Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following array:

/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd
/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz
/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def
/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz
/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd

what is the shortest and most elegant way of detecting the common base path - in this case

/www/htdocs/1/sites/

and removing it from all elements in the array?

lib/abcdedd
conf/xyz
conf/abc/def
htdocs/xyz
lib2/abcdedd
share|improve this question
82  
+1 I love the question title. –  BoltClock Jul 18 '10 at 11:32
3  
This might be worth trying: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Algorithm_implementation/Strings/… (I tried it and it works). –  Richard Knop Jul 19 '10 at 9:05
1  
Awwww! Such a lot of brilliant input. I will be taking one to solve my problem at hand, but I feel that to really pick a justified accepted answer, I'll have to compare the solutions. It may take a while until I get around to doing that, but I certainly will. –  Pekka 웃 Jul 19 '10 at 12:39
4  
What have you tried? :P –  Kev Jun 18 '12 at 15:42
2  
no accepted answer for two years? –  Gordon Jun 18 '12 at 19:44

16 Answers 16

$common = PHP_INT_MAX;
foreach ($a as $item) {
        $common = min($common, str_common($a[0], $item, $common));
}

$result = array();
foreach ($a as $item) {
        $result[] = substr($item, $common);
}
print_r($result);

function str_common($a, $b, $max)
{
        $pos = 0;
        $last_slash = 0;
        $len = min(strlen($a), strlen($b), $max + 1);
        while ($pos < $len) {
                if ($a{$pos} != $b{$pos}) return $last_slash;
                if ($a{$pos} == '/') $last_slash = $pos;
                $pos++;
        }
        return $last_slash;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the best solution posted, but it needed improvement. It didn't take the previous longest common path into account (possibly iterating over more of the string than necessary), and didn't take paths into account (so for /usr/lib and /usr/lib2 it gave /usr/lib as the longest common path, rather than /usr/). I (hopefully) fixed both. –  Gabe Jul 18 '10 at 15:41

Load them into a trie data structure. Starting from the parent node, see which is having a children count great than one. Once you find that magic node, just dismantle the parent node structure and have the current node as root.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 for linear efficiency. –  el.pescado Jul 18 '10 at 11:25
10  
Wouldn't the operation that loads the data into the trie tree structure you describe kinda include the algorithm to find the longest common prefix, thus making actually using a tree structure unnecessary? Ie why check the tree for multiple children when you could detect that while building the tree. Why then a tree at all? I mean if you start with an array already. If you can change the storage to just using a trie instead of arrays I guess it makes sense. –  Ben Schwehn Jul 18 '10 at 15:21
2  
I think that if you are careful then my solution is more efficient than building a trie. –  starblue Jul 24 '10 at 19:50
    
This answer is wrong. There are trivial solutions posted in my and other answers that are O(n). –  Ari Ronen Aug 8 '10 at 6:06
    
@el.pescado: Tries are quadradic in size with the length of the source string in the worst case. –  Billy ONeal May 8 '12 at 17:06

I would explode the values based on the / and then use array_intersect_assoc to detect the common elements and ensure they have the correct corresponding index in the array. The resulting array could be recombined to produce the common path.

function getCommonPath($pathArray)
{
    $pathElements = array();

    foreach($pathArray as $path)
    {
        $pathElements[] = explode("/",$path);
    }

    $commonPath = $pathElements[0];

    for($i=1;$i<count($pathElements);$i++)
    {
        $commonPath = array_intersect_assoc($commonPath,$pathElements[$i]);
    }

    if(is_array($commonPath) return implode("/",$commonPath);
    else return null;
}

function removeCommonPath($pathArray)
{
    $commonPath = getCommonPath($pathArray());

    for($i=0;$i<count($pathArray);$i++)
    {
        $pathArray[$i] = substr($pathArray[$i],str_len($commonPath));
    }

    return $pathArray;
}

This is untested, but, the idea is that the $commonPath array only ever contains the elements of the path that have been contained in all path arrays that have been compared against it. When the loop is complete, we simply recombine it with / to get the true $commonPath

Update As pointed out by Felix Kling, array_intersect won't consider paths that have common elements but in different orders... To solve this, I used array_intersect_assoc instead of array_intersect

Update Added code to remove the common path (or tetris it!) from the array as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This probably won't work. Consider /a/b/c/d and /d/c/b/a. Same elements, different paths. –  Felix Kling Jul 18 '10 at 11:18
    
Good point, I'll have to think about that one! :) –  Brendan Bullen Jul 18 '10 at 11:25
    
@Felix Kling I've updated to use array_intersect_assoc which also performs an index check –  Brendan Bullen Jul 18 '10 at 11:31

A naive approach would be to explode the paths at the / and successive compare every element in the arrays. So e.g. the first element would be empty in all arrays, so it will be removed, the next element will be www, it is the same in all arrays, so it gets removed, etc.

Something like (untested)

$exploded_paths = array();

foreach($paths as $path) {
    $exploded_paths[] = explode('/', $path);
}

$equal = true;
$ref = &$exploded_paths[0]; // compare against the first path for simplicity

while($equal) {   
    foreach($exploded_paths as $path_parts) {
        if($path_parts[0] !== $ref[0]) {
            $equal = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    if($equal) {
        foreach($exploded_paths as &$path_parts) {
            array_shift($path_parts); // remove the first element
        }
    }
}

Afterwards you just have to implode the elements in $exploded_paths again:

function impl($arr) {
    return '/' . implode('/', $arr);
}
$paths = array_map('impl', $exploded_paths);

Which gives me:

Array
(
    [0] => /lib/abcdedd
    [1] => /conf/xyz
    [2] => /conf/abc/def
    [3] => /htdocs/xyz
    [4] => /conf/xyz
)

This might not scale well ;)

share|improve this answer
$values = array('/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd'
);


function splitArrayValues($r) {
    return explode('/',$r);
}

function stripCommon($values) {
    $testValues = array_map('splitArrayValues',$values);

    $i = 0;
    foreach($testValues[0] as $key => $value) {
        foreach($testValues as $arraySetValues) {
            if ($arraySetValues[$key] != $value) break 2;
        }
        $i++;
    }

    $returnArray = array();
    foreach($testValues as $value) {
        $returnArray[] = implode('/',array_slice($value,$i));
    }

    return $returnArray;
}


$newValues = stripCommon($values);

echo '<pre>';
var_dump($newValues);
echo '</pre>';

EDIT Variant of my original method using an array_walk to rebuild the array

$values = array('/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
                '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd'
);


function splitArrayValues($r) {
    return explode('/',$r);
}

function rejoinArrayValues(&$r,$d,$i) {
    $r = implode('/',array_slice($r,$i));
}

function stripCommon($values) {
    $testValues = array_map('splitArrayValues',$values);

    $i = 0;
    foreach($testValues[0] as $key => $value) {
        foreach($testValues as $arraySetValues) {
            if ($arraySetValues[$key] != $value) break 2;
        }
        $i++;
    }

    array_walk($testValues, 'rejoinArrayValues', $i);

    return $testValues;
}


$newValues = stripCommon($values);

echo '<pre>';
var_dump($newValues);
echo '</pre>';

EDIT

The most efficient and elegant answer is likely to involve taking functions and methods from each of the provided answers

share|improve this answer

This has de advantage of not having linear time complexity; however, for most cases the sort will definitely not be the operation taking more time.

Basically, the clever part (at least I couldn't find a fault with it) here is that after sorting you will only have to compare the first path with the last.

sort($a);
$a = array_map(function ($el) { return explode("/", $el); }, $a);
$first = reset($a);
$last = end($a);
for ($eqdepth = 0; $first[$eqdepth] === $last[$eqdepth]; $eqdepth++) {}
array_walk($a,
    function (&$el) use ($eqdepth) {
        for ($i = 0; $i < $eqdepth; $i++) {
            array_shift($el);
        }
     });
$res = array_map(function ($el) { return implode("/", $el); }, $a);
share|improve this answer

Write a function longest_common_prefix that takes two strings as input. Then apply it to the strings in any order to reduce them to their common prefix. Since it is associative and commutative the order doesn't matter for the result.

This is the same as for other binary operations like for example addition or greatest common divisor.

share|improve this answer
8  
+1. After comparing the first 2 strings, use the result (common path) to compare against 3rd string and so on. –  Milan Babuškov Jul 18 '10 at 15:20
$arrMain = array(
            '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
            '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
            '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def',
            '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
            '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd'
);
function explodePath( $strPath ){ 
    return explode("/", $strPath);
}

function removePath( $strPath)
{
    global $strCommon;
    return str_replace( $strCommon, '', $strPath );
}
$arrExplodedPaths = array_map( 'explodePath', $arrMain ) ;

//Check for common and skip first 1
$strCommon = '';
for( $i=1; $i< count( $arrExplodedPaths[0] ); $i++)
{
    for( $j = 0; $j < count( $arrExplodedPaths); $j++ )
    {
        if( $arrExplodedPaths[0][ $i ] !== $arrExplodedPaths[ $j ][ $i ] )
        {
            break 2;
        } 
    }
    $strCommon .= '/'.$arrExplodedPaths[0][$i];
}
print_r( array_map( 'removePath', $arrMain ) );

This works fine... similar to mark baker but uses str_replace

share|improve this answer

Ok, I'm not sure this is bullet-proof, but I think it works:

echo array_reduce($array, function($reducedValue, $arrayValue) {
    if($reducedValue === NULL) return $arrayValue;
    for($i = 0; $i < strlen($reducedValue); $i++) {
        if(!isset($arrayValue[$i]) || $arrayValue[$i] !== $reducedValue[$i]) {
            return substr($reducedValue, 0, $i);
        }
    }
    return $reducedValue;
});

This will take the first value in the array as reference string. Then it will iterate over the reference string and compare each char with the char of the second string at the same position. If a char doesnt match, the reference string will be shortened to the position of the char and the next string is compared. The function will return the shortest matching string then.

Performance depends on the strings given. The earlier the reference string gets shorter, the quicker the code will finish. I really have no clue how to put that in a formula though.

I found that Artefacto's approach to sort the strings increases performance. Adding

asort($array);
$array = array(array_shift($array), array_pop($array));

before the array_reduce will significantly increase performance.

Also note that this will return the longest matching initial substring, which is more versatile but wont give you the common path. You have to run

substr($result, 0, strrpos($result, '/'));

on the result. And then you can use the result to remove the values

print_r(array_map(function($v) use ($path){
    return str_replace($path, '', $v);
}, $array));

which should give:

[0] => /lib/abcdedd
[1] => /conf/xyz/
[2] => /conf/abc/def
[3] => /htdocs/xyz
[4] => /lib2/abcdedd

Feedback welcome.

share|improve this answer

The problem can be simplified if just viewed from the string comparison angle. This is probably faster than array-splitting:

$longest = $tetris[0];  # or array_pop()
foreach ($tetris as $cmp) {
        while (strncmp($longest+"/", $cmp, strlen($longest)+1) !== 0) {
                $longest = substr($longest, 0, strrpos($longest, "/"));
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work e.g. with this set array('/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def', '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz', '/www/htdocs/1/sitesjj/lib2/abcdedd',). –  Artefacto Jul 18 '10 at 13:27
    
@Artefacto: You were right. So I've simply modified it to always include a trailing slash "/" in the comparison. Makes it non-ambiguous. –  mario Jul 18 '10 at 14:10

Probably too naive and noobish but it works. I have used this algorithm:

<?php

function strlcs($str1, $str2){
    $str1Len = strlen($str1);
    $str2Len = strlen($str2);
    $ret = array();

    if($str1Len == 0 || $str2Len == 0)
        return $ret; //no similarities

    $CSL = array(); //Common Sequence Length array
    $intLargestSize = 0;

    //initialize the CSL array to assume there are no similarities
    for($i=0; $i<$str1Len; $i++){
        $CSL[$i] = array();
        for($j=0; $j<$str2Len; $j++){
            $CSL[$i][$j] = 0;
        }
    }

    for($i=0; $i<$str1Len; $i++){
        for($j=0; $j<$str2Len; $j++){
            //check every combination of characters
            if( $str1[$i] == $str2[$j] ){
                //these are the same in both strings
                if($i == 0 || $j == 0)
                    //it's the first character, so it's clearly only 1 character long
                    $CSL[$i][$j] = 1; 
                else
                    //it's one character longer than the string from the previous character
                    $CSL[$i][$j] = $CSL[$i-1][$j-1] + 1; 

                if( $CSL[$i][$j] > $intLargestSize ){
                    //remember this as the largest
                    $intLargestSize = $CSL[$i][$j]; 
                    //wipe any previous results
                    $ret = array();
                    //and then fall through to remember this new value
                }
                if( $CSL[$i][$j] == $intLargestSize )
                    //remember the largest string(s)
                    $ret[] = substr($str1, $i-$intLargestSize+1, $intLargestSize);
            }
            //else, $CSL should be set to 0, which it was already initialized to
        }
    }
    //return the list of matches
    return $ret;
}


$arr = array(
'/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
'/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
'/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def',
'/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
'/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd'
);

// find the common substring
$longestCommonSubstring = strlcs( $arr[0], $arr[1] );

// remvoe the common substring
foreach ($arr as $k => $v) {
    $arr[$k] = str_replace($longestCommonSubstring[0], '', $v);
}
var_dump($arr);

Output:

array(5) {
  [0]=>
  string(11) "lib/abcdedd"
  [1]=>
  string(8) "conf/xyz"
  [2]=>
  string(12) "conf/abc/def"
  [3]=>
  string(10) "htdocs/xyz"
  [4]=>
  string(12) "lib2/abcdedd"
}

:)

share|improve this answer
    
@Doomsday There is a link to wikipedia in my answer... try to read it first before commenting. –  Richard Knop Jul 22 '10 at 16:23
    
I think in the end you only compare the first two paths. In your example this works, but if you remove the first path, it will find /www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/ as a common match. Also, the algorithm searches for substrings starting anywhere in the string, but for this question you know you can start at location 0, which makes it much simpler. –  Jan Fabry Aug 9 '10 at 6:58

Perhaps porting the algorithm Python's os.path.commonprefix(m) uses would work?

def commonprefix(m):
    "Given a list of pathnames, returns the longest common leading component"
    if not m: return ''
    s1 = min(m)
    s2 = max(m)
    n = min(len(s1), len(s2))
    for i in xrange(n):
        if s1[i] != s2[i]:
            return s1[:i]
    return s1[:n]

That is, uh... something like

function commonprefix($m) {
  if(!$m) return "";
  $s1 = min($m);
  $s2 = max($m);
  $n = min(strlen($s1), strlen($s2));
  for($i=0;$i<$n;$i++) if($s1[$i] != $s2[$i]) return substr($s1, 0, $i);
  return substr($s1, 0, $n);
}

After that you can just substr each element of the original list with the length of the common prefix as the start offset.

share|improve this answer

You could remove prefix the fastest way, reading each character only once:

function findLongestWord($lines, $delim = "/")
{
    $max = 0;
    $len = strlen($lines[0]); 

    // read first string once
    for($i = 0; $i < $len; $i++) {
        for($n = 1; $n < count($lines); $n++) {
            if($lines[0][$i] != $lines[$n][$i]) {
                // we've found a difference between current token
                // stop search:
                return $max;
            }
        }
        if($lines[0][$i] == $delim) {
            // we've found a complete token:
            $max = $i + 1;
        }
    }
    return $max;
}

$max = findLongestWord($lines);
// cut prefix of len "max"
for($n = 0; $n < count($lines); $n++) {
    $lines[$n] = substr(lines[$n], $max, $len);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, a character-based comparison will be the fastest. All the other solutions use "expensive" operators that in the end also will do (multiple) character comparisons. It was even mentioned in the scriptures of the Holy Joel! –  Jan Fabry Aug 9 '10 at 7:03

I'll throw my hat in the ring …

function longestCommonPrefix($a, $b) {
    $i = 0;
    $end = min(strlen($a), strlen($b));
    while ($i < $end && $a[$i] == $b[$i]) $i++;
    return substr($a, 0, $i);
}

function longestCommonPrefixFromArray(array $strings) {
    $count = count($strings);
    if (!$count) return '';
    $prefix = reset($strings);
    for ($i = 1; $i < $count; $i++)
        $prefix = longestCommonPrefix($prefix, $strings[$i]);
    return $prefix;
}

function stripPrefix(&$string, $foo, $length) {
    $string = substr($string, $length);
}

Usage:

$paths = array(
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd',
);

$longComPref = longestCommonPrefixFromArray($paths);
array_walk($paths, 'stripPrefix', strlen($longComPref));
print_r($paths);
share|improve this answer

Well, there are already some solutions here but, just because it was fun:

$values = array(
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib/abcdedd',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/xyz',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/conf/abc/def', 
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/htdocs/xyz',
    '/www/htdocs/1/sites/lib2/abcdedd' 
);

function findCommon($values){
    $common = false;
    foreach($values as &$p){
        $p = explode('/', $p);
        if(!$common){
            $common = $p;
        } else {
            $common = array_intersect_assoc($common, $p);
        }
    }
    return $common;
}
function removeCommon($values, $common){
    foreach($values as &$p){
        $p = explode('/', $p);
        $p = array_diff_assoc($p, $common);
        $p = implode('/', $p);
    }

    return $values;
}

echo '<pre>';
print_r(removeCommon($values, findCommon($values)));
echo '</pre>';

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => lib/abcdedd
    [1] => conf/xyz
    [2] => conf/abc/def
    [3] => htdocs/xyz
    [4] => lib2/abcdedd
)
share|improve this answer

Well, considering that you can use XOR in this situation to find the common parts of the string. Any time you xor two bytes that are the same, you get a nullbyte as the output. So we can use that to our advantage:

$first = $array[0];
$length = strlen($first);
$count = count($array);
for ($i = 1; $i < $count; $i++) {
    $length = min($length, strspn($array[$i] ^ $first, chr(0)));
}

After that single loop, the $length variable will be equal to the longest common basepart between the array of strings. Then, we can extract the common part from the first element:

$common = substr($array[0], 0, $length);

And there you have it. As a function:

function commonPrefix(array $strings) {
    $first = $strings[0];
    $length = strlen($first);
    $count = count($strings);
    for ($i = 1; $i < $count; $i++) {
        $length = min($length, strspn($strings[$i] ^ $first, chr(0)));
    }
    return substr($first, 0, $length);
}

Note that it does use more than one iteration, but those iterations are done in libraries, so in interpreted languages this will have a huge efficiency gain...

Now, if you want only full paths, we need to truncate to the last / character. So:

$prefix = preg_replace('#/[^/]*$', '', commonPrefix($paths));

Now, it may overly cut two strings such as /foo/bar and /foo/bar/baz will be cut to /foo. But short of adding another iteration round to determine if the next character is either / or end-of-string, I can't see a way around that...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.