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I am trying to calculate sharpe ratio in java, but I am struggling to find a "correct" dataset and result to test

Refering to http://www.hedgeco.net/blogs/2008/07/30/explaining-the-sharpe-ratio-again/

Investment Monthly Returns

Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May    June  Jul    Aug  Sep    Oct    Nov  Dec
1.64  5.85  9.22  3.51  -0.88  1.07  13.03  9.4  10.49  -5.08  n/a  n/a

Risk Free Rate 5%

However, I could not get what he got (2.56, instead I got 2.67 rounding error?)

Is this the right way (or commonly accepted way) to compute sharpe ratio?

My code (statistics computed using apache-commons-math)

    DescriptiveStatistics stats = new DescriptiveStatistics();
    for( double item : returns) {
        stats.addValue(item);
    }

    double mean = stats.getMean();

    double std = stats.getStandardDeviation();

    double sharpeRatio = (mean - (riskFreeReturn/12) ) / std * Math.sqrt(12);

    System.out.println("sharpeRatio="+ sharpeRatio);
share|improve this question
    
First of all, Sharpe Ratio is yet another scam in the field of "econometrics". Secondly, are you sure that you are computing standard deviation correctly? –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 17 '10 at 3:11
    
I am using apache.commons.math library to calculate std deviation. So I assume it's correct? –  portoalet Jul 17 '10 at 3:21
1  
@Hamish - Sharpe Ratio is investments terminology, not econometrics. –  mob Jul 17 '10 at 3:22
    
I get 2.6568 -- you're both wrong. –  Gabe Jul 17 '10 at 4:23
    
Your calculation appears to assume you have 12 months worth of data when you only have 10. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 17 '10 at 7:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the calculations the article links to, you have the right answer and the article displays the wrong results.

share|improve this answer
    
rule the DescriptiveStatistics class is using an unbiased estimtor (based on the comments on the Variance.java in commons-math package) –  portoalet Jul 17 '10 at 7:42
    
@portoalet - that's what I discovered, too, so I changed my answer. –  mob Jul 17 '10 at 21:22

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