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One problem bugged me enough to register on stackoverflow. Currently if I want to serialize Color to XML string as named color, or #rrggbb, or #aarrggbb, i do it like this:

[XmlIgnore()]
public Color color;

[XmlElement(ElementName = "Color")]
public String color_XmlSurrogate
{
  get { return MyColorConverter.SetColor(color); }
  set { MyColorConverter.GetColor(value); }
}

Here MyColorConverter does serialization just the way I like it. But all this feels like a kludge, with additional field and all. Is there a way to make it work in less lines, maybe connecting TypeDescriptor with C# attributes related to xml?

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I think you have reached the limits of XML serialization. You might want to look into DataContract serialization instead, –  leppie Jul 19 '10 at 10:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Here's something I'm using for serializing the Color struct in XML. It's better than shadowing the primary Color property in my opinion. Any suggestions welcome.

The XmlColor class relies primarily on the implicit operator language feature to provide the key data tranformations. Without this, the class is basically useless. Other bits of functionality were added to round out the class.

The XmlColor helper also provides a convenient way to separate color components. I added the Alpha property to show this. Notice the Alpha component won't be serialized if it's cranked all the way up to 255.

Deserializing the Web color value combines the Alpha value currently stored in the instance. The order in which the attributes are parsed shouldn't matter. If the Alpha attribute is missing in the XML source, the instance component value will be used to set the Alpha level. This is arguably faulty; however, in the case of XML serialization, the XmlColor class will initialized with Color.Black setting the Alpha to 255.

I'm working out of the VS2010 environment and building against .Net 4. I have no idea how compatible the code is with previous versions.

Here's an example property that should be serialized to XML:

    [XmlElement(Type=typeof(XmlColor))]
    public Color MyColor { get; set; }

Here's the XmlColor helper class:

public class XmlColor
{
    private Color color_ = Color.Black;

    public XmlColor() {}
    public XmlColor(Color c) { color_ = c; }


    public Color ToColor()
    {
        return color_;
    }

    public void FromColor(Color c)
    {
        color_ = c;
    }

    public static implicit operator Color(XmlColor x)
    {
        return x.ToColor();
    }

    public static implicit operator XmlColor(Color c)
    {
        return new XmlColor(c);
    }

    [XmlAttribute]
    public string Web
    {
        get { return ColorTranslator.ToHtml(color_); }
        set {
            try
            {
                if (Alpha == 0xFF) // preserve named color value if possible
                    color_ = ColorTranslator.FromHtml(value);
                else
                    color_ = Color.FromArgb(Alpha, ColorTranslator.FromHtml(value));
            }
            catch(Exception)
            {
                color_ = Color.Black;
            }
        }
    }

    [XmlAttribute]
    public byte Alpha
    {
        get { return color_.A; }
        set { 
            if (value != color_.A) // avoid hammering named color if no alpha change
                color_ = Color.FromArgb(value, color_); 
        }
    }

    public bool ShouldSerializeAlpha() { return Alpha < 0xFF; }
}
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1  
I like this! If it works, that is. I use VS2008 with .NET 3.5, so I would need to check this out some time in the future. Is there a reason to use ToColor/FromColor instead of some Color property? Can this be recoded to have just one xml string as serialized value? I would like this to be the result: <Color>#aarrggbb</Color> –  Dialecticus Dec 1 '10 at 10:44
2  
You could strip the class down to the implicit operators and a single publishable property. How that property gets serialized is totally up to you. I noticed calling on the Argb methods results in hex strings regardless of the alpha value. I chose XmlAttribute to avoid child elements. You might consider an "ARGB" XmlAttribute and coerce the 4 component hex strings by utilizing the Argb methods. No doubt you could squeeze in a Color property if you find it helpful. –  bvj Dec 3 '10 at 9:42
2  
@bvj, Too bad I can't give you a bounty for this one :) –  Andrey Dec 26 '11 at 12:45
    
+1 Lovely. Have a "Nice Answer" badge... :-) –  Neil Moss Jan 30 '13 at 18:14
1  
This is genius. Now I only have to add a [XmlElement(Type=typeof(XmlColor))] attribute on my code. Really the most elegant solution. –  Otiel Oct 13 '14 at 14:50

I believe below I have an easier solution to that. Color serialization is ignored and color is saved and loaded as simple 32-bit ARGB data.

[XmlIgnore]
public Color BackColor { get; set; }

[XmlElement("BackColor")]
public int BackColorAsArgb
{
    get { return BackColor.ToArgb();  }
    set { BackColor = Color.FromArgb(value); }
}
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3  
This solution still suffers from the problem that I wanted to avoid, which is surrogate property. –  Dialecticus Aug 24 '12 at 7:30

A pain, isn't it? That is all you can do with XmlSerializer, unless you implement IXmlSerializable (which I do not recommend). Options:

  • stick with that, but also mark color_XmlSurrogate as [Browsable(false), EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)] - that will stop it appearing in most data-binding views, and in the code-editor when referencing your assembly as a dll
  • use DataContractSerializer, which supports private properties (but which doesn't support xml attributes; you can't win...)

btw, I'd have color as a property, not a field:

[XmlIgnore]
public Color Color {get;set;}
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I have found another solution,

It is possible to use System.Windows.Media.Color instead of System.Drawing.Color.
It is serializable to XML.

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I tried it and for one color value I got several tags over which I have no control. That's no serialization the way I want it. –  Dialecticus Dec 26 '11 at 18:04
    
@Dialecticus, please explain. –  Andrey Dec 26 '11 at 21:46
    
for color (A=123, R=45, G=67, B=89) this is the result of serialization: <Color><A>123</A><R>45</R><G>67</G><B>89</B><ScA>0.482352942</ScA><ScR>0.026241‌​2224</ScR><ScG>0.0561284944</ScG><ScB>0.09989873</ScB></Color>. What I want as result is <Color>#7B2D4359</Color>. And besides, I really need GDI color, not media color, because that's the structure I'm working with. –  Dialecticus Dec 27 '11 at 9:49
    
@Dialecticus, Ok, I understand what you mean. But for some purposes it can be fine. –  Andrey Dec 27 '11 at 10:05

Since this is my first question here I decided to investigate it more. @bvj gave an excellent answer. I tweaked his code, so here it is. XmlColor class is changed so that the serialized string goes in text of the tag, and there are public static functions if string should be serialized as XML attribute instead of tag. Attributes unfortunately still must be serialized with surrogate fields, but please correct me if I'm wrong. Using the class:

// Color as tag
[XmlElement(Type = typeof(XmlColor))]
public Color ColorAsTag { get; set; }

// Color as attribute
[XmlIgnore]
public Color ColorAsAttribute { get; set; }

[XmlAttribute("ColorAsAttribute")]
public string ColorAsAttribute_XmlSurrogate
{
    get { return XmlColor.FromColor(ColorAsAttribute); }
    set { ColorAsAttribute = XmlColor.ToColor(value); }
}

The class that makes it happen:

public class XmlColor
{
    private Color color_ = Color.Black;

    public XmlColor() { }
    public XmlColor(Color c) { color_ = c; }


    public static implicit operator Color(XmlColor x)
    {
        return x.color_;
    }

    public static implicit operator XmlColor(Color c)
    {
        return new XmlColor(c);
    }

    public static string FromColor(Color color)
    {
        if (color.IsNamedColor)
            return color.Name;

        int colorValue = color.ToArgb();

        if (((uint)colorValue >> 24) == 0xFF)
            return String.Format("#{0:X6}", colorValue & 0x00FFFFFF);
        else
            return String.Format("#{0:X8}", colorValue);
    }

    public static Color ToColor(string value)
    {
        try
        {
            if (value[0] == '#')
            {
                return Color.FromArgb((value.Length <= 7 ? unchecked((int)0xFF000000) : 0) +
                    Int32.Parse(value.Substring(1), System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber));
            }
            else
            {
                return Color.FromName(value);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
        }

        return Color.Black;
    }

    [XmlText]
    public string Default
    {
        get { return FromColor(color_); }
        set { color_ = ToColor(value); }
    }
}
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