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In liberal C:

/* i'm using this */

struct QueueItem
    {
    QueueItem* next;
    void* data;
    }

struct Queue
    {
    QueueItem* head;
    QueueItem* tail;
    }

/*
    +---+    +---+
    |0 0|    |* *|  len 1
    +---+    +|-|+
              v v
     len     +---+
      0      |d 0|
             +---+

    +---+
    |* *---------...---+
    +|--+              |  len n
     v                 v
    +---+  +---+      +---+
    |a *-->|b *--...->|z 0|
    +---+  +---+      +---+
*/

This gives O(1) for all push/pop/peek and O(n) traversal, but uses 2+2n memory. A naive array version give a minimum of 2+n (about optimal), but is usually worse, and sometimes causes modifications to take longer (for reallocation).

struct Queue
    {
    size_t len;
    size_t head;
    void (*data)[];
    }

/*
    +-----+
    |* * *-----~~~-+
    +|-|--+        |
     v +-+         |
    +----v-----~~~-v+
    |0 0 a b c . . z|
    +----------~~~--+
*/

It looks like there is no way to improve memory usage with sacrificing preformance, but i wanted to at least put this out there in case anyone knows a way around this.

Edit (because i cant have code in comments):

struct QueueItem
{
    QueueItem* next;
    size_t len;
    void (*data)[];
    }

struct Queue
    {
    QueueItem* head;
    QueueItem* tail;
    size_t start;
    size_t end; //edit: need to know where to push data. edit: not per-item
    }

/*
    +-----+
    |* * *------------------------------+
    +|-|--+                             |
     v +---+        (2x longer)         v (much longer)
    +------v----+  +-----------+       +---------------+
    |@ 0 0 a b *-->|@ c . . h *-->...->|@ . . . x y z 0|
    +-----------+  +-----------+       +---------------+
*/
share|improve this question
    
Hmm. In your current solution, you show each new QueueItem with an array 2x longer than the last. I don't think this is a good idea if you are popping items off the queue. Now the longer your queue lives, the more wasted space you will have, independent of how large the queue is at any moment. –  cape1232 Jul 18 '10 at 5:47
    
@cape1232, yeah, i'm still on "make it work" for the new structure; i'll add size capping later. –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 5:49
    
@$re: size capping, how about initial size = 1 and no chunklen*=2 if q->head->next == q->tail (ie: if nchunks(q) == 2) that way chunksize still grows quickly as items are added (reducing overhead by a factor of 2 with each new chunk), but stablizes between len/3 and len/2 when you start consuming items. When items are consumed rapidly enough to keep the queue depleted, it alternates between 4 and 7 pointer widths, which is fine if there are a fixed number of queues and not too bad if there are more (in which case large memory use is likely to happen anyway). –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 7:26
    
what exact operations shall the queue offer? –  Dave O. Jul 18 '10 at 10:23
    
@Dave, the main ones are push (add a item to the end of the queue), pop (remove and return a item from the front of the queue), and peek (like pop, but dont remove the item); i also added prepend (add an item to front of queue), since it is trivial to add and might be useful. All of these operations are effectively O(1), though memory allocation may interfere with push or prepend (or fail). Theres also traverse (callback on each queued item) which is neccesarily O(n). –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 10:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, I think you neglect the cost of allocating the QueueItems. So the allocation costs between your two approaches is the same. (Someone more knowledgeable about memory allocation, please speak up if I'm wrong.)

You can do this to alleviate the wasted space for popped/unfilled items in the array. Make a hybrid of the list and array. Let each list node contain an array of size K.

struct QueueItem
    {
    QueueItem* next;
    void (*data)[K];
    }

struct Queue
    {
    QueueItem* head;
    QueueItem* tail;
    size_t head;
    size_t end;
    }

Now your performance is dictated by the size you choose for the array. The smaller it is, the less wasted space you have. The larger it is, the less your QueueItem overhead costs you as a percentage of overall space. If you knew, say, that your queue will usually be of size N, then you might choose K to be N/10. In that case, the total memory cost is N/K + 4 + N. The maximum amount of space you can waste in the arrays on unused elements is 2*K - 2.

Usage patterns will dictate actual performance. But if you can anticipate your usage pattern, you can choose a K that works well. There might even be a way to adaptively choose K differently for each node to get even better performance, but I think that's beyond me right now.

share|improve this answer
    
Gaak, comment desync, see edit. –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 5:31
    
Also, item->head doesnt have to be per-item, since all but q->head should be full. –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 5:33
    
@David X Sorry about the comment desync. Probably because I deleted my first answer. –  cape1232 Jul 18 '10 at 5:37
    
@David X re: item->head: nice. As per your edit, we also need an end. I'll edit. –  cape1232 Jul 18 '10 at 5:39
    
@$re:end, which doesn't need to be per-item either now i have to fix my answer edit again. –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 5:44

If Your queue has a maximum capacity and You only manipulate its front or tail, I would use a Circular Array. The following image is from the linked site and illustrates the idea behind circular arrays:

circular array

To quote:

  • Rear of the queue is somewhere clockwise from the front
  • To enqueue an element, we move rear one position clockwise and write the element in that position
  • To dequeue, we simply move front one position clockwise
  • Queue migrates in a clockwise direction as we enqueue and dequeue emptiness and fullness to be checked carefully.

With this kind of data structure You obviously can't insert elements between two sequent elements already stored and You can't surpass a certain maximum capacity - I hope it suits Your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
=arge (huge, limited by address space, ie: effectivly unlimited) maximum capacity is kind of the point, otherwise i wouldnt be trying to optimize for space in the first place. –  David X Jul 18 '10 at 13:44
    
If you use a fixed-size circular array of size N, you will waste a huge amount of space when the queue is small. –  cape1232 Jul 18 '10 at 15:10
    
@cape1232 naturally –  Dave O. Jul 18 '10 at 21:59

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