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I'm pretty much new in Python object oriented programming and I have trouble understanding the super() function (new style classes) especially when it comes to multiple inheritance.

For example if you have something like:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Third, self).__init__()
        print "that's it"

What I don't get is: will the Third() class inherit both constructor methods? If yes, then which one will be run with super() and why?

And what if you want to run the other one? I know it has something to do with Python method resolution order (MRO).

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6 Answers 6

up vote 148 down vote accepted

This is detailed with a reasonable amount of detail by Guido himself at http://python-history.blogspot.com/2010/06/method-resolution-order.html (including two earlier attempts).

But, briefly: in your example, Third() will call First.__init__. For such simple situations, Python will look for the attribute (in this case, __init__) on the class's parents, left to right. So, if you define

class Third(First, Second):
    ...

Python will look at First, and, if First doesn't have the attribute, at Second.

This situation becomes more complex when inheritance starts crossing paths (say, if First inherited from Second, for instance). Read the link above for more details, but, in a nutshell, Python will try to maintain the order in which each class appears on the inheritance list, child classes first.

So, for instance, if you had:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "third"

class Fourth(Second, Third):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Fourth, self).__init__()
        print "that's it"

the MRO would be [Fourth, Second, Third, First].

By the way: if Python cannot find a coherent method resolution order, it'll raise an exception, instead of falling back to a behaviour which might surprise the user.

Edited to add example of an ambiguous MRO:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
    def __init__(self):
        print "third"

Should Third's MRO be [First, Second] or [Second, First]? There's no obvious expectation, and Python will raise an error:

TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases Cannot create a consistent method resolution order (MRO) for bases Second, First

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Hey thanks that's pretty much what I needed. –  Callisto Jul 19 '10 at 8:15
    
Cool, that's good to know :) –  rbp Jul 19 '10 at 15:48
1  
Of course, I've edited the answer to give a simple example. –  rbp Aug 2 '10 at 15:18
1  
It becomes more interesting (and, arguably, more confusing) when you start calling super() in First, Second, and Third [ pastebin.com/ezTyZ5Wa ]. –  gatoatigrado Jul 10 '12 at 0:37
1  
I think the lack of super calls in the first classes is a really big problem with this answer; without discussing how/why thats important critical understanding to the question is lost. –  Sam Hartman Dec 7 '13 at 20:14

Your code, and the other answers, are all buggy. They are missing the super() calls in the first two classes that are required for co-operative subclassing to work.

Here is a fixed version of the code:

class First(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(First, self).__init__()
    print "first"

class Second(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Second, self).__init__()
    print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Third, self).__init__()
    print "that's it"

The super() call finds the /next method/ in the MRO at each step, which is why First and Second have to have it too, otherwise execution stops at the end of Second.__init__.

This is what I get:

>>> Third()
second
first
that's it
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1  
What to do if these classes need different parameters to initialize themselves? –  calfzhou May 8 at 9:23

This is known as the Diamond Problem, the page has an entry on Python, but in short, Python will call the superclass's methods from left to right.

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This is not the Diamond Problem. The Diamond Problem involves four classes and the OP's question only involves three. –  stair314 Aug 6 '11 at 16:14
31  
object is the fourth –  GP89 Oct 26 '11 at 13:30

I understand this doesn't directly answer the super() question, but I feel it's relevant enough to share.

There is also a way to directly call each inherited class:


class First(object):
 def __init__(self):
  print '1'

class Second(object):
 def __init__(self):
  print '2'

class Third(First, Second):
 def __init__(self):
  Second.__init__(self)

Just note that if you do it this way, you'll have to call each manually as I'm pretty sure First's __init__() won't be called.

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It won't be called because you did not call each inherited class. The problem is rather that if First and Second are both inheriting another class and calling it directly then this common class (starting point of the diamond) is called twice. super is avoiding this. –  Trilarion 23 hours ago

Also check out:

http://docs.python.org/release/1.5.1p1/tut/multiple.html

and

http://www.cafepy.com/article/python_attributes_and_methods/python_attributes_and_methods.html#computing-the-mro

for additional information

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5  
1.5.1p1 contained only old-style classes, and thus should not be read by anyone anymore ;) –  Antti Haapala Apr 3 '12 at 12:09

Another not yet covered point is passing parameters for initialization of classes. Since the destination of super depends on the subclass the only good way to pass parameters is packing them all together. Then be careful to not have the same parameter name with different meanings.

Example:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('A.__init__')
        super().__init__()

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('B.__init__ {}'.format(kwargs['x']))
        super().__init__(**kwargs)


class C(A):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('C.__init__ with {}, {}'.format(kwargs['a'], kwargs['b']))
        super().__init__(**kwargs)


class D(B, C): # MRO=D, B, C, A
    def __init__(self):
        print('D.__init__')
        super().__init__(a=1, b=2, x=3)

print(D.mro())
D()

gives:

[<class '__main__.D'>, <class '__main__.B'>, <class '__main__.C'>, <class '__main__.A'>, <class 'object'>]
D.__init__
B.__init__ 3
C.__init__ with 1, 2
A.__init__

Calling the super class __init__ directly to more direct assignment of parameters is tempting but fails if there is any super call in a super class and/or the MRO is changed and class A may be called multiple times, depending on the implementation.

To conclude: cooperative inheritance and super and specific parameters for initialization aren't working together very well.

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