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The fields in my form have a label, some help text, some example text, and some contextual text.

<!--With Help and Example-->
<li>
    <label for="ingredients">Ingredients</label>
    <br/><!--Is this good practice?-->
    <span class="help">Enter one ingredient per line.</span>
    <br/>
    <textarea id="ingredients" name="ingredients"></textarea>
    <br/>
    <span class="example"><b>Example:</b><br/>1 Cup of Flour<br/>Pinch of Salt<br/>1 Tbsp of Paprika</span>

<!--With context-->
<li>
   <label for="yield">Yield</label>
   <br /> <!--Wish labels were block and you had to style them to be inline-->
   <input type="number" id="yield" name="yield" />
   <span class="context"> servings.</span>
</li>

When I look at it un-styled it drives me nuts how all of these things run together on the same line.

I might have come up with a solution to my question while typing. I think I might use <p> for my help and example text. I still don't like that labels are always on the same line as the input.

share|improve this question
    
Your use of <b> is absolutely bad HTML. –  You Jul 17 '10 at 14:18
    
Why's that? I don't want any emphasis placed on the text it contains. I just want it typographically/visually bold. In other words. If I left it out and didn't make the text bold it would still make total sense. w3schools.com/html5/tag_b.asp –  Jonnie Jul 17 '10 at 14:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If one is being really pedantic, almost all uses of <br/> are 'bad HTML'. <br/> means a semantic line break. In other words, where removing the <br/> would change the meaning of the content. These really only occur in poetry/lyrics and postal addresses.

You could achieve the same outcome by making the other elements inside the <li>s have display:block styling.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was over-thinking it. I was planning on styling them as block. While I was writing the HTML, I kept looking at it all running together on one line, in my browser. I couldn't help but want to break the lines. –  Jonnie Jul 17 '10 at 14:39

It's not bad per se, but you ought to use CSS for styling (e.g. layout). It makes the code easier to read. E.g.

CSS

<style type="text/css">
  #myrecipies label,
  #myrecipies li:first-child span:first-child,
  #myrecipies textarea {
    display: block;
  }
</style>

HTML

<ul id="myrecipies">
  <li>
    <label for="ingredients">Ingredients</label>
    <span class="help">Enter one ingredient per line.</span>
    <textarea id="ingredients" name="ingredients"></textarea>
    <span class="example"><b>Example:</b><br/>1 Cup of Flour<br/>Pinch of Salt<br/>1 Tbsp of Paprika</span>
  </li>
  <li>
   <label for="yield">Yield</label>
   <input type="number" id="yield" name="yield" />
   <span class="context"> servings.</span>
  </li>
</ul>

This code in action.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gert. Never heard of JsFiddle. Bookmarked! –  Jonnie Jul 17 '10 at 14:41

If you mean "bad" as in invalid, according to the W3 validator, no. <br>s are allowed between <label> and <input> elements.

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Actually, <br> elements are allowed inside <li> elements. Its siblings are completely irrelevant. –  You Jul 17 '10 at 14:16
    
I know that it's valid. I guess what I'm wondering is whether or not it's good practice. I may be over-thinking the issue. –  Jonnie Jul 17 '10 at 14:23

I don't think a lable needs to be in the same line as the input field. The only thing that is important for a good user experience, is that it is next to it, which could also mean above.

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"Bad" as in invalid? No. "Bad" as in unsemantic? Yes.

A better way of doing this would be to wrap your label elements in p elements. They are paragraphs, after all. (Besides, labels are not something that should be block elements, it is an inline element because it gives purpose to inline text, the same way em or the HTML5 time element does — a block element does more than that. Style it as a block element using CSS)

Edit: See also the answer by Alohci, explaining why <br> is being used incorrectly here.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrapping a label in a paragraph? That's no better than using a line break. Most form labels aren't paragraphs of text, so they don't belong in a <p> tag. –  derekerdmann Jul 17 '10 at 14:16
    
A "paragraph" doesn't have to be more than a few words long, it merely describes a block of text. –  You Jul 17 '10 at 14:20
    
No, in writing, a paragraph typically contains one or more sentences (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paragraph) and deals with a single point or idea. Since the W3C spec says that the <p> tag indicates a paragraph of text (w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/struct/text.html#h-9.3.1), a form label is an inappropriate use of the <p> element. –  derekerdmann Jul 18 '10 at 14:02

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