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Suppose there were several projects mostly maintained by smart interns, who eventually leave after a period of time. Scripts are used here and there in key parts, for example, to back up a database, rename it, zip it, move it over ssh, unzip it, and then to restore it with different settings. You know, the scripting stuff.

The programming languages for the application side is set, but those for scripts have been relaxed. Currently there are probably healthy mix of bash and .bat file, and maybe some Perl.

1) To avoid language proliferation, and 2) because I don't want to force bash upon future Windows programmers, I'd like to set an "official" scripting language.

Google picked Python for this, and it's famous for being readable, easy to learn, and having good library; however, I personally don't find it that readable compared to C-like grammar, Pascal, or Ruby.

In any case, if you were to be forced to use only one scripting language on a Windows machine (with Cygwin if you want to) for all scripting, what would you like it to be, and why?

Related religious wars:

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closed as primarily opinion-based by eldarerathis, cHao, Bill Woodger, Chris, sethvargo Feb 12 '14 at 2:57

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

up vote 15 down vote accepted

PowerShell - designed from the ground up to be a Windows scripting language, and it can hook into the CLR for advanced functionality.

(yes, I realize this doesn't run under cygwin... but why is that a requirement?)

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I meant to say that Cygwin is available for ssh and other things if needed. – Eugene Yokota Nov 28 '08 at 22:15
    
Not a problem. Google for "powershell ssh". – dkretz Nov 28 '08 at 22:19

I'll try to provide an alternative - JavaScript and VBScript work fine too even on Windows versions long gone, and they don't need a seperate installation like PowerShell. ;) Of course, PowerShell has more power :P

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When I've written cross-platform product installers, coding a UNIX shell script for Linux/Mac/Solaris etc. is really easy, but trying to do equivalent tasks in BAT is like working in the dark, underwater, with both hands tied behind your back. I can't state strongly enough that BAT scripts are a blight on humanity.

So what I've heard about PowerShell makes me happy. It's a life-saver for Windows developers. The only trouble is that I believe it's still a separate install, it isn't available by default (I've read that it'll be on Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7).

Oh well, it only took Microsoft 20 years to replace BAT scripts with something as capable as UNIX shell, so I guess I shouldn't be too ungrateful! >:-P

Get the installer for PowerShell here:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/management/powershell/download.mspx

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I'd urge you to give Python a chance. It looks a little odd to 'C' programmers at first, but its easy to pick up and more importantly easy to remember. You are going to have interns of various skill levels using and modifying the code so you want something that can draw from a wide user base. And if you are going to go to the trouble of installing something new why choose powershell which is going to be a dead end for anyone using it.

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Powershell. It's got the breadth and the depth, and is fully supported (now and in the future.) Unlike Cygwin, for instance.

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Gah. I was going to say "powershell" but I was too busy coding powershell to send my answer here, that 2 other people beat me to it.

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The best scripting language I have come across for interface and control type applications in Windows is AutoHotKey. Anyone developing on windows should learn about this language... It can save you an enormous amount of time just automating retarded windows tasks...

One of the most useful tools I have come across for Windows is Texter

This utility is written in AutoHotKey and saves me from having to type anything more than a few times... An indispensable tool for a coder or anyone filling in forms or tickets...!

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For your particular description, PowerShell sounds like a good way to go ... but I would make a strong case for JScript under WSH (or JavaScript under Rhino/etc.). Sounds like you like CYGWIN, but Powershell does not currently have support for other platforms (too much native stuff I think -- that's a separate discussion IMO, but Google should answer it).

I pretty much make the case here: http://mikesharp.wordpress.com/2011/04/03/jquery-for-administrators/

Some highlights:

  • JavaScript is installed by default on every Windows OS after '95
  • JScript scripts work "out of the box" with Active Directory
  • ECMAScript is an open standard (which JScript is an implementation of)
  • Through ActiveX/COM JScript can do most of what Powershell can do and under Rhino it has the power of Java
  • Can be used to create HTA applications (and later, metro apps with WinRT/HTML5)

JScript doesn't have direct access to the .NET framework -- although there are a few 3rd party JavaScript engines in pure .NET that interpret it and can share objects with it like Jurassic and IronJS. Also wrappers like JavaScriptDotNet (around Chrome/V8). Powershell will likely be faster than JScript under WSH, but the same might not be said of other 3rd party interpreters.

Just please don't go with VBScript (lacking try/catch, no real OOP, proprietary, deprecated, etc.).

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If you are like me and want to display nifty progress bars or splash screens while your script is doing it's magic (instead of a black/gray command prompt window), use AutoHotkey. Showing a progress bar is a PITA with JScript/VBScript (WSH) and/or PowerShell from what I've found. In AHK it's as simple as:

Progress, b2 m, ACME App, Doing some magic...

Also you can interact with almost any control in any window and automate apps which are not meant to be automated.

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