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How can I rotate a 2D rectangular array of integers that has odd number of rows by 45 degrees?

So something like

int[] myArray = new int[,]   
{  
    {1, 0 ,1},  
    {0, 1 ,0},  
    {0, 0 ,0},  
} 

into

int[] rotatedArray = new int[,]   
{  
    {0, 1 ,0},  
    {0, 1 ,1},  
    {0, 0 ,0},  
}  

for any dimension (3x3, 5x5, 7x7, etc.). By this formula http://yfrog.com/n6matrix45p

5x5

0 0 0 0 0  
2 0 0 0 0  
1 1 1 1 1  
0 0 0 0 0  
0 0 0 0 0 

into

1 2 0 0 0  
0 1 0 0 0  
0 0 1 0 0  
0 0 0 1 0  
0 0 0 0 1 

5x5

0 0 0 3 0  
0 0 0 3 0  
0 0 0 3 0  
0 0 0 3 0  
0 0 0 3 0 

into

0 0 0 0 0  
0 0 0 0 3  
0 0 0 3 0  
0 0 3 3 0  
0 3 0 0 0  
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a code written by me and a friend that solves this:

public static class ArrayExtensions
{
    public static Point RoundIndexToPoint(int index, int radius)
    {
        if (radius == 0)
            return new Point(0, 0);
        Point result = new Point(-radius, -radius);

        while (index < 0) index += radius * 8;
        index = index % (radius * 8);

        int edgeLen = radius * 2;

        if (index < edgeLen)
        {
            result.X += index;
        }
        else if ((index -= edgeLen) < edgeLen)
        {
            result.X = radius;
            result.Y += index;
        }
        else if ((index -= edgeLen) < edgeLen)
        {
            result.X = radius - index;
            result.Y = radius;
        }
        else if ((index -= edgeLen) < edgeLen)
        {
            result.Y = radius - index;
        }

        return result;
    }

    public static T[,] Rotate45<T>(this T[,] array)
    {
        int dim = Math.Max(array.GetLength(0), array.GetLength(0));

        T[,] result = new T[dim, dim];

        Point center = new Point((result.GetLength(0) - 1) / 2, (result.GetLength(1) - 1) / 2);
        Point center2 = new Point((array.GetLength(0) - 1) / 2, (array.GetLength(1) - 1) / 2);
        for (int r = 0; r <= (dim - 1) / 2; r++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i <= r * 8; i++)
            {
                Point source = RoundIndexToPoint(i, r);
                Point target = RoundIndexToPoint(i + r, r);

                if (!(center2.X + source.X < 0 || center2.Y + source.Y < 0 || center2.X + source.X >= array.GetLength(0) || center2.Y + source.Y >= array.GetLength(1)))
                    result[center.X + target.X, center.Y + target.Y] = array[center2.X + source.X, center2.Y + source.Y];
            }
        }
        return result;
    }     
}

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You can try this library:

Math.NET Project for matrices operations... http://numerics.mathdotnet.com/

This code appears to be useful too:

http://www.drunkenhyena.com/cgi-bin/view_net_article.pl?chapter=2;article=28#Rotation

Don't forget the DirectX managed and unmanaged namespaces and classes. Lots and lots of good stuff there to check.

For example:

Matrix..::.Rotate Method (Single, MatrixOrder)

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those matrices are only 4x4 or 3x3, i'll try math.net, but i fear this rotation is too specific –  Kikaimaru Jul 19 '10 at 7:59
4  
These are rotation matrices for transformations. A completely different thing. –  Cloudanger Jul 19 '10 at 8:52
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I think we have these rules:

  1. Imagine the matrix as a set of "frames or boxes without centers" within each other like "Russian dolls".

  2. Elements at the center of a side (top/left/right/bottom) move towards the nearest corner clockwise.

  3. Corners move towards the next center clockwise.

  4. Elements that are not corners nor centers move to the next spot (clockwise) that is the same distance from a corner as they currently are.

I've started writing some code but I don't think it's trivial and I haven't had time to test.

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