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I am trying to create a flashing arrow. However when I execute this script in different browsers it behaves badly. IE says its out of memory, Chrome lags for a second and then behaves well and in firefox the animation is sticky.

Hope someone can work out a way that I can animate a flashing arrow smoothly. Thanks

aniPointer($('#arrow'));

function aniPointer(point) {
        point.animate({opacity: 1.0}, {duration: 300})
            .animate({opacity: 0.2}, {duration: 700})
            .animate({opacity: 0.2}, {duration: 300})
            .animate({opacity: 1.0}, {duration: 300, complete: aniPointer(point)})
    }
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're creating an infinite loop. You did so intentionally, but its running a lot faster than you think. complete takes a function reference. By adding the parens to the name of the callback function you are invoking aniPointer immediately and passing the return value to complete instead of passing a reference to aniPointer itself to be fired at some later time.

Even so, is that sequence really what you want to do?

You're doing:

go to 1.0 over 300ms
go to 0.2 over 700ms
go to 0.2 over 300ms
go to 1.0 over 300ms
repeat

Assuming you're starting at 1.0 this is actually:

wait 300ms
go to 0.2 over 700ms
wait 300ms
go to 1.0 over 300ms
repeat

If you're looking for a steady pulse you could do something like this:

function pulse($elem) {
    return window.setInterval(function() {
        $elem.animate({opacity: 0.2}, 700)
             .animate({opacity: 1.0}, 300);
    }, 1000);
}

Or if you were pausing intentionally you could do:

function pulse($elem) {
    return window.setInterval(function() {
        $elem.animate({opacity: 0.2}, 700);
        window.setTimeout( function() {
            $elem.animate({opacity: 1.0}, 300);
        }, 1000);
    }, 1600);
}

The return value would allow you to stop the animation if you wanted to like so:

var pulseIntervalId = pulse( $('#arrow_id') );

//some time later...
window.clearInterval(pulseIntervalId);

Either version would skirt the infinite loop issue, allowing the callback to have the reference to the pulsing element without being invoked prematurely.

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wow, I really couldn't ask for a more detailed answer! –  Jigs Jul 16 '10 at 20:45
    
Hah, I hope it works! GL. –  jasongetsdown Jul 16 '10 at 20:47
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jasongetsdown's answer, although technically correct, is not very jQuery-esque. It also has the problem that if the animate takes slightly longer than it ought to, the window.setTimeout won't care and run a second instance in parallel, which might lead to all sorts of problems, so it's better to wait for the completion of the animate call before triggering a new one.

Here's another solution :

$.fn.pulse = function(lowOpacity, highOpacity) {
    if (isNaN(+lowOpacity)) lowOpacity = 0.2;
    if (isNaN(+highOpacity)) highOpacity = 1;
    var that = this;
    (this)
        .delay(300)
        .animate({opacity: lowOpacity}, 700)
        .delay(300)
        .animate({opacity: highOpacity}, 300, function() { that.pulse(lowOpacity, highOpacity); });
}

To use it you would do :

$('#elem').pulse();

To stop it you would do :

$('#elem').stop().clearQueue();
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