Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to declare an enum variable as a class member and need to define a setter and getter for that like a java bean. something like this -

public class Vehicle {
 private String id;
 private String name;
 enum color {
   RED, GREEN, ANY;
 }
 // setter and getters
} 

Now, I want to set color property as red, green or any from some other class and want to make decisions accordingly.

share|improve this question
    
That's not a question! :) –  Carl Smotricz Jul 16 '10 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The enum will have to be made public to be seen by the outside world:

public class Vehicle {
     private String id;
     private String name;

     public enum Color {
       RED, GREEN, ANY;
     };

     private Color color;    

     public Color getColor(){
        return color; 
     }

     public void setColor(Color color){
         this.color = color;
     }   

    } 

Then from outside the package you can do:

vehicle.setColor(Vehicle.Color.GREEN);

if you only need to use Vehicle.Color inside the same package as Vehicle you may remove the public from the enum declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
Guess you are good at enum usage could you help me in this link:stackoverflow.com/q/14252822/1503130 –  prateek Jan 10 '13 at 9:16

If you want to work with your color enum, you have to share its declaration more widely than you're doing. The simplest might be to put public in front of enum color in Vehicle.

Next, you need to declare a field of the enum's type. I suggest you change the name of the enum from color to Color, because it's basically a class anyway. Then you can declare a field: private Color color among with your other fields.

To use the enum and especially its constants from another class, you need to be aware that the enum is nested in Vehicle. You need to qualify all names, so:

Vehicle.Color myColor = Vehicle.Color.RED;

Bakkal has kindly written code to demonstrate much of what I was talking about. See his answer for details!

share|improve this answer
    
it's a his, nice to meet you :) –  bakkal Jul 16 '10 at 17:58
1  
I was't quite sure from the photo and didn't want to offend you ;) –  Carl Smotricz Jul 16 '10 at 18:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.