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If I have a function that needs to work with a shared_ptr, wouldn't it be more efficient to pass it a reference to it (so to avoid copying the shared_ptr object)? What are the possible bad side effects? I envision two possible cases:

1) inside the function a copy is made of the argument, like in

ClassA::take_copy_of_sp(boost::shared_ptr<foo> &sp)  
{  
     ...  
     m_sp_member=sp; //This will copy the object, incrementing refcount  
     ...  
}

2) inside the function the argument is only used, like in

Class::only_work_with_sp(boost::shared_ptr<foo> &sp) //Again, no copy here  
{    
    ...  
    sp->do_something();  
    ...  
}

I can't see in both cases a good reason to pass the boost::shared_ptr by value instead of by reference. Passing by value would only "temporarily" increment the reference count due to the copying, and then decrement it when exiting the function scope. Am I overlooking something?

Andrea.

EDIT:
Just to clarify, after reading several answers : I perfectly agree on the premature-optimization concerns, and I alwasy try to first-profile-then-work-on-the-hotspots. My question was more from a purely technical code-point-of-view, if you know what I mean.

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I don't know if you can modify the tags of your question, but please try to add a boost tag in there. I tried looking for this question but I couldn't find any because I looked for boost and smart-pointer tags. So I found your question just after composing my own question –  Edison Gustavo Muenz Mar 6 '09 at 17:09

16 Answers 16

up vote 81 down vote accepted

The point of a distinct shared_ptr instance is to guarantee (as far as possible) that as long as this shared_ptr is in scope, the object it points to will still exist, because its reference count will be at least 1.

Class::only_work_with_sp(boost::shared_ptr<foo> sp)
{
    // sp points to an object that cannot be destroyed during this function
}

So by using a reference to a shared_ptr, you disable that guarantee. So in your second case:

Class::only_work_with_sp(boost::shared_ptr<foo> &sp) //Again, no copy here  
{    
    ...  
    sp->do_something();  
    ...  
}

How do you know that sp->do_something() will not blow up due to a null pointer?

It all depends what is in those '...' sections of the code. What if you call something during the first '...' that has the side-effect (somewhere in another part of the code) of clearing a shared_ptr to that same object? And what if it happens to be the only remaining distinct shared_ptr to that object? Bye bye object, just where you're about to try and use it.

So there are two ways to answer that question:

  1. Examine the source of your entire program very carefully until you are sure the object won't die during the function body.

  2. Change the parameter back to be a distinct object instead of a reference.

General bit of advice that applies here: don't bother making risky changes to your code for the sake of performance until you've timed your product in a realistic situation in a profiler and conclusively measured that the change you want to make will make a significant difference to performance.

Update for commenter JQ

Here's a contrived example. It's deliberately simple, so the mistake will be obvious. In real examples, the mistake is not so obvious because it is hidden in layers of real detail.

We have a function that will send a message somewhere. It may be a large message so rather than using a std::string that likely gets copied as it is passed around to multiple places, we use a shared_ptr to a string:

void send_message(std::shared_ptr<std::string> msg)
{
    std::cout << (*msg.get()) << std::endl;
}

(We just "send" it to the console for this example).

Now we want to add a facility to remember the previous message. We want the following behaviour: a variable must exist that contains the most recently sent message, but while a message is currently being sent then there must be no previous message (the variable should be reset before sending). So we declare the new variable:

std::shared_ptr<std::string> previous_message;

Then we amend our function according to the rules we specified:

void send_message(std::shared_ptr<std::string> msg)
{
    previous_message = 0;
    std::cout << *msg << std::endl;
    previous_message = msg;
}

So, before we start sending we discard the current previous message, and then after the send is complete we can store the new previous message. All good. Here's some test code:

send_message(std::shared_ptr<std::string>(new std::string("Hi")));
send_message(previous_message);

And as expected, this prints Hi! twice.

Now along comes Mr Maintainer, who looks at the code and thinks: Hey, that parameter to send_message is a shared_ptr:

void send_message(std::shared_ptr<std::string> msg)

Obviously that can be changed to:

void send_message(const std::shared_ptr<std::string> &msg)

Think of the performance enhancement this will bring! (Never mind that we're about to send a typically large message over some channel, so the performance enhancement will be so small as to be unmeasureable).

But the real problem is that now the test code will exhibit undefined behaviour (in Visual C++ 2010 debug builds, it crashes).

Mr Maintainer is surprised by this, but adds a defensive check to send_message in an attempt to stop the problem happening:

void send_message(const std::shared_ptr<std::string> &msg)
{
    if (msg == 0)
        return;

But of course it still goes ahead and crashes, because msg is never null when send_message is called.

As I say, with all the code so close together in a trivial example, it's easy to find the mistake. But in real programs, with more complex relationships between mutable objects that hold pointers to each other, it is easy to make the mistake, and hard to construct the necessary test cases to detect the mistake.

The easy solution, where you want a function to be able to rely on a shared_ptr continuing to be non-null throughout, is for the function to allocate its own true shared_ptr, rather than relying on a reference to an existing shared_ptr.

The downside is that copied a shared_ptr is not free: even "lock-free" implementations have to use an interlocked operation to honour threading guarantees. So there may be situations where a program can be significantly sped up by changing a shared_ptr into a shared_ptr &. But it this is not a change that can be safely made to all programs. It changes the logical meaning of the program.

Note that a similar bug would occur if we used std::string throughout instead of std::shared_ptr<std::string>, and instead of:

previous_message = 0;

to clear the message, we said:

previous_message.clear();

Then the symptom would be the accidental sending of an empty message, instead of undefined behaviour. The cost of an extra copy of a very large string may be a lot more significant than the cost of copying a shared_ptr, so the trade-off may be different.

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12  
The shared_ptr that is passed in already lives in a scope, at the call site. You might be able to create an elaborate scenario where the code in this question would blow up due to a dangling pointer, but then I suppose you have bigger problems than the reference parameter! –  Magnus Hoff Nov 30 '08 at 14:48
8  
It may be stored in a member. You may call something that happens to clear that member. The whole point of smart_ptr is to avoid having to coordinate lifetimes in hierarchies or scopes that nest around the call stack, so that's why it's best to assume that lifetimes don't do that in such programs. –  Daniel Earwicker Nov 30 '08 at 19:47
5  
It's not really my viewpoint though! If you think what I'm saying is something specific to do with my code, you may not have understood me. I'm talking about an unavoidable implication of the reason shared_ptr exists in the first place: many object lifetimes are not simply related to function calls. –  Daniel Earwicker Nov 30 '08 at 23:19
2  
The bug in the second example has nothing to do with shared_ptr. Replace the std::shared_ptr<std::string> argument with anything else -- an std::string, for example -- and the code still breaks by trashing the msg argument through the global previous_message. The only difference is that the std::shared_ptr<std::string> version will crash instead of giving bad output, and that's because send_message() isn't ensuring that the pointer is valid before using it (which it needs to do regardless of whether or not the shared_ptr is passed by reference). –  Josh Townzen Jun 21 '12 at 2:36
5  
@DanielEarwicker completely agree with all your points and am surprised by the level of opposition. Something that makes your concerns even more relevant is threading, when this becomes involved guarantees about an objects validity become much more important. Good answer. –  radman Mar 9 '13 at 0:04

I found myself disagreeing with the highest-voted answer, so I went looking for expert opinons and here they are. From http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/C-and-Beyond-2011-Scott-Andrei-and-Herb-Ask-Us-Anything

Herb Sutter: "when you pass shared_ptr's, copies are expensive"

Scott Meyers: "There's nothing special about shared_ptr when it comes to whether you pass it by value, or pass it by reference. Use exactly the same analysis you use for any other user defined type. People seem to have this perception that shared_ptr somehow solves all management problems, and that because it's small, it's necessarily inexpensive to pass by value. It has to be copied, and there is a cost associated with that... it's expensive to pass it by value, so if I can get away with it with proper semantics in my program, I'm gonna pass it by reference to const or reference instead"

Herb Sutter: "always pass them by reference to const, and very occasionally maybe because you know what you called might modify the thing you got a reference from, maybe then you might pass by value... if you copy them as parameters, oh my goodness you almost never need to bump that reference count because it's being held alive anyway, and you should be passing it by reference, so please do that"

Update: Herb has expanded on this here: http://herbsutter.com/2013/06/05/gotw-91-solution-smart-pointer-parameters/, although the moral of the story is that you shouldn't be passing shared_ptr's at all "unless you want to use or manipulate the smart pointer itself, such as to share or transfer ownership."

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5  
Nice find! It's great to see two of the foremost experts on the subject publicly refuting the conventional wisdom on SO. –  Stephan Tolksdorf Feb 1 '12 at 13:30
3  
"There's nothing special about shared_ptr when it comes to whether you pass it by value, or pass it by reference" -- I really don't agree with this. It IS special. Personally I would rather play it safe, and take the slight performance hit. If there is a particular area of code I need to optimize then sure, I'd look at performance benefits of shared_ptr pass by const ref. –  JasonZ Feb 13 '12 at 21:00
2  
It's also interesting to note that, while there was agreement on overuse of shared_ptrs, there wasn't agreement about the pass-by-value-vs.-reference issue. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 1 '12 at 1:17
2  
Scott Meyers: "so if I can get away with it with proper semantics in my program..." i.e. doesn't contradict my answer at all, which points out that figuring out whether changing parameters to const & will affect semantics is only easy in very simple programs. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 8 '12 at 15:49
5  
Herb Sutter: "very occasionally maybe because you know what you called might modify the thing you got a reference from". Again, that little exemption for a minor case, so it doesn't contradict my answer. The question remains: how do you know it's safe to use a const ref? Very easy to prove in a simple program, not so easy in a complex program. But hey, this is C++, and so we favour premature micro-optimisation over almost all other engineering concerns, right?! :) –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 8 '12 at 15:51

I would advise against this practice unless you and the other programmers you work with really, really know what you are all doing.

First, you have no idea how the interface to your class might evolve and you want to prevent other programmers from doing bad things. Passing a shared_ptr by reference isn't something a programmer should expect to see, because it isn't idiomatic, and that makes it easy to use it incorrectly. Program defensively: make the interface hard to use incorrectly. Passing by reference is just going to invite problems later on.

Second, don't optimize until you know this particular class is going to be a problem. Profile first, and then if your program really needs the boost given by passing by reference, then maybe. Otherwise, don't sweat the small stuff (i.e. the extra N instructions it takes to pass by value) instead worry about design, data structures, algorithms, and long-term maintainability.

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My thoughts exactly! +1 –  divideandconquer.se Nov 29 '08 at 16:42
    
Although litb's answer is technically correct, never underestimate the "laziness" of programmers (I'm lazy too!). littlenag's answer is better, that a reference to a shared_ptr will be unexpected, and possibly (probably) an unnecessary optimization that makes future maintenance more challenging. –  netjeff Nov 30 '08 at 5:00

Yes, taking a reference is fine there. You don't intend to give the method shared ownership; it only wants to work with it. You could take a reference for the first case too, since you copy it anyway. But for first case, it takes ownership. There is this trick to still copy it only once:

void ClassA::take_copy_of_sp(boost::shared_ptr<foo> sp) {
    m_sp_member.swap(sp);
}

You should also copy when you return it (i.e not return a reference). Because your class doesn't know what the client is doing with it (it could store a pointer to it and then big bang happens). If it later turns out it's a bottleneck (first profile!), then you can still return a reference.


Edit: Of course, as others point out, this only is true if you know your code and know that you don't reset the passed shared pointer in some way. If in doubt, just pass by value.

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It is sensible to pass shared_ptrs by const&. It will not likely cause trouble (except in the unlikely case that the referenced shared_ptr is deleted during the function call, as detailed by Earwicker) and it will likely be faster if you pass a lot of these around. Remember; the default boost::shared_ptr is thread safe, so copying it includes a thread safe increment.

Try to use const& rather than just &, because temporary objects may not be passed by non-const reference. (Even though a language extension in MSVC allows you to do it anyway)

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3  
Yes, I always use const references, I just forgot to put it in my example. Anyway, MSVC allows to bind non-const references to temporaries not for a bug, but because by default it has the property "C/C++ -> Language -> Disable Language Extension" set to "NO". Enable it and it won't compile them... –  abigagli Nov 30 '08 at 16:01
    
abigagli: Seriously? Sweet! I will enforce this at work, first thing tomorrow ;) –  Magnus Hoff Nov 30 '08 at 22:31

In the second case, doing this is simpler:

Class::only_work_with_sp(foo &sp)
{    
    ...  
    sp.do_something();  
    ...  
}

You can call it as

only_work_with_sp(*sp);
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3  
If you adopt the convention to use object references when you don't need to take a copy of the pointer, it serves to document your intent as well. It also gives you a chance to use a const reference. –  Mark Ransom Nov 29 '08 at 16:36
    
Yes, I agree on the usage of references to objects as a mean to express that the called function is not "remembering" anything about that object. Usually I use pointer formal arguments if the function is "keeping track" of the object –  abigagli Nov 30 '08 at 15:57

I would avoid a "plain" reference unless the function explicitely may modify the pointer.

A const & may be a sensible micro-optimization when calling small functions - e.g. to enable further optimizations, like inlining away some conditions. Also, the increment/decrement - since it's thread safe - is a synchronization point. I would not expect this to make a big difference in most scenarios, though.

Generally, you should use the simpler style unless you have reason not to. Then, either use the const & consistently, or add a comment as to why if you use it just in a few places.

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I would advocate passing shared pointer by const reference - a semantics that the function being passed with the pointer does NOT own the pointer, which is a clean idiom for developers.

The only pitfall is in multiple thread programs the object being pointed by the shared pointer gets destroyed in another thread. So it is safe to say using const reference of shared pointer is safe in single threaded program.

Passing shared pointer by non-const reference is sometimes dangerous - the reason is the swap and reset functions the function may invoke inside so as to destroy the object which is still considered valid after the function returns.

It is not about premature optimization, I guess - it is about avoiding unnecessary waste of CPU cycles when you are clear what you want to do and the coding idiom has firmly been adopted by your fellow developers.

Just my 2 cents :-)

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1  
See the comment above by David Schwartz "...I chased down a very serious bug that was due to passing a reference to a shared pointer. The code was handling an object's state change and when it noticed the state of the object had changed, it removed it from the collection of objects in the previous state and moved it into the collection of objects in the new state. The remove operation destroyed the last shared pointer to the object. The member function had been called on a reference to the shared pointer in the collection. Boom..." –  Jason Harrison Sep 18 at 17:23

It seems that all the pros and cons here can actually be generalised to ANY type passed by reference not just shared_ptr. In my opinion, you should know the semantic of passing by reference, const reference and value and use it correctly. But there is absolutely nothing inherently wrong with passing shared_ptr by reference, unless you think that all references are bad...

To go back to the example:

Class::only_work_with_sp( foo &sp ) //Again, no copy here  
{    
    ...  
    sp.do_something();  
    ...  
}

How do you know that sp.do_something() will not blow up due to a dangling pointer?

The truth is that, shared_ptr or not, const or not, this could happen if you have a design flaw, like directly or indirectly sharing the ownership of sp between threads, missusing an object that do delete this, you have a circular ownership or other ownership errors.

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I'll assume that you are familiar with premature optimization and are asking this either for academic purposes or because you have isolated some pre-existing code that is under-performing.

Passing by reference is okay

Passing by const reference is better, and can usually be used, as it does not force const-ness on the object pointed to.

You are not at risk of losing the pointer due to using a reference. That reference is evidence that you have a copy of the smart pointer earlier in the stack and only one thread owns a call stack, so that pre-existing copy isn't going away.

Using references is often more efficient for the reasons you mention, but not guaranteed. Remember that dereferencing an object can take work too. Your ideal reference-usage scenario would be if your coding style involves many small functions, where the pointer would get passed from function to function to function before being used.

You should always avoid storing your smart pointer as a reference. Your Class::take_copy_of_sp(&sp) example shows correct usage for that.

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"You are not at risk of losing the pointer due to using a reference. That reference is evidence that you have a copy of the smart pointer earlier in the stack" Or a data member...? –  Daniel Earwicker Nov 30 '08 at 23:23
    
Consider the magic of boost::thread and boost::ref: boost::function<int> functionPointer = boost::bind(doSomething, boost::ref( sharedPtrInstance ) ); m_workerThread = new boost::thread( functionPointer ); ... delete sharedPtrInstance –  Jason Harrison Sep 18 at 17:26

Assuming we are not concerned with const correctness (or more, you mean to allow the functions to be able to modify or share ownership of the data being passed in), passing a boost::shared_ptr by value is safer than passing it by reference as we allow the original boost::shared_ptr to control it's own lifetime. Consider the results of the following code...

void FooTakesReference( boost::shared_ptr< int > & ptr )
{
    ptr.reset(); // We reset, and so does sharedA, memory is deleted.
}

void FooTakesValue( boost::shared_ptr< int > ptr )
{
    ptr.reset(); // Our temporary is reset, however sharedB hasn't.
}

void main()
{
    boost::shared_ptr< int > sharedA( new int( 13 ) );
    boost::shared_ptr< int > sharedB( new int( 14 ) );

    FooTakesReference( sharedA );

    FooTakesValue( sharedB );
}

From the example above we see that passing sharedA by reference allows FooTakesReference to reset the original pointer, which reduces it's use count to 0, destroying it's data. FooTakesValue, however, can't reset the original pointer, guaranteeing sharedB's data is still usable. When another developer inevitably comes along and attempts to piggyback on sharedA's fragile existence, chaos ensues. The lucky sharedB developer, however, goes home early as all is right in his world.

The code safety, in this case, far outweighs any speed improvement copying creates. At the same time, the boost::shared_ptr is meant to improve code safety. It will be far easier to go from a copy to a reference, if something requires this kind of niche optimization.

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Sandy wrote: "It seems that all the pros and cons here can actually be generalised to ANY type passed by reference not just shared_ptr."

True to some extent, but the point of using shared_ptr is to eliminate concerns regarding object lifetimes and to let the compiler handle that for you. If you're going to pass a shared pointer by reference and allow clients of your reference-counted-object call non-const methods that might free the object data, then using a shared pointer is almost pointless.

I wrote "almost" in that previous sentence because performance can be a concern, and it 'might' be justified in rare cases, but I would also avoid this scenario myself and look for all possible other optimization solutions myself, such as to seriously look at adding another level of indirection, lazy evaluation, etc..

Code that exists past it's author, or even post it's author's memory, that requires implicit assumptions about behavior, in particular behavior about object lifetimes, requires clear, concise, readable documentation, and then many clients won't read it anyway! Simplicity almost always trumps efficiency, and there are almost always other ways to be efficient. If you really need to pass values by reference to avoid deep copying by copy constructors of your reference-counted-objects (and the equals operator), then perhaps you should consider ways to make the deep-copied data be reference counted pointers that can be copied quickly. (Of course, that's just one design scenario that might not apply to your situation).

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I used to work in a project that the principle was very strong about passing smart pointers by value. When I was asked to do some performance analysis - I found that for increment and decrement of the reference counters of the smart pointers the application spends between 4-6% of the utilized processor time.

If you want to pass the smart pointers by value just to avoid having issues in weird cases as described from Daniel Earwicker make sure you understand the price you paying for it.

If you decide to go with a reference the main reason to use const reference is to make it possible to have implicit upcasting when you need to pass shared pointer to object from class that inherits the class you use in the interface.

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One thing that I haven't seen mentioned yet is that when you pass shared pointers by reference, you lose the implicit conversion that you get if you want to pass a derived class shared pointer through a reference to a base class shared pointer.

For example, this code will produce an error, but it will work if you change test() so that the shared pointer is not passed by reference.

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

class Base { };
class Derived: public Base { };

// ONLY instances of Base can be passed by reference.  If you have a shared_ptr
// to a derived type, you have to cast it manually.  If you remove the reference
// and pass the shared_ptr by value, then the cast is implicit so you don't have
// to worry about it.
void test(boost::shared_ptr<Base>& b)
{
    return;
}

int main(void)
{
    boost::shared_ptr<Derived> d(new Derived);
    test(d);

    // If you want the above call to work with references, you will have to manually cast
    // pointers like this, EVERY time you call the function.  Since you are creating a new
    // shared pointer, you lose the benefit of passing by reference.
    boost::shared_ptr<Base> b = boost::dynamic_pointer_cast<Base>(d);
    test(b);

    return 0;
}
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In addition to what litb said, I'd like to point out that it's probably to pass by const reference in the second example, that way you are sure you don't accidentally modify it.

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struct A {
  shared_ptr<Message> msg;
  shared_ptr<Message> * ptr_msg;
}
  1. pass by value:

    void set(shared_ptr<Message> msg) {
      this->msg = msg; /// create a new shared_ptr, reference count will be added;
    } /// out of method, new created shared_ptr will be deleted, of course, reference count also be reduced;
    
  2. pass by reference:

    void set(shared_ptr<Message>& msg) {
     this->msg = msg; /// reference count will be added, because reference is just an alias.
     }
    
  3. pass by pointer:

    void set(shared_ptr<Message>* msg) {
      this->ptr_msg = msg; /// reference count will not be added;
    }
    
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