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What's difference between cache & permanently cache in browser. In GWT framework image files rename to .cache. pattern and I read somewhere in google website to cache permanently images in GWT configure the App-Server for caching them permanently. But I don't know how to do this exactly. My website's images will never changed and I want to cache them forever without any version checking (for best performance) Yours sincerely

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ClientBundle introduced in GWT 2.0 allows you to bundle images and other resources in one file, this file is cached forever resulting in fewer server request.

That being said, GWT introduces a concept they call perfect caching. It works by splitting your application in several files named something like .cache.html and the md5 part always change when your application code or resources change. Then there's the bootstrap script, which contains the logic to look for the correct <md5>.cache.html file and load it. The bootstrap should never be cached.

In your app server, you need to configure it something like this (Apache in this case)

<Files *.nocache.*>
  ExpiresDefault "access"
</Files>

<Files *.cache.*>
        ExpiresDefault "now plus 1 year"
</Files>

In this case it's set to cache for one year. As far as I know there's no setting to cache forever, that only means a very high expiration time.

Tomcat caching

In the case of Tomcat, as far as I know there's no cache control so it has to be done manually by setting the proper HTTP headers. This can be automated by the use of filters.

/*Please don't use this in production!*/
public class CacheFilter implements Filter {

    public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain)
        throws IOException, ServletException {
        HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
        HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;

        //cache everything for one year
        response.addHeader("Cache-Control", "max-age=31556926");
        chain.doFilter(request, response);
    }

    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) {
        this.fc = filterConfig;
    }

    public void destroy() {
        this.fc = null;
    }
}

Then map the filter in tomcat or derivatives (such as glassfish), in web.xml:

<filter>
    <filter-name>cachingFilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>CacheFilter</filter-class>
</filter>

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>cachingFilter</filter-name> 
    <url-pattern>*.cache.*</url-pattern>  
</filter-mapping>
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would you please explain me how to configure in Glassfish –  Nav Jul 19 '10 at 6:29
    
I'm not sure, but it seems Glassfish uses a Tomcat derivative for its HTTP/Servlet container. In that case I think you need to create a filter and add a Cache-Control HTTP header for .nocache. and .cache. files. –  Cesar Jul 20 '10 at 1:33
    
But i thought when we use ImageBundle in GWT we don't need to consider for permanently caching, because when our images binds together in a larger single image, it means, these images should be cached, so why we must create filters and configure App-Server ?! –  Nav Jul 20 '10 at 18:22
    
It's true that when you use ImageBundle, GWT binds together all images into a single larger one. However depending on your server setup that single image will or will not be cached. The main benefit of ClientBundle is the single download (improving performance) vs multiple smaller downloads, not cache control. Your cache settings still have to be correctly configured. –  Cesar Jul 20 '10 at 18:41
    
thanks for your answer –  Nav Jul 21 '10 at 8:10

Caching is controlled by HTTP headers. You must send the appropriate headers if you want to browsers to cache images etc. ImageBundle just bundles the images together, creating sprites in order to minimize the HTTP requests.

GWT just marks which files should be cached (.cache.) and which not (.nocache.). It's your servers responsibility to set the appropriate HTTP headers (and actually yours to configure your servers correctly!).

Google has an explanation of "Perfect Caching" at the end of this article: http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/doc/latest/DevGuideCompilingAndDebugging.html

Also there is a good (general) article about HTTP caching headers and browser / proxy compatibility here: https://code.google.com/p/doctype-mirror/wiki/ArticleHttpCaching

Glassfish

You need to implement a filter and configure it in web.xml for Glassfish.

I won't go into much detail in this answer but have a look at this blog post: http://blogs.oracle.com/cwebster/entry/caching_static_resources_in_glassfish

It has a link for a filter class at the end.

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But i thought when we use ImageBundle in GWT we don't need to consider for permanently caching, because when our images binds together in a larger single image, it means, these images should be cached, so why we must create filters and configure App-Server ?! –  Nav Jul 20 '10 at 18:23
    
Updated my answer but just also saw that @Cesar has responded as well. –  fotos Jul 21 '10 at 12:10

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