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What is a fast way to compute the (long int) ceiling(log_2(i)), where the input and output are 64-bit integers? Solutions for signed or unsigned integers are acceptable. I suspect the best way will be a bit-twiddling method similar to those found here, but rather than attempt my own I would like to use something that is already well tested. A general solution will work for all positive values.

For instance, the values for 2,3,4,5,6,7,8 are 1,2,2,3,3,3,3

Edit: So far the best route seems to be to compute the integer/floor log base 2 (the position of the MSB) using any number of fast existing bithacks or register methods, and then to add one if the input is not a power of two. The fast bitwise check for powers of two is (n&(n-1)).

Another method might be to try a binary search on exponents e until 1<<e is greater than or equal to the input.

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What's your accuracy range? –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 17 '10 at 17:07
    
Must be exactly correct for at least all values strictly greater than one and less than a large number, say 2^63 or 2^62. –  kevinlawler Jul 17 '10 at 17:21
    
Please see my answer below. I put an explanation + the code that will do this for you. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 17 '10 at 17:31
1  
In the past, I've generally used a combination of lookup tables and bit-twiddling, similar to the ones in the link to the bit-twiddling page. –  TechNeilogy Jul 17 '10 at 17:51
    
If you're dealing with positive values only, a simple way to handle the rounding is to find the most significant bit set for ((x << 1) - 1). You'd need to special-case x == 0, and you'll overflow if the top bit is set, but this method might be faster than some of the other rounding techniques presented. –  tomlogic Aug 2 '10 at 20:33
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12 Answers 12

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This algorithm has already been posted, but the following implementation is very compact and should optimize into branch-free code.

int ceil_log2(unsigned long long x)
{
  static const unsigned long long t[6] = {
    0xFFFFFFFF00000000ull,
    0x00000000FFFF0000ull,
    0x000000000000FF00ull,
    0x00000000000000F0ull,
    0x000000000000000Cull,
    0x0000000000000002ull
  };

  int y = (((x & (x - 1)) == 0) ? 0 : 1);
  int j = 32;
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    int k = (((x & t[i]) == 0) ? 0 : j);
    y += k;
    x >>= k;
    j >>= 1;
  }

  return y;
}


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  printf("%d\n", ceil_log2(atol(argv[1])));

  return 0;
}
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I've remarked this as the best answer. For anyone following the discussion, the reason this is currently the best answer is the assembly language solutions are platform specific. –  kevinlawler Mar 11 '13 at 20:25
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If you can limit yourself to gcc, there are a set of builtin functions which return the number of leading zero bits and can be used to do what you want with a little work:

int __builtin_clz (unsigned int x)
int __builtin_clzl (unsigned long)
int __builtin_clzll (unsigned long long)
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If you're compiling for 64-bit processors on Windows, I think this should work. _BitScanReverse64 is an intrinsic function.

#include <intrin.h>
__int64 log2ceil( __int64 x )
{
  unsigned long index;
  if ( !_BitScanReverse64( &index, x ) )
     return -1LL; //dummy return value for x==0

  // add 1 if x is NOT a power of 2 (to do the ceil)
  return index + (n&(n-1)?1:0);
}

For 32-bit, you can emulate _BitScanReverse64, with 1 or 2 calls to _BitScanReverse. Check the upper 32-bits of x, ((long*)&x)[1], then the lower 32-bits if needed, ((long*)&x)[0].

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I was thinking something more general than Windows-specific, but so far yours is the closest to the answer. Translated, the idea is that there is a fast bitwise method for checking whether something is a power of two (shown above). We can use this method in conjunction with a register method for determining the position of the MSB to retrieve the answer. –  kevinlawler Jul 18 '10 at 0:46
1  
+1 and @highperformance: if you only intend to run your code on x86 processors, you can do the bit-scanning yourself with a little bit of assembly. (the BSR instruction, to be specific) –  casablanca Jul 18 '10 at 1:40
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#include "stdafx.h"
#include "assert.h"

int getpos(unsigned __int64 value)
{
    if (!value)
    {
      return -1; // no bits set
    }
    int pos = 0;
    if (value & (value - 1ULL))
    {
      pos = 1;
    }
    if (value & 0xFFFFFFFF00000000ULL)
    {
      pos += 32;
      value = value >> 32;
    }
    if (value & 0x00000000FFFF0000ULL)
    {
      pos += 16;
      value = value >> 16;
    }
    if (value & 0x000000000000FF00ULL)
    {
      pos += 8;
      value = value >> 8;
    }
    if (value & 0x00000000000000F0ULL)
    {
      pos += 4;
      value = value >> 4;
    }
    if (value & 0x000000000000000CULL)
    {
      pos += 2;
      value = value >> 2;
    }
    if (value & 0x0000000000000002ULL)
    {
      pos += 1;
      value = value >> 1;
    }
    return pos;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{    
    assert(getpos(0ULL) == -1); // None bits set, return -1.
    assert(getpos(1ULL) == 0);
    assert(getpos(2ULL) == 1);
    assert(getpos(3ULL) == 2);
    assert(getpos(4ULL) == 2);
    for (int k = 0; k < 64; ++k)
    {
        int pos = getpos(1ULL << k);
        assert(pos == k);
    }
    for (int k = 0; k < 64; ++k)
    {
        int pos = getpos( (1ULL << k) - 1);
        assert(pos == (k < 2 ? k - 1 : k) );
    }
    for (int k = 0; k < 64; ++k)
    {
        int pos = getpos( (1ULL << k) | 1);
        assert(pos == (k < 1 ? k : k + 1) );
    }
    for (int k = 0; k < 64; ++k)
    {
        int pos = getpos( (1ULL << k) + 1);
        assert(pos == k + 1);
    }
    return 0;
}
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Fast and correct –  kevinlawler Aug 3 '10 at 1:29
    
Lookup table would eliminate the last several if clauses, four or more of them depending on the available memory. –  kevinlawler Aug 3 '10 at 15:25
1  
To use a 16-bit lookup table: declare global short getpos_lookup[1 << 16];. Pre-populate: int i; for(i=1;i<1<<16;i++) getpos_lookup[i]=log2(i); Then under the 16 case comment out the 8/4/2/1 cases and put pos += getpos_lookup[v];. –  kevinlawler Aug 3 '10 at 17:14
    
Actually i'm not even sure if my version is fast at all. Using a for-loop might be faster than any of the other approaches. –  rwong Aug 4 '10 at 3:54
    
I ran some simple tests. Your method is appreciably faster than a loop (e.g. while(value>>=1)pos++;). Modifying your method to use a lookup table is slightly faster, but I wouldn't call it appreciably faster. For my purposes your method is already fast enough. However, if someone were looking to continue improving on it, I would look into: 1. replacing the MSB detection with a register call (potentially using #ifdef statements for portability). 2. employing some heuristics to exploit known distributions of the input (e.g. 90% of incoming numbers are under 1000) 3. use of lookup tables –  kevinlawler Aug 6 '10 at 19:03
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Using the gcc builtins mentioned by @egosys you can build some useful macros. For a quick and rough floor(log2(x)) calculation you can use:

#define FAST_LOG2(x) (sizeof(unsigned long)*8 - 1 - __builtin_clzl((unsigned long)(x)))

For a similar ceil(log2(x)), use:

#define FAST_LOG2_UP(x) (((x) - (1 << FAST_LOG2(x))) ? FAST_LOG2(x) + 1 : FAST_LOG2(x))

The latter can be further optimized using more gcc peculiarities to avoid the double call to the builtin, but I'm not sure you need it here.

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Thanks. My concern with this is the call to the built-in. It does compile on gcc and clang, which would cover most instances. If I knew it compiled on icc I might go with it. Cross-platform compatibility is a concern. I also wouldn't mind seeing the double call cleaned up as you suggest. (Can you not use (x&(x-1))?) –  kevinlawler May 13 '12 at 1:25
1  
You can use #define FAST_LOG2_UP(x) ({ unsigned long log = FAST_LOG2(x); ((x) - (1 << log)) ? log + 1 : log; }) to avoid multiple calls to the builtin. Please note this is again gcc-specific. –  Alexander Amelkin May 16 '12 at 16:23
1  
another improvement can be eliminating the branching: log + !!(x ^ (1 << log)) –  alveko May 30 '13 at 14:27
    
In my tests, two variations of the AND-MINUS method ((x&(x-1))?1:0) and (!!(x&(x-1))) ran within 1% of each other: probably the same. The XOR-SHIFT method MSB+!!(x^(1<<MSB)) was significantly slower, by about 50%. –  kevinlawler Jul 13 at 14:56
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Finding the log base 2 of an integer (64-bit or any other bit) with integer output is equivalent to finding the most significant bit that is set. Why? Because log base 2 is how many times you can divide the number by 2 to reach 1.

One way to find the MSB that's set is to simply bitshift to the right by 1 each time until you have 0. Another more efficient way is to do some kind of binary search via bitmasks.

The ceil part is easily worked out by checking if any other bits are set other than the MSB.

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Don't you mean bitshift to the right by 1 each time until you have 1? And since he wants the ceiling, it's that number + 1. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 17 '10 at 17:43
    
@Computer Guru: No, it is not "that number + 1". It is "that number + 1 if the result isn't exact". –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 17 '10 at 18:18
    
Right, and the odds are that it won't be exact. So "that number + 1" is more accurate more often than "that number" :) –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 17 '10 at 20:06
    
Ok, what about this: Calculate the number of "1" bits, and sum 1 if the number of "1" bits is greater than 1. –  luiscubal Jul 17 '10 at 21:57
    
I know generally how to go about it. The difficulty is figuring out which particular set of bit-wise operations is best. I was hoping there was an existing solution similar to those on the Stanford bithacks page. –  kevinlawler Jul 18 '10 at 0:36
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If you have 80-bit or 128-bit floats available, cast to that type and then read off the exponent bits. This link has details (for integers up to 52 bits) and several other methods:

http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogIEEE64Float

Also, check the ffmpeg source. I know they have a very fast algorithm. Even if it's not directly extensible to larger sizes, you can easily do something like if (x>INT32_MAX) return fastlog2(x>>32)+32; else return fastlog2(x);

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Checking the source of popular projects is a good idea. –  kevinlawler Jul 18 '10 at 0:39
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The true fastest solution:

A binary search tree of 63 entries. These are the powers of 2 from 0 to 63. One-time generation function to create the tree. The leafs represent the log base 2 of the powers (basically, the numbers 1-63).

To find the answer, you feed a number into the tree, and navigate to the leaf node greater than the item. If the leaf node is exactly equal, result is the leaf value. Otherwise, result is the leaf value + 1.

Complexity is fixed at O(6).

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+1 really nice idea –  Dave O. Jul 17 '10 at 20:50
    
of course you don't really need a tree, just adapt the bisection method for root finding to halve the interval each iteration. –  GregS Jul 17 '10 at 21:19
    
Dave: Thanks. Greg: Of course. Tree is easier to visualize for the uninitiated, though. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 17 '10 at 21:46
5  
In practice, I think this kind of branching will be slowish on the CPU (a benchmark would be interesting!). Faster is possible because we can use instructions which operate on 64-bits in parallel. Anyways, your approach is like an unrolled version of "Find the log base 2 of an N-bit integer in O(lg(N)) operations" in the link. And... O(6)=O(1)=O(99999) –  Tom Sirgedas Jul 17 '10 at 22:17
2  
The binary search does not require any branching. It can be done entirely with arithmetic on sign bits/carry flags. –  R.. Jul 18 '10 at 7:29
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The following code snippet is a safe and portable way to extend plain-C methods, such as @dgobbi's, to use compiler intrinsics when compiled using supporting compilers (Clang). Placing this at the top of the method will cause the method to use the builtin when it is available. When the builtin is unavailable the method will fall back to the standard C code.

#if __has_builtin(__builtin_clzll) //use compiler if possible
  return ((sizeof(unsigned long long) * 8 - 1) - __builtin_clzll(x)) + (!!(x & (x - 1)));
#endif
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You might be able to gain some inspiration from the venerable HAKMEM.

http://www.inwap.com/pdp10/hbaker/hakmem/hacks.html#item160

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The code below is simpler and will work as long as the input x >= 1. input clog2(0) will get an undefined answer (which makes sense because log(0) is infinity...) You can add error checking for (x == 0) if you want:

unsigned int clog2 (unsigned int x)
{
    unsigned int result = 0;
    --x;
    while (x > 0) {
        ++result;
        x >>= 1;
    }

    return result;
}

By the way, the code for the floor of log2 is similar: (Again, assuming x >= 1)

unsigned int flog2 (unsigned int x)
{
    unsigned int result = 0;
    while (x > 1) {
        ++result;
        x >>= 1;
    }

    return result;
}
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My apologies for posting this Java code, but I think it translates almost exactly to C. Java doesn't have unsigned types so I just considered positive longs. This is inspired by Computer Guru's answer and the binary search comment in Brian Bondy's answer

public static int log2(long x)
{
    int log2low = 0;
    int log2high = 62;

    if (x <= 0)
    {
        return -1;
    }

    while ((log2high-log2low) > 1)
    {
        /*
         * invariant: 2**log2low <= x <= 2**log2high
         */
        final int log2mid = (log2low + log2high) / 2;
        final long mid = 1L << log2mid;
        if (x > mid)
        {
            log2low = log2mid;
        }
        else if (x < mid)
        {
            log2high = log2mid;
        }
        else // x is a power of 2
        {
            return log2mid;
        }
    }
    return (x == (1<<log2low)) ? log2low : log2high;
}

Note: this can be accelerated by precomputing a table of size 2**k that maps the k high order bits of the argument z to the ceil(log2(z)). In other words, instead of the loop condition (log2high-log2low) > 1 it becomes (log2high-log2low) > k.

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