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In the following query:

SELECT column1,column2 FROM table1 ORDER BY column1 LIMIT 0,30

How can I find out the number of rows that would have been returned were it not for the LIMIT?

Edit: I am looking for a way to work this into the query above and not do a separate query. (If possible.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you do this query:

 SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS column1,column2 FROM table1 ORDER BY column1 LIMIT 0,30;

You can retrieve the number of rows the previous SELECT found with

select FOUND_ROWS();

If you really must do it with one query, you'll have to use a sub select (which'll have the disatvantage of adding an extra column to every row..)

 SELECT column1,column2,s.total FROM table1,
    (select count(*) as total from table1) s 
 ORDER BY column1 LIMIT 0,30;
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Ah, this looks like what I'll have to do. –  Nathan Osman Jul 16 '10 at 17:21
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table1;
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Is this part of my query above, or a separate query? I knew how to do this... I was hoping for a way to work it into my existing query. –  Nathan Osman Jul 16 '10 at 17:12
    
@George Edison: Separate query - standard SQL requires you to define a GROUP BY clause for columns that don't use aggregate functions (COUNT, MIN, MAX, etc) in the SELECT clause, which would affect your resultset. –  OMG Ponies Jul 16 '10 at 17:14
    
What would that look like anyway? –  Nathan Osman Jul 16 '10 at 17:16
    
well, you could do it like: SELECT column1,column2, (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table1) AS rows FROM table1 ORDER BY column1 LIMIT 0,30; but I think that is less efficient. –  Johan Jul 16 '10 at 17:24
1  
@Johan: True, but it's going to add the same value to every row returned. –  OMG Ponies Jul 16 '10 at 17:27

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