Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Well on Facebook they seem to have a block which prevents you from loading an iframe of their website.

When you do, they lock complete functionality of their website example.

I'm just wondering if anyone knows how you could bypass this?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If they did not prevent this, an attacker could load Facebook pages into an transparent iframe and put something interesting below it. Lets asume a victim has logged in to facebook and then visits the website of the attacker (after some time, in another tab).

The victim will click on something on the attacker's website. But in fact it is clicking onto the transparent iframe and triggering some action on the facebook website. The browser will of course sent the session cookie to Facebook and Facebook sees a legitimate action by an logged in user.

Wikipedia has an article on Clickjacking: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clickjacking

This attack can be prevented using the unofficial X-Frame-Option http header as described on http://www.webmasterworld.com/webmaster/4022867.htm Unfortunately not all browsers support it, so a frame breaking java script is required, too.

share|improve this answer

If you can do that, facebook faces a serious security threat.

I say forget it, even if a method is found, facebook would soon block it, and the method will fail then.

Unless, you are doing something naughty and you only need something that works now.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd be interested to know what security threat Facebook would face by allowing this. Could you elaborate? – lucideer Jul 17 '10 at 23:53
1  
clickjacking for example. – irreputable Jul 18 '10 at 0:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.