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I'm pretty much new in Python object oriented programming and I have trouble understanding the super() function (new style classes) especially when it comes to multiple inheritance.

For example if you have something like:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Third, self).__init__()
        print "that's it"

What I don't get is: will the Third() class inherit both constructor methods? If yes, then which one will be run with super() and why?

And what if you want to run the other one? I know it has something to do with Python method resolution order (MRO).

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7 Answers 7

up vote 218 down vote accepted

This is detailed with a reasonable amount of detail by Guido himself at http://python-history.blogspot.com/2010/06/method-resolution-order.html (including two earlier attempts).

But, briefly: in your example, Third() will call First.__init__. For such simple situations, Python will look for the attribute (in this case, __init__) on the class's parents, left to right. So, if you define

class Third(First, Second):
    ...

Python will look at First, and, if First doesn't have the attribute, at Second.

This situation becomes more complex when inheritance starts crossing paths (say, if First inherited from Second, for instance). Read the link above for more details, but, in a nutshell, Python will try to maintain the order in which each class appears on the inheritance list, child classes first.

So, for instance, if you had:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "third"

class Fourth(Second, Third):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Fourth, self).__init__()
        print "that's it"

the MRO would be [Fourth, Second, Third, First].

By the way: if Python cannot find a coherent method resolution order, it'll raise an exception, instead of falling back to a behaviour which might surprise the user.

Edited to add example of an ambiguous MRO:

class First(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "first"

class Second(First):
    def __init__(self):
        print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
    def __init__(self):
        print "third"

Should Third's MRO be [First, Second] or [Second, First]? There's no obvious expectation, and Python will raise an error:

TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases Cannot create a consistent method resolution order (MRO) for bases Second, First

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks that's pretty much what I needed. –  Callisto Jul 19 '10 at 8:15
    
Cool, that's good to know :) –  rbp Jul 19 '10 at 15:48
1  
Of course, I've edited the answer to give a simple example. –  rbp Aug 2 '10 at 15:18
1  
It becomes more interesting (and, arguably, more confusing) when you start calling super() in First, Second, and Third [ pastebin.com/ezTyZ5Wa ]. –  gatoatigrado Jul 10 '12 at 0:37
3  
I think the lack of super calls in the first classes is a really big problem with this answer; without discussing how/why thats important critical understanding to the question is lost. –  Sam Hartman Dec 7 '13 at 20:14

Your code, and the other answers, are all buggy. They are missing the super() calls in the first two classes that are required for co-operative subclassing to work.

Here is a fixed version of the code:

class First(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(First, self).__init__()
    print "first"

class Second(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Second, self).__init__()
    print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Third, self).__init__()
    print "that's it"

The super() call finds the /next method/ in the MRO at each step, which is why First and Second have to have it too, otherwise execution stops at the end of Second.__init__.

This is what I get:

>>> Third()
second
first
that's it
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12  
What to do if these classes need different parameters to initialize themselves? –  calfzhou May 8 '14 at 9:23
    
@calfzhou I'm answering this below, b/c I had the same question –  brent.payne Aug 17 '14 at 18:30
1  
"co-operative subclassing" –  Quant Metropolis Sep 5 '14 at 11:13
1  
In this way the init methods of BOTH base classes will get executed, while the original example calls only the first init encountered in the MRO. I guess that is implied by the term "co-operative subclassing", but a clarification would have been useful ('Explicit is better than implicit', you know ;) ) –  Quant Metropolis Sep 5 '14 at 11:19
    
Yes, if you are passing different parameters to a method being called via super, all the implementations of that method going up the MRO towards object() need to have compatible signatures. This can be achieved through keyword parameters: accept more parameters than the method uses, and ignore extra ones. Its generally considered ugly to do this, and for most cases adding new methods is better, but init is (nearly?) unique as a special method name but with user defined parameters. –  lifeless Dec 1 '14 at 10:15

This is known as the Diamond Problem, the page has an entry on Python, but in short, Python will call the superclass's methods from left to right.

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This is not the Diamond Problem. The Diamond Problem involves four classes and the OP's question only involves three. –  stair314 Aug 6 '11 at 16:14
52  
object is the fourth –  GP89 Oct 26 '11 at 13:30

This is to how I solved to issue of having multiple inheritance with different variables for initialization and having multiple MixIns with the same function call. I had to explicitly add variables to passed **kwargs and add a MixIn interface to be an endpoint for super calls.

Here A is an extendable base class and B and C are MixIn classes both who provide function f. A and B both expect parameter v in their __init__ and C expects w. The function f takes one parameter y. Q inherits from all three classes. MixInF is the mixin interface for B and C.


class A(object):
    def __init__(self, v, *args, **kwargs):
        print "A:init:v[{0}]".format(v)
        kwargs['v']=v
        super(A, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.v = v


class MixInF(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "IObject:init"
    def f(self, y):
        print "IObject:y[{0}]".format(y)


class B(MixInF):
    def __init__(self, v, *args, **kwargs):
        print "B:init:v[{0}]".format(v)
        kwargs['v']=v
        super(B, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.v = v
    def f(self, y):
        print "B:f:v[{0}]:y[{1}]".format(self.v, y)
        super(B, self).f(y)


class C(MixInF):
    def __init__(self, w, *args, **kwargs):
        print "C:init:w[{0}]".format(w)
        kwargs['w']=w
        super(C, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.w = w
    def f(self, y):
        print "C:f:w[{0}]:y[{1}]".format(self.w, y)
        super(C, self).f(y)


class Q(C,B,A):
    def __init__(self, v, w):
        super(Q, self).__init__(v=v, w=w)
    def f(self, y):
        print "Q:f:y[{0}]".format(y)
        super(Q, self).f(y)
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I think this should perhaps be a separate question-and-answer, as the MRO is a large enough topic on its own without getting into dealing with varying arguments across functions with inheritance (multiple inheritance is a special case of that). –  lifeless Dec 1 '14 at 10:21
1  
Theoretically, yes. Practically, this scenario has come up every time I've encountered Diamond inheritance in python, so I added it here. Since, this is where I go every time I cannot cleanly avoid diamond inheritance. Here are some extra links for future me: rhettinger.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/super-considered-super code.activestate.com/recipes/… –  brent.payne Dec 3 '14 at 20:40

I understand this doesn't directly answer the super() question, but I feel it's relevant enough to share.

There is also a way to directly call each inherited class:


class First(object):
 def __init__(self):
  print '1'

class Second(object):
 def __init__(self):
  print '2'

class Third(First, Second):
 def __init__(self):
  Second.__init__(self)

Just note that if you do it this way, you'll have to call each manually as I'm pretty sure First's __init__() won't be called.

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1  
It won't be called because you did not call each inherited class. The problem is rather that if First and Second are both inheriting another class and calling it directly then this common class (starting point of the diamond) is called twice. super is avoiding this. –  Trilarion Jul 29 '14 at 12:04
    
@Trilarion Yea, I was confident it wouldn't. However, I didn't definitively know and I didn't want to state as if I did even though it was very unlikely. That's a good point about the object being called twice. I didn't think about that. I just wanted to make the point that you call parent classes directly. –  Seaux Jul 30 '14 at 18:58

Another not yet covered point is passing parameters for initialization of classes. Since the destination of super depends on the subclass the only good way to pass parameters is packing them all together. Then be careful to not have the same parameter name with different meanings.

Example:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('A.__init__')
        super().__init__()

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('B.__init__ {}'.format(kwargs['x']))
        super().__init__(**kwargs)


class C(A):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        print('C.__init__ with {}, {}'.format(kwargs['a'], kwargs['b']))
        super().__init__(**kwargs)


class D(B, C): # MRO=D, B, C, A
    def __init__(self):
        print('D.__init__')
        super().__init__(a=1, b=2, x=3)

print(D.mro())
D()

gives:

[<class '__main__.D'>, <class '__main__.B'>, <class '__main__.C'>, <class '__main__.A'>, <class 'object'>]
D.__init__
B.__init__ 3
C.__init__ with 1, 2
A.__init__

Calling the super class __init__ directly to more direct assignment of parameters is tempting but fails if there is any super call in a super class and/or the MRO is changed and class A may be called multiple times, depending on the implementation.

To conclude: cooperative inheritance and super and specific parameters for initialization aren't working together very well.

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I wanted to elaborate the answer by lifeless a bit because when I started reading about how to use super() in a multiple inheritance hierarchy in Python, I did't get it immediately.

What you need to understand is that super(MyClass, self).__init__() provides the next __init__ method according to the used Method Resolution Ordering (MRO) algorithm in the context of the complete inheritance hierarchy.

This last part is crucial to understand. Let's consider the example again:

class First(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(First, self).__init__()
    print "first"

class Second(object):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Second, self).__init__()
    print "second"

class Third(First, Second):
  def __init__(self):
    super(Third, self).__init__()
    print "that's it"

According to this article about Method Resolution Order by Guido van Rossum, the order to resolve __init__ is calculated (before Python 2.3) using a "depth-first left-to-right traversal" :

Third --> First --> object --> Second --> object

After removing all duplicates, except for the last one, we get :

Third --> First --> Second --> object

So, lets follow what happens when we instantiate an instance of the Third class, e.g. x = Third().

  1. According to MRO __init__ of Third is called first.

  2. Next, according to the MRO, inside the __init__ method super(Third, self).__init__() resolves to the __init__ method of First, which gets called.

  3. Inside __init__ of First super(First, self).__init__() calls the __init__ of Second, because that is what the MRO dictates!

  4. Inside __init__ of Second super(Second, self).__init__() calls the __init__ of object, which amounts to nothing. After that "second" is printed.

  5. After super(First, self).__init__() completed, "first" is printed.

  6. After super(Third, self).__init__() completed, "that's it" is printed.

This details out why instantiating Third() results in to :

>>> x = Third()
second
first
that's it

The MRO algorithm has been improved from Python 2.3 onwards to work well in complex cases, but I guess that using the "depth-first left-to-right traversal" + "removing duplicates expect for the last" still works in most cases (please comment if this is not the case). Be sure to read the blog post by Guido!

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