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How would I check if the input is really a double?

double x;

while (1) {
    cout << '>';
    if (cin >> x) {
        // valid number
        break;
    } else {
        // not a valid number
        cout << "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value." << endl;
    }
}
//do other stuff...

The above code infinitely outputs the Invalid Input! statement, so its not prompting for another input. I want to prompt for the input, check if it is legitimate... if its a double, go on... if it is NOT a double, prompt again.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Be sure to look at the formatting guide next time you make a post. Thanks. –  strager Jul 18 '10 at 1:39
    
what do you mean? what is wrong with the formatting? –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:39
    
I edited your post, but before the edit the code wasn't formatted. Click "edited N mins ago" to see the original post. –  strager Jul 18 '10 at 1:43
    
I see... I thought I had done that... must have missed the formatting button and pressed something else by accident. My apologies. –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try this:

while (1) {
  if (cin >> x) {
      // valid number
      break;
  } else {
      // not a valid number
      cout << "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value." << endl;
      cin.clear();
      while (cin.get() != '\n') ; // empty loop
  }
}

This basically clears the error state, then reads and discards everything that was entered on the previous line.

share|improve this answer
    
is this inside the while(1) loop? –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:56
3  
Instead of while(cin.get() != '\n');, I'd just use cin.sync();. It's more readable in my opinion. –  chaosTechnician Jul 18 '10 at 2:08
1  
In UNIX, it's a \r\n, so there's still a \n at the end. So yes, it will work. –  casablanca Jul 18 '10 at 2:10
1  
@chaosTechnician, cin.sync() doesn't work for me when I try this example. the while(cin.get() != '\n'); does though. Any idea why? –  Mahmoud Abdelkader Jul 18 '10 at 6:48
1  
No, it's written before: cin.sync(); Here's a snippet of the code: int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { double x; while (1) { cout << '>'; if (cin >> x) { break; } else { // not a valid number cout << "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value." << endl; cin.clear(); cin.sync(); // while(cin.get() != '\n'); } } cout << "you entered: " << x << endl; return 0; } –  Mahmoud Abdelkader Jul 20 '10 at 18:31
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

bool askForDouble(char const *question, double &ret)
{
        using namespace std;
        while(true)
        {
                cout << question << flush;
                cin >> ret;
                if(cin.good())
                {
                        return true;
                }
                if(cin.eof())
                {
                        return false;
                }
                // (cin.fail() || cin.bad()) is true here
                cin.clear();  // clear state flags
                string dummy;
                cin >> dummy; // discard a word
        }
}

int main()
{
        double x;
        if(askForDouble("Give me a floating point number! ",x))
        {
                std::cout << "The double of it is: " << (x*2) << std::endl;
        } else
        {
                std::cerr << "END OF INPUT" << std::endl;
        }
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Input validation should have been an easier task to do. It makes it very hard to teach newbies and help them enjoy what they are doing. I would like to see a bulletproof and still useful tutorial on cin and cout for newbies. –  Notinlist May 5 '12 at 18:25

failbit will be set after using an extraction operator if there was a parse error, there are a couple simple test functions good and fail you can check. They are exactly the opposite of each other because they handle eofbit differently, but that's not an issue in this example.

Then, you have to clear failbit before trying again.

As casablanca says, you also have to discard the non-numeric data still left in the input buffer.

So:

double x;

while (1) {
    cout << '>';
    cin >> x;
    if (cin.good())
        // valid number
        break;
    } else {
        // not a valid number
        cout << "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value." << endl;
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(100000, '\n');
    }
}
//do other stuff...
share|improve this answer
    
this is still causing the infinite loop to print the Invalid Input!... its not prompting for another input. –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:50
    
What does the cin.ignore() do? –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 2:07
    
Same thing as casablanca's loop, it throws away all characters up to and including the newline to get rid of whatever non-numeric data caused the first extraction to fail. –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '10 at 2:18

One way is to check for floating number equality.

double x;

while (1) {
    cout << '>';
    cin >> x;
    if (x != int(x)) {
        // valid number
        break;
    } else {
        // not a valid number
        cout << "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value." << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
how does this check for type double? –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:58
    
This just checks if the input had a fractional part, which is probably not what was meant by the question. –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '10 at 2:00
    
Yeah, most of us know what Hristo meant but this answer does address the question he asked: "How would I check if the input is really a double?" Interpreting that as, "I assume I'm getting numbers, how do I ensure they aren't whole numbers?" makes this a perfectly useful answer. No need to downvote, imo. –  chaosTechnician Jul 18 '10 at 19:21
    
@chaosTechnician The error message says "Invalid Input! Please input a numerical value.". Whole and not-whole numbers are both "numerical values". So this answer's intention is very unclear for me. Not down-voting anyway. :-) –  Notinlist May 5 '12 at 18:21

I would use scanf instead of cin.

The scanf function will return the number of matches from the target string. To make sure a valid double was parsed, make sure the return value of scanf is 1.

Edit:
Changed fscanf to scanf.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to read from the command line... isn't fscanf for reading from a FILE? –  Hristo Jul 18 '10 at 1:48
    
The question is about how to do it using cin. –  casablanca Jul 18 '10 at 1:49
    
scanf will provide the same functionality except will be read from stdin instead of an arbitrary file object. –  advait Jul 18 '10 at 1:53
    
You don't "read" from the command line, it comes in as the argv parameter to main(). Both scanf and cin read from standard input, and cin is definitely preferred in C++ programs as it is type safe. fscanf can read from any file (including stdin), the C++ equivalent is ofstream fin(filename); fin >> x;. cin is a pre-created stream that acts on standard input. –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '10 at 1:55
    
@Hristo - scanf reads from the standard input stream which is exactly what cin reads from. Neither read from the "command line". –  D.Shawley Jul 18 '10 at 1:55

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