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I have a recursive object, a linked list really:

public class LinkedList 
{
    public string UniqueKey { get; set; }
    public LinkedList LinkedList { get; set; }
}

LinkedList will have some object graph that will eventually end in LinkedList.LinkedList == null.

I would like to take all the objects in the graph and put them into a LinkedList collection so that I can iterate over them. How do I do this in C#? I feel as if there's a really easy way of going about this using yield or Linq voodoo?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this should work. If you have control over the class you can make it IEnumerable directly.

public class LinkedListEnumerable : IEnumerable<string>
{
    LinkedList list;
    public LinkedListEnumerable(LinkedList l)
    {
        this.list = l;
    }

    public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
    {
        LinkedList l = list;
        while(l != null)
        {
            yield return l.UniqueKey;
            l = l.Next;
        }
    }
}

Then you can iterate over LinkedListEnumerable with a for-each loop.

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Yeah, this is right. Except if you take the question verbatim then it should be yield return l instead of yield return l.UniqueKey right? All the same it should be easy enough for the OP to figure that part out. –  Brian Gideon Jul 18 '10 at 3:06

There are no nice LINQ methods in the standard .NET library to allow some elegant LINQ voodoo, but you can use Generate method from MoreLINQ project and write this:

Enumerable
  .Generate(list, l => l.LinkedList)
  .TakeWhile(l => l != null).Select(l => l.UniqueKey);

It uses Generate to create "infinite" list of all elements - it is not actually infinite, because it is generated lazily and we stop using it as soon as we find null value at the end (using TakeWhile). Then we use Select to return a sequence of values (instead of linked list nodes).

This is essentially a nice declarative way of expressing the while loop solution posted by Matthew (and it should have roughly similar performance).

EDIT The Generate method looks like this:

IEnumerable<T> Generate(T current, Func<T, T> generator) {
  while(true) { 
    yield return current;
    current = generator(current);
  }
}
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This is awesome, but unfortunately I cannot add any other libraries to the project. I'll be using this on future products though! –  chum of chance Jul 18 '10 at 3:02
    
@Geoffrey: You can add the Generate method to your project (it is just 3 lines of code). –  Tomas Petricek Jul 18 '10 at 3:12

Is this what you want?

public class LinkedList
{
    public string UniqueKey { get; set; }
    public LinkedList LinkedList { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<LinkedList> GetAllNodes()
    {
        if (LinkedList != null)
        {
            yield return LinkedList;
            foreach (var node in LinkedList.GetAllNodes())
                yield return node;
        }
    }
}
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2  
That's not very efficient. For a list with 100 items you will be creating 100 enumerators, and the last item has to pass through all of them before it's returned to the caller. –  Guffa Jul 18 '10 at 2:04

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