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Would you throw an IllegalStateException if:

  1. A method is unable to do its job because of the value(s) of one or more fields
  2. Those fields are final and assigned only in the constructor?

Textbook example: your class is an immutable Collection<BigInteger> and your method is supposed to return the maximum element, but this instance is empty.

I have read Kevin Bourillon`s blog post on the subject and I am not sure which rule applies.

UnsupportedOperationException - this means that the method invoked will always fail for an instance of this class (concrete type), regardless of how the instance was constructed.

Definitely not. Many instances of this class are not empty and the operation would have succeeded.

IllegalStateException - ... there does exist at least one alternate state that the instance in question could have been in, which would have passed the check ... <snip> ... Note also that this exception is appropriate whether or not it is possible to actually mutate this aspect of the instance's state, or it's already too late.

Not quite. This instance was constructed with zero length, so this instance is not and could never have been non-empty.

IllegalArgumentException - throwing this exception implies that there exists at least one other value for this parameter that would have caused the check in question to pass.

Might apply if the parameter in question is the implicit this parameter. This is the exception I am tempted to throw, but I am concerned that it could be confusing.


Update: changed example from Collection<Integer> to Collection<BigInteger> because the fact that there was an identity element (Integer.MIN_VALUE) distracts from the question.

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There are two different things in this question. One is to have an utility method, that returns the maximum of a given collection ( which as Jon points, is just like Collections.max method ) The other is in your question title, an immutable object having a max method, returning either, the max value of a delegated object, or the from himself. This second scenario is the one I'm answering stackoverflow.com/questions/3267958/… – OscarRyz Jul 16 '10 at 20:08
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think IllegalStateException is appropriate here. The instance could have been in the correct state, if it was constructed correctly (i.e. the "it's already too late" part).

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1  
In that case it should be illegal argument exception but when you realize the object is being constructed incorrectly. – OscarRyz Jul 16 '10 at 19:57
1  
@OscarRyz That is only true if none of its methods could handle the given state. If getMax() is the only function for which the state is illegal, I would say IllegalStateException is appropriate. – ILMTitan Jul 16 '10 at 20:22
2  
ILM Mhh yeap, you're right about it, but I that case I would rather use UnsupportedOperationException but that's tricky ..mmmhh what about.. UnsopporteOperationCausedByIllegalStateOriginatedByIllegalArgumentException :) – OscarRyz Jul 16 '10 at 21:09

It doesn't sound like any of the common exception classes you mention above fit into the Textbook example.

You should throw a NoSuchElementException as that's exactly what the Collections.max() method does.

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3  
+1 for finding some "prior art". – Eric Petroelje Jul 16 '10 at 18:58
    
I don't generally like using exception values like -1 but in this case there is an identity element: Integer.MIN_VALUE. That just shows I picked a bad example, so I'm going to edit the question to refer to BigInteger instead of Integer :-) – finnw Jul 16 '10 at 19:05
5  
+1 to NoSuchElementException, but the return -1 is a bad idea. So is returning Integer.MIN_VALUE, which if returned would still not tell you whether there actually WAS a maximum value or not (what about a Collection containing only Integer.MIN_VALUE? Null is a better choice than both but not as good as an exception IMO. – Mark Peters Jul 16 '10 at 19:26
    
By the way, NoSuchElementException is what Iterator.next() throws too, if you go past the end. They're conceptually similar: there's nothing I could give you to satisfy your request. – Mark Peters Jul 16 '10 at 19:29
6  
Arrgghh! Return -1 for a method supposed to return a maximum value? Arrgghhhh! – DJClayworth Jul 16 '10 at 19:47

If the state of the class is valid (empty collection), the max element is just null. If the state is not valid, an IllegalArgumentException should have been thrown at construction time.

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+1 exactly . .. – OscarRyz Jul 16 '10 at 19:57

IllegalStateException comes closest to what you want: "this exception is appropriate whether or not it is possible to actually mutate this aspect of the instance's state".

Not UnsupportedOperationException, since it might succeed for some instance of that class, and throwing IllegalArgumentException for a method that (presumably) takes no arguments will certainly confuse people.

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But an immutable object has only one state... :-/ – OscarRyz Jul 16 '10 at 19:58
    
No, it has only one ACCESSIBLE state. See the second cause of my first sentence. – DJClayworth Jul 16 '10 at 20:29

Is IllegalStateException appropriate for an immutable object?

No, because immutable objects only have one state, and could not have pased from one legal state to another.

So, you're constructing an immutable object, and your object should have a max method

class YourObject {
    public BigInteger max(){ ... }
}

I this case IllegalAgumentException should be the correct, but not until the method is executed, but when the object is created!

So, in this scenario, if you have an immutable collection of bigintegers, and you create it with zero elements you are receiving an "invalid argument" upon the collection creation, that's when you have to throw the exception.

I agree with Jon, if your use case, or in you analysis, you're willing to support the rest of the operations, you could throw NoSuchElementException, but I think that would be to postpone the problem. Better would be to avoid the object creation in first place.

So, throwing IllegalArgumentException would be like:

  // this is my immutable object class
  final class YourObject {
      private final Collection<BigInteger> c;
      public YourObject( BigInteger ... values ) {
          if( values.length == 0 ) { 
              throw new IllegalAgumentException("Must specify at least one value");
          }
          ... initialize the rest... 
      }
      public BigInteger max() {
          // find and return the max will always work 
      }
   } 

Client:

   YourObject o  = new YourObject(); // throws IllegalArgumentException 
   // the rest is not executed....
   doSomething( o ) ; 
   ...
   doSomething( YourObject o ) {
        BigInteger maximum = o.max();
   }

In this case you don't need to check for anything in doSomething because the program would fail at the instance creation, which in turn would be fixed at development time.

Throwing NoSuchElementException would be like:

  final class YourObject {
      private final Collection<BigInteger> c;
      public YourObject( BigInteger ... values ) {
           // not validating the input  :-/ oh oh.. 
          ... initialize the rest... 
      }
      public BigInteger max() {
          if( c.isEmpty() ) { throw NoSuchElementException(); }
          // find and return the max will always work after this line
      }
   } 

Client:

   YourObject o  = new YourObject(); // it says nothing
   doSomething( o ) ;
   ...
   doSomething( YourObject o ) {
        BigInteger maximum = o.max();// ooops!, why? what?...  
        // your object client will start questioning what did I do wrong
        // and chais of if( o != null && o.isEmpty() || moonPhaseIs... ) 
   }

Bear in mind, that, if a program is to fail, the best thing you can do is to making it fail fast.

Collections.max have a different purpose, because being an utility method (not an immutable object ), he cannot held responsibility for the empty collection creation ( he wasn't present when that happened ), the only thing he can do is to say "There is no such a thing as max in this collection" hence NoSuchElementException.

One last remark, RuntimeExceptions, should be used for programming mistakes only ( those that can be fixed by testing the application before releasing it )

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You should thrown an UnsupportedOpertationException because that's what the Java Standard Library does in the same circumstance. Your example is a type qualifier object protocol. This pattern was defined in "An Empirical Study of Object Protocols in the Wild":

Some types disable certain methods for the lifetime of the object. In the type qualifier category, an object instance will enter an abstract state S at construction-time which it will never leave. Calls to an instance method m, if it is disabled in state S will always fail.

In your example, your object enters an abstract state which I'll call EmptyCollection at construction time and it never leaves that state because the collection field is final. In the EmptyCollection abstract state all calls to the getMax() instance method will always fail.

Beckman studied open source Java programs looking for object protocols and categorized the resulting classes. The third most common protocol category, appearing in 16.4% of the protocols sampled, was type qualifier.

Beckman's paper lists many type qualifier examples and I selected three of them and in each case the unavailable method throws an UnsupportedOperationException:

  1. When you create an unmodifiable list by calling Colections.unmodifiableList(...) and then call the add method on the resulting list.
  2. When you create a java.nio.ByteBuffer that is not backed by an array and then call the array method.
  3. When you create a java.imageio.ImageWriteParam that does not support compression and then call the setCompressionMode method.

Notice that these examples do not follow Kevin Bourillon's advice that you cite. The failure of these methods is dependent on how the instances were constructed. In examples 1 and 2 the instances that succeed and fail may be of different concrete classes since List and ByteBuffer are abstract. However, ImageWriteParam is a concrete class so one instance of ImageWriteParam may throw the UnsupportedOperationException while another one may not. Since the Java Standard Library designers also defined the exception types I would follow their lead instead of Mr. Bourillon's.

P.S. You should use IllegalStateException when instead the abstract state of your object can change at runtime. The other 83.6% of the examples in Beckman's paper are of this type.

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