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Other than perhaps enhanced readability for very simple patterns, why would someone choose to use the Like operator in VB.NET over regular expressions for string pattern matching? Are there any advantages?

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Keep in mind Like can be redefined to do custom comparisons on classes and structs. In your question, do you mean specifically using Like for string comparison? –  R0MANARMY Jul 19 '10 at 3:42
    
Yes, for string comparisons. I'm unfamiliar with the alternate usage you mention. Any examples? –  mattmc3 Jul 19 '10 at 3:44
    
Since Like is a first-class operator, you can override it in your class definitions, which is what he's getting at. –  Marc Bollinger Jul 19 '10 at 3:49
    
See section called Overloading. –  R0MANARMY Jul 19 '10 at 3:49
    
Oh, that's just too weird. I'm usually a defender of operator overloading when appropriate, but that might just be enough to sway me the other way. –  mattmc3 Jul 19 '10 at 3:58

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Probably. If you want to take a look at how Like is implemented, much (all?) of it is in Microsoft.VisualBasic.CompilerServices.LikeOperator, and the rudiments can be seen in #LikeObject and #LikeString. Looking at the documentation, Like obviously uses a pretty strict subset of the full-on regular expression engine, and like just about any Perl-Compatible Regular Expression engine, there's some heavy lifting that may be overkill for simple expressions.

That said, in my opinion, it comes down to style. If you feel that If (myString Like "a?bb") is more readable, idiomatic, and consistent with the rest of your code, go for it. It would appear to me that going either way for anything but the aforementioned reasons is microoptimization theatre, especially since you can compile regexes if you need to.

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