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how to find a random element in a sorted array of unknown length.

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closed as not a real question by Jerry Coffin, Marc Gravell Jul 18 '10 at 8:51

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Find a random element sounds like picking a random element. But I assume you want to find a specific element in the array, right? –  Felix Kling Jul 17 '10 at 12:47
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How can you not know the length of the array? How will you know that your index is out-of-boundaries? –  pascal Jul 17 '10 at 12:51
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And what do you mean by 'unknown length'? Do you mean the length is indeterminate (meaning that you can't tell how long it is even at runtime, which seems unlikely) or that the length varies from one pass to the next? In the second case, do you have an approximate min/max length? –  Toby Jul 17 '10 at 12:53
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-1, the question is so unclear, and the author does not make any attempts to clarify - it should be closed –  Doc Brown Jul 17 '10 at 13:12
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Voting to close -- at present the question is so unclear it's meaningless. The author has had an hour to clarify what he wants, but doesn't appear to have made any attempt to do so... –  Jerry Coffin Jul 17 '10 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

I'll assume you mean how do I find if an element is part of the array? not how do I return a random element from the array?.

Use binary search and assume that the length is very big (surely you have an upper bound?). If the middle element m you select at each step is outside the array bounds (you need a way to tell this), then limit the search to those elements with indexes small than m.

If you don't have a way to tell if an element is outside the bounds of the array then I don't see how you could solve this.

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@Marc Gravell - I think that much is obvious from the question. –  IVlad Jul 18 '10 at 9:16
    
You are right; I missed that (removed, but for history: I commented about it needing to be sorted) –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '10 at 9:46

I suppose that you have something that you can loop, but you can't determine the length beforehand. You can get a random item by looping the items, and calculate the probability that the item should be picked.

C# example to pick an int (selected) from an IEnumerable<int> (items):

Random rnd = new Random();
int cnt = 0;
int selected = 0;
foreach (int item in items) {
  if (rnd.Next(++cnt) == 0) {
    selected = item;
  }
}

At the first item, you get a random number between 0 and 0, which of course is 0, so you keep that item. At the second item, you get a random number between 0 and 1, and if it is 0, you keep the second item instead. And so on until you run out of items. For each additional item, the probability to keep that one instead gets lower, which is why the probability to end up with any specific item in the collection is the same.

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This isn't an array though, and you don't use the fact that the elements are sorted. –  IVlad Jul 17 '10 at 13:21
    
@IVlad: The size of an array in .NET is always known, so that part doesn't really make sense. This solutions works for any collection that you can iterate. If you want to get a random item, it's completely irrelevant if the items are sorted or not. –  Guffa Jul 17 '10 at 15:17
    
+1: this is a good solution for choosing a random item from a stream of items. It can be easily proved (by induction) that at step N every item has a chance of 1/N to be chosen. (I don't know yet what is the relevance of the fact that the stream is sorted...) –  Eyal Schneider Jul 17 '10 at 20:58

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