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for my web application, i would like the main div to be full screen (both width and height = 100%), and regardless of content, i want it to stay at that size. that means, if there are not much content, it shouldn't shrink, and if there are too much content, it shouldn't push this main div.

how can i do this?

(i'm ok with hacks applied to this div, as long as it will keep contents hack-free)

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6 Answers 6

Or even just:

<div id="full-size">
  Your contents go here
</div>
html,body{ margin:0; padding:0; height:100%; width:100%; }
#full-size{
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
  overflow:hidden; /* or overflow:auto; if you want scrollbars */
}

(html, body can be set to like.. 95%-99% or some such to account for slight inconsistencies in margins, etc.)

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hey this working fine me :) –  Suresh Pattu Aug 2 '12 at 12:30
    
This does not for me. (firefox) –  Tomáš Zato Jan 15 at 19:18

Notice how most of these can only be used WITHOUT a DOCTYPE. I'm looking for the same answer, but I have a DOCTYPE. There is one way to do it with a DOCTYPE however, although it doesn't apply to the style of my site, but it will work on the type of page you want to create:

div#full-size{
    position: absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    right:0;
    left:0;
    overflow:hidden;

Now, this was mentioned earlier but I just wanted to clarify that this is normally used with a DOCTYPE, height:100%; only works without a DOCTYPE

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<html>
<div style="width:100%; height:100%; position:fixed; left:0;top:0;overflow:hidden;">

</div>
</html>
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#fullDiv {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: fixed;
}

Tested on putlocker: http://stylebot.me/styles/4035

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#fullDiv {
  position: absolute;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  overflow: hidden; /* or auto or scroll */
}
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The right:0 and bottom:0 descriptors are unnecessary; they will override the top and left descriptors. This used to get me all the time; CSS isn't like Windows Forms or XAML in this respect. –  mattbasta Jul 18 '10 at 18:03
    
@mattbasta: Better check your work again then. I use this in FF 3.6, Safari and IE and it works great in all three. It's how I make a transparent "shield window" for modal popin dialogs. –  Robusto Jul 18 '10 at 23:39
    
@mattbasta: Oh, and forgot to mention Chrome and Opera. –  Robusto Jul 19 '10 at 0:25
    
It may work, but those descriptors are unnecessary if you set the width and height properly –  mattbasta Jul 19 '10 at 2:26
    
@mattbasta: You stated that the right:0 and bottom:0 descriptors will override top and left. That is incorrect. What will not work is the 100% width and 100% height, esp. if you have borders and/or padding (and cross-browser implementations). What I have shown has been what I have been relying on for years without a problem, and the only way I have found to guarantee that the styling objective will be achieved in all cases. –  Robusto Jul 19 '10 at 2:42

Use the HTML

<div id="full-size">
    <div id="wrapper">
        Your content goes here.
    </div>
</div>

and use the CSS:

html, body {margin:0;padding:0;height:100%;}
#full-size {
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    overflow:hidden;
}
#wrapper {
    /*You can add padding and margins here.*/
    padding:0;
    margin:0;
}

Make sure that the HTML is in the root element.

Hope this helps!

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You will need some javascript to make maximize the browser window. –  Byron Whitlock Jul 18 '10 at 16:10
    
thanks, this works ok, except one problem: - if an element is pushing wrapper (because it has 100% height), wrapper's height exceeds screen, results in overflow. if i remove 100% height from element, then it doesn't fill wrapper. –  throwaway007 Jul 18 '10 at 16:21
    
@throwaway007: I've updated the code. Check it out now! –  mattbasta Jul 18 '10 at 16:34
    
@Byron: That's untrue. JS is entirely unnecessary for this. The only browser that might now work 100% is IE6, and that would be a case-by-case thing. –  mattbasta Jul 18 '10 at 16:35

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