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Some background, I'm trying to do a large scale building simulation.

The issue is I have a list of the the custom type Point3D that I want to do fast array multiplication on it. So, at different time step, I would have to times a double value with the Point3D ( I've overloaded the multiplication and division operation of Point3D) for each and every Point3D, the result will then be stored in a Dictionary<double,List<Point3D>>. The key of this dictionary is the different time step, and the value is the corresponding displacement.

Since I have a lot of DOF, and a lot of time step, it seems that the above operation is very slow. Is there anyway to optimize the whole operation?

This is my current code, and it's extremely slow. So I need some ideas to optimize it.

public static Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>> ComputeTimeSeries(Dictionary<double, double> timeStep, List<Point3D> dofs)
{
   var timeSeries = new Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>>();
   foreach(var keyValue in timeStep)
   {
      // the point3d*double operation is already being overloaded.
      timeSeries.Add(keyValue.Key, dofs.Select(pt=>pt*keyValue.Value).ToList());  
   }
   return timeSeries;
}

Note: I'm currently still stuck at .Net 3.5. So probably PLINQ and TPL won't help

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the timestep value? Is it some form of sample time? Does the interval between timesteps differ? Just wondering if the use of a Dictionary type is a must? –  ChrisBD Jul 19 '10 at 9:59
    
The timestep value is a form of sampled time, with regular increase in between the values. The interval between timesteps are the same. And no, using of dictionary is not necessary. But is using dictionary a problem? –  Graviton Jul 19 '10 at 10:02
    
If you do not need fast access by key, then of course Array or simple list will be preferable. –  Denis Palnitsky Jul 19 '10 at 10:06
    
Isn't the underlying question here: how can we efficiently do a bunch of multiplication in C#? If so, should we be looking at matrix algebra libraries? –  Yellowfog Jul 19 '10 at 11:21
    
The use of dictionary types is complicating the issue. If the interval between samples is fixed then it would be quicker to store the data samples within arrays and use matrix arithmetic. –  ChrisBD Jul 19 '10 at 12:22

5 Answers 5

I would try something like this:

public static Dictionary<double, Point3D[]> ComputeTimeSeries(Dictionary<double,    double> timeStep, Point3D[] dofs)
{
   var timeSeries = new Dictionary<double, Point3D[]>();
   foreach(var keyValue in timeStep)
   {
      var tempArray = new Point3D[dofs.Length];
      for (int index=0; index < dofs.Length; index++)
          tempArray[index] = dofs[index] * keyValue.Value;
      timeSeries.Add(keyValue.Key, tempArray);  
   }
   return timeSeries;
}

Using Select/ToList is more readable, but the extra interface calls are very expensive compared to a simple multiplication.

share|improve this answer
    
@nikie: One optimization would be to declare tempArray outside of the foreach loop to avoid the risk of multiple allocations. I don't think the extra allocations will be optimized out. –  Brian Jul 20 '10 at 14:51
    
@Brian: I don't get it. If I allocate only one instance, how would the dictionary contain more than one different version of the data afterwards? –  nikie Jul 20 '10 at 18:48
    
Oh, you're right. I'm an idiot. –  Brian Jul 20 '10 at 19:22

For starters, you can eliminate some re-allocation and copying by using a Capacity parameter when creating the new Dictionary:

 var timeSeries = new Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>>(timeStep.Count);

And the code in the foreach loop looks independent of each other, this means you could run it in parallel. In .NET4 this is as easy as replacing :

 foreach(var keyValue in timeStep) { ... }

with

Parallel.Foreach(timestep, key, (key) => ...);
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I'm still stuck at .net 3.5 –  Graviton Jul 19 '10 at 9:57
    
@Ngu: but do use the Capacity. –  Henk Holterman Jul 19 '10 at 9:58

Profiler will give you some ideas. Also, try to escape from linq

public static Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>> ComputeTimeSeries(Dictionary<double, double> timeStep, List<Point3D> dofs)
{
   var timeSeries = new Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>>();
   foreach(var keyValue in timeStep)
   {
      List<double> lst = new List<double>();
      foreach (Point3D point in dofs)
         lst.Add(point* keyValue.Value);

      timeSeries.Add(keyValue.Key, lst);  // the point3d*double operation is already being overloaded.
   }
   return timeSeries;
}
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I'm pretty sure that the above code is the bottleneck, any idea where else to profile? –  Graviton Jul 19 '10 at 9:56
1  
The code in the question has multiple parts, profiling is a good idea. –  Henk Holterman Jul 19 '10 at 10:00
2  
May be .ToList() is bottleneck or multiplication. –  Denis Palnitsky Jul 19 '10 at 10:00
    
Or any of the .Add() methods. –  Henk Holterman Jul 19 '10 at 10:06

I'm not a C# expert, but maybe the

dofs.Select(pt=>pt*keyValue.Value).ToList()

part could benefit from parallelization. Using SIMD instructions and/or threads, you could perform dofs[0] *= keyValue.Value and dofs[1] *= keyValue.Value etc. in parallel.

This code looks much like the first example given in the Optimize Managed Code For Multi-Core Machines article. So maybe you could rewrite the above to something like

Parallel.For(0, dofs.Length, delegate(int i) {
  dofs[i] *= keyValue.Value;
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm still stuck at .net 3.5, so all the cool PLINQ and TPL tricks probably won't help –  Graviton Jul 19 '10 at 9:55

If you could change the return value from Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>> to Dictionary<double, IEnumerable<Point3D>> you could postpone the actual calculation until it was needed.

You could remove the .ToList() and end up with the following:

public static Dictionary<double, IEnumerable<Point3D>> ComputeTimeSeries(Dictionary<double, double> timeStep, List<Point3D> dofs)
{
   var timeSeries = new Dictionary<double, List<Point3D>>();  
   foreach(var keyValue in timeStep)    
   {
      // the point3d*double operation is already being overloaded.
      timeSeries.Add(keyValue.Key, dofs.Select(pt=>pt*keyValue.Value));  
   } 
   return timeSeries; 
}

Now the calculations would be performed when you started to enumerate the values instead of inside the ComputeTimeSeries method. This would not make the compuations faster, but you would probably spread them out in time, possibly even across many threads.

share|improve this answer
    
But it would also mean that the calculation is done multiple times, if the enumeration is enumerated more than once. Besides: I doubt that the multiplication is the real bottleneck. For each multiplication, there are a couple of interface/delegate calls, which are much more expensive than a multiplication. –  nikie Jul 19 '10 at 10:21
    
That depends on how the series are used, but yeah. He would have to be aware of that. –  Rune Grimstad Jul 19 '10 at 10:59

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