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What is best for storing passwords? Should I be Encrypting or hashing password for you users table ?

What do you prefer, and why? Could you please provide an example of secure password storage.

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Please see codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000953.html –  Greg Hewgill Jul 18 '10 at 10:55
    
What speed? Are your running on a 486 chip or you have to hash 2.5 gazillion passes per sec? Dude, what the hack are you "optimizing" for?! –  sibidiba Jul 18 '10 at 13:53
    
thanks rock! you saved me there. –  Adam Ramadhan Jul 18 '10 at 17:48
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Considering passwords generally don't have to be checked / hashed / whatever that often (they are when one is logging in, and registrering ; but that's pretty much it), speed is generaly not much of a concern : what matters is security.

What's generally done is :

  • when a user registers, he types his (new) password)
  • that password is salted + hashed, and the result is stored in database
  • Then, when a user wants to log-in, he types his password
  • What is typed is salted + hashed, and compared to the value stored in the database.

The main key is : never store the real password in the DB -- only a hash of it ; and salt it before hand, to avoid attacks by rainbow-tables.

And it seems this is already what you're doing -- so good point for you ;-)


Which hashing function should be used ? Well, sha1 is often considered as OK ; md5 is less OK now ; sha512 should be more than OK, I guess.

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but isnt it overkill ? how about you , how do you just do it. ? –  Adam Ramadhan Jul 18 '10 at 11:04
2  
@Adam, considering security, there's no such thing as overkill ;-). Of course, it might be that your password hashing scheme is unbreakable and irrelevant because you may have a hardcoded admin account with "0000" as password. A system is only as secure as its weakest component and those are often hard to find. However, you can then be sure that it very likely won't be your password hashing what's the culprit and doing it wrongly or good usually takes the same amount of effort so I think it's a no-brainer. –  Јοеу Jul 18 '10 at 11:08
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I'd do this usually:

<?php

function createHash($pwd, $salt = ''){
  $hash = '';
  if(!$salt){
    $salt = hash('sha256',mt_rand().time().$pwd.'2130A');
  }
  if($pwd[0] & 0){
    if($pwd[strlen($pwd)-1] & 1){
      $hash = hash('sha256', $pwd.$salt).$salt;
    }else{
      $hash = $salt.hash('sha256', $pwd.$salt);
    }
  }else{
    if($pwd[strlen($pwd)-1] & 1){
      $hash = $salt.hash('sha256',$salt.$pwd);
    }else{
      $hash = hash('sha256', $salt.$pwd).$salt;
    }
  }
  return $hash;
}

function getSalt($pwdHash){
  if($pwd[0] & 0){
    if($pwd[strlen($pwd)-1] & 1){
      $salt = substr($pwdHash,64);
    }else{
      $salt = substr($pwdHash,0,64);
    }
  }else{
    if($pwd[strlen($pwd)-1] & 1){
      $salt = substr($pwdHash,0,64);
    }else{
      $salt = substr($pwdHash,64);
    }
  }
  return $salt;
}

var_dump(createHash('testPassword',getSalt($pwdHashFromDb)) == $pwdHashFromDb); // true
  • Salting provides higher security than a usual hash.
  • The salt position depends on the entered password, and thus this makes the salt less vulnerable to be captured.
  • Raw password is never known or stored
  • balance between security and speed (for websites).
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whats the 2130A ? –  Adam Ramadhan Jul 27 '10 at 6:02
    
it's a static salt. something like a secret key. –  mauris Jul 28 '10 at 1:14
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Hashing rather than encrypting passwords can help protect you against insider threats. Since the hash is a one-way process, for the most part users' stored, hashed passwords should not be decipherable. Rather, you can only run newly-inputted password attempts through the same has to see if the result is the same.

If you store encrypted passwords I would think that would imply that they could also be decrypted, which might be problematic if you have an untrustworthy insider.

This might be a good answer to the interview question, "How can you stop your DBA from making off with a list of your users’ passwords?"

I have posted a question here What is the right method for encoding hashed passwords for storage in RavenDB? with some sample code. Though the question itself might prove to be boneheaded, perhaps the code sample can be useful to you, if the c# code is intelligible.

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