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As I know that C++ compiler creates a copy constructor for each class. In which cases we have to write user defined copy constructors? Can you give some examples?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

The copy constructor generated by the compiler does member-wise copying. Sometimes that is not sufficient. For example:

class Class {
public:
    Class( const char* str );
    ~Class();
private:
    char* stored;
};

Class::Class( const char* str )
{
    stored = new char[srtlen( str ) + 1 ];
    strcpy( stored, str );
}

Class::~Class()
{
    delete[] stored;
}

in this case member-wise copying of stored member will not duplicate the buffer (only the pointer will be copied), so the first to be destroyed copy sharing the buffer will call delete[] successfully and the second will run into undefined behavior. You need deep copying copy constructor (and assignment operator as well).

Class::Class( const Class& another )
{
    stored = new char[strlen(another.stored) + 1];
    strcpy( stored, another.stored );
}

void Class::operator = ( const Class& another )
{
    char* temp = new char[strlen(another.stored) + 1];
    strcpy( temp, another.stored);
    delete[] stored;
    stored = temp;
}
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7  
It doesn't perform bit-wise, but member-wise copy which in particular invokes the copy-ctor for class-type members. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 19 '10 at 5:26
    
@Georg Fritzsche: Thank you, fixed. –  sharptooth Jul 19 '10 at 5:28
6  
Dont write the assingment operator like that. Its not exception safe. (if the new throws an exception the object is left in an undefined state with store pointing at a deallocated part of memory (deallocate the memory ONLY after all operations that can throw have completed succesfully)). A simple solution is to use the copy swap idium. –  Loki Astari Jul 19 '10 at 5:31
4  
I know it's just an example, but you should point out the better solution is to use std::string. The general idea is that only utility classes that manage resources need to overload the Big Three, and that all other classes should just use those utility classes, removing the need to define any of the Big Three. –  GManNickG Jul 19 '10 at 5:37
2  
@Martin: I wanted to make sure it was carved in stone. :P –  GManNickG Jul 19 '10 at 6:04

I am a bit peeved that the rule of the Big Three wasn't cited.

This rule is very simple:

The Big Three:
Whenever you are writing either one of Destructor, Copy Constructor or Copy Assignment Operator, you probably need to write the other two.

But there is a more general guideline that you should follow, which derives from the need to write exception-safe code:

Each resource should be managed by a dedicated object

Here sharptooth's code is still (mostly) fine, however if he were to add a second attribute to his class it would not be. Consider the following class:

class Erroneous
{
public:
  Erroneous();
  // ... others
private:
  Foo* mFoo;
  Bar* mBar;
};

Erroneous::Erroneous(): mFoo(new Foo()), mBar(new Bar()) {}

What happens if new Bar throws ? How do you delete the object pointed to by mFoo ? There are solutions (function level try/catch ...), they just don't scale.

The proper way to deal with the situation is to use proper classes instead of raw pointers.

class Righteous
{
public:
private:
  std::unique_ptr<Foo> mFoo;
  std::unique_ptr<Bar> mBar;
};

With the same constructor implementation (yes, the same), I now have exception safety for free!!! Isn't it exciting ? And best of all, I no longer need to worry about a proper destructor! I do need to write my own Copy Constructor and Assignment Operator though, because unique_ptr does not define these operations... but it doesn't matter here ;)

And therefore, sharptooth's class revisited:

class Class
{
public:
  Class(char const* str): mData(str) {}
private:
  std::string mData;
};

I don't know about you, but I find mine easier ;)

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+1 for big three. –  penguru Apr 4 '12 at 8:42

If you have a class that has dynamically allocated content. For example you store the title of a book as a char * and set the title with new, copy will not work.

You would have to write a copy constructor that does title = new char[length+1] and then strcpy(title, titleIn). The copy constructor would just do a "shallow" copy.

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Copy Constructor is called when an object is either passed by value, returned by value, or explicitly copied. If there is no copy constructor, c++ creates a default copy constructor which makes a shallow copy. If the object has no pointers to dynamically allocated memory then shallow copy will do.

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It's often a good idea to disable copy ctor, and operator= unless the class specifically needs it. This may prevent inefficiencies such as passing an arg by value when reference is intended. Also the compiler generated methods may be invalid.

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