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Right now we have a large perl application that is using raw DBI to connect to MySQL and execute SQL statements. It creates a connection each time and terminates. Were starting to approach mysql's connection limit (200 at once)

It looks like DBIx::Connection supports application layer connection pooling.

Has anybody had any experience with DBIx::Connection?. Are there any other considerations for connection pooling?

I also see mod_dbd which is an Apache mod that looks like it handles connection pooling. http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.1/mod/mod_dbd.html

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I use DBIx::Connector (what DBIx::Class uses internally) and it's wonderful... I pool these connections with a Moose object wrapper that hands back existing object instances if the connection parameters are identical. It's not difficult to roll your own. –  Ether Jul 16 '10 at 18:58
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@Ether - worth an answer, IMHO –  DVK Jul 16 '10 at 20:37
    
@DVK: ok, I expanded on this with an answer... –  Ether Jul 16 '10 at 20:51
    
@Ether, your comment should have been an answer so that it could be accepted since it's exactly what the OP asked. –  mpeters Jul 16 '10 at 20:58
    
what is raw DBI, how does it differ from DBI? –  vol7ron Aug 14 '10 at 18:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I don't have any experience with DBIx::Connection, but I use DBIx::Connector (what DBIx::Class uses internally) and it's wonderful...

I pool these connections with a Moose object wrapper that hands back existing object instances if the connection parameters are identical (this would work the same for any underlying DB object):

package MyApp::Factory::DatabaseConnection;
use strict;
use warnings;

use Moose;

# table of database name -> connection objects
has connection_pool => (
    is => 'ro', isa => 'HashRef[DBIx::Connector]',
    traits  => ['Hash'],
    handles => {
        has_pooled_connection => 'exists',
        get_pooled_connection => 'get',
        save_pooled_connection => 'set',
    },
    default => sub { {} },
);

sub get_connection
{
    my ($this, %options) = @_;

    # some application-specific parsing of %options here...

    my $obj;
    if ($options{reuse})
    {
        # extract the last-allocated connection for this database and pass it
        # back, if there is one.
        $obj = $this->get_pooled_connection($database);
    }

    if (not $obj or not $obj->connected)
    {
        # look up connection info based on requested database name
        my ($dsn, $username, $password) = $this->get_connection_info($options{database});
        $obj = DBIx::Connector->new($dsn, $username, $password);

        return unless $obj;

        # Save this connection for later reuse, possibly replacing an earlier
        # saved connection (this latest one has the highest chance of being in
        # the same pid as a subsequent request).
        $this->save_pooled_connection($database, $obj) unless $options{nosave};
    }

    return $obj;
}
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Just making sure: you know about DBI->connect_cached(), right? It's a drop-in replacement for connect() that reuses dbh's, where possible, over the life of your perl script. Maybe your problem is solvable by adding 7 characters :)

And, MySQL's connections are relatively cheap. Running with your DB at max_connections=1000 or more won't by itself cause problems. (If your clients are demanding more work than your DB can handle, that's a more serious problem, one which a lower max_connections might put off but of course not solve.)

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I think free version of MySql only supports 200 connections right? –  bonez Sep 2 '10 at 13:58
    
The free version of MySQL isn't crippled in any way. (Unless you count the GPL, haha.) Even large and poorly-written applications shouldn't need more than a couple thousand, but you can set max_connections as high as you want, if you have the memory and file descriptors. –  Jamie McCarthy Sep 6 '10 at 13:23

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