Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a nutshell here is what I want to happen:

Complete the join, if the rows do not exist do the same join but using one different value to fill the null columns in each row.

Here is my join:

Left Join CMS_ECH.dbo.hsplit hsplit on hsplit.row_date = ANDREWSTABLE.SegStart_Date 
and hsplit.split=ANDREWSTABLE.dispsplit 
and hsplit.starttime = ANDREWSTABLE.Interval 
and hsplit.acd = ANDREWSTABLE.acd1

Where ACD1 is either 1 or 4.

For some rows there will be nulls.

If the result of the join returns a null row_date then... and here is where my knowledge fails me... so for the sake of no other words to describe it... rejoin the null rows in the table using a different value for acd1. If acd1 = 1 then use 4. If acd1 is 4 then use 1.

I am using MS SQL 2005

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Most (if not all) SQL dialects have an ISNULL() or COALESCE() function, which allows you to specify an alternative value when underlying column is NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
Using MS SQL 2005, thanks! –  CodingIsAwesome Jul 18 '10 at 2:45

This'll do it, it won't perform brilliantly as the CASE statement will interfere with index choice, however give it a go and hope for the best.

SELECT COALESCE(hsplit.requiredfield, hsplit2.requiredfield) AS requiredfield,
...
Left Join CMS_ECH.dbo.hsplit hsplit on hsplit.row_date = ANDREWSTABLE.SegStart_Date 
and hsplit.split=ANDREWSTABLE.dispsplit 
and hsplit.starttime = ANDREWSTABLE.Interval 
and hsplit.acd = ANDREWSTABLE.acd1
Left Join CMS_ECH.dbo.hsplit hsplit2 on hsplit2.row_date = ANDREWSTABLE.SegStart_Date 
and hsplit2.split=ANDREWSTABLE.dispsplit 
and hsplit2.starttime = ANDREWSTABLE.Interval 
and CASE WHEN hsplit2.acd = 1 THEN 4 WHEN hsplit2.acd = 4 THEN 1 WHEN ... END = ANDREWSTABLE.acd1                  
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.