.

I used epoll(4) in G-WAN (a Web App. Server) and had to face the same issue.

There are basically three ways to handle time-outs:

  1. timers (if you don't care about interrupting your code like a fool)
  2. polling (a dedicated thread with a loop to check fds, takes time)
  3. time-outs (like epoll_wait() with a time-out value, slows-down all)

Some use pipes to wake-up the fds you want to act on. My tests have shown that it is a tremendous waste of resources. Whatever you do, this will be either inefficient or tricky. Sometimes, both (thanks to idiotic kernel developers).

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

Hmm, how about select(2) or poll(2) or epoll(4) with a timeout?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.