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I have a grid something like this:

  A A A A A
B C C C C C
B C C C C C
B C C C C C
B C C C C C
B C C C C C

Each A and B are numeric values derived from creating a bit array from some other work going on elsewhere in the worksheets.

In C, I need to perform a bitwise AND on the intersecting A and B and test if the result is greater than zero (i.e., there's at least one matching bit value of "1").

This must be a pure Excel formula, can't use macros--it is used in a conditional format. Using macros to simulate conditional formatting is not an option, nor is creating a table that duplicates C and uses a macro to store the answer that the conditional formatting can look at.

The values for A and B could be stored as a string with 1's and 0's if some string magic is easier to perform.

Any ideas?

edit

The accepted answer gives me what I need, but for posterity, here's how to extend it to extend that solution to give bitwise answers back:

AND = SUBSTITUTE(SUBSTITUTE(TEXT(VALUE($A2)+VALUE(B$1),"1","0"),"2","1")
OR = SUBSTITUTE(TEXT(VALUE($A2)+VALUE(B$1),"2","1")
XOR = SUBSTITUTE(TEXT(VALUE($A2)+VALUE(B$1),"2","0")
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is the number of bits fixed? –  mvds Jul 16 '10 at 16:51
    
The number of bits in A and B are the same, but not fixed. Will range from 1 to ~30, depending on the spreadsheet (the sheet is generated on the server and the number of bits varies from one export to another). –  richardtallent Jul 16 '10 at 17:35
    
I'm just curious as to why no VBA here. Is it just a speed thing? You can certainly write a VBA function and call it from a conditional format rule. –  jtolle Jul 16 '10 at 18:28
    
@jtolle: My Excel files are server-generated by a custom XML Spreadsheet library or binary via NPOI, and thus can't contain macros. My users have an add-in installed with utility functions, but if I attempt to call an add-in function from a conditional formatting rule, I get the error "You may not use references to other worksheets or workbooks for Conditional Formatting criteria." However, the formats can refer to a cell that is then dependent on the add-in function that creates the bit arrays for A and B. –  richardtallent Jul 16 '10 at 19:25
    
I like the summary. If the dec2bin and bin2dec are available by default, which I think is the case for newer versions, we would have true bitwise operators. –  mvds Jul 16 '10 at 20:17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

save it as a string of 0 and 1, add them as numbers together, convert that to string and look for a 2.

=ISNUMBER(SEARCH("2",TEXT(VALUE($A2)+VALUE(B$1),"0")))

copy in cell B2 with data in A2 and B1, then copy&paste around.

edit: Wow! they have put in a function DEC2BIN()!

=ISNUMBER(SEARCH("2",TEXT(VALUE(DEC2BIN($A2))+VALUE(DEC2BIN(B$1)),"0")))

and leave them numbers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Elegant. Love it. DEC2BIN() is only available with the Analysis ToolPak add-in, but the first example will do the trick. Edited to add some detail for actually implementing Boolean operators. –  richardtallent Jul 16 '10 at 17:55
    
Follow-up question: I would expect FIND() to be faster than SEARCH() since FIND() is case-sensitive and has no wildcard support. Any particular reason for SEARCH()? Also, FIND/SEARCH will implicitly convert the sum of A and B to a string, so no need for TEXT(). –  richardtallent Jul 16 '10 at 19:27
    
I have a basic ms office installed on a mac - nothing special. maybe newer versions come with dec2bin? as for find/search, sounds like you could be right. But in excel, when performance comes into play, run away! –  mvds Jul 16 '10 at 20:15
    
One issue found-- since the number is being stored in decimal, only up to 15 digits are supported. After that Excel loses significant digits trying to add the numbers. –  richardtallent Jul 16 '10 at 20:19
    
try to mix in 3 bits per digit then ;-) –  mvds Jul 16 '10 at 20:37
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What about =(A + B) > 0 if you're doing OR (which you're describing) or =(A + B) > 1 if you're doing AND (like you're actually writing).

share|improve this answer
    
2 & 1 == 0 vs. (2 + 1) > 0 –  Mark Rushakoff Jul 16 '10 at 16:49
    
Good point, I guess I was thinking in pure binary there –  Eric Andres Jul 16 '10 at 16:50
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