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i have a data structure like this

public class Employee
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<Employee> Employees { get; private set; }
    // ...
}

Now i need to loop through the complete structure and execute a method on each item.

How can i create an extension on IEnumerable for such a traverse function.

Wonderfull would be something like this

employeList.Traverse(e => Save(e), e.Employees.Count > 0);

Or is it impossible and i have to create a special method in my business logic?

Thanks a lot.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Do you mean an extension method on IEnumerable<Employee>? That's certainly feasible:

public static void Traverse(this IEnumerable<Employee> employees,
                            Action<Employee> action,
                            Func<Employee, bool> predicate)
{
    foreach (Employee employee in employees)
    {
        action(employee);
        // Recurse down to each employee's employees, etc.
        employee.Employees.Traverse(action, predicate);
    }
}

This has to be in a static, non-generic, non-nested class.

I'm not sure what the predicate bit is for, mind you...

EDIT: Here's the more generalised form I think you were looking for:

public static void Traverse<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items,
                               Action<T> action,
                               Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenProvider)
{
    foreach (T item in items)
    {
        action(item);
        Traverse<T>(childrenProvider(item), action, childrenProvider);
    }
}

You'd then call it with:

employees.Traverse(e => Save(e), e => e.Employees);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes thats what iam done. I try to build up a Extension for every IEnumerable (Enumerable<T>). but my problem is/was the loop over the childs (employee.Employees.Traverse) in the Extension. I first thought, i can create an Extension where i can put the "employee.employee" call from the calling (as lambda or something else). –  Khh Jul 19 '10 at 13:48
    
@k-hoffman: I've edited my answer to show that approach. –  Jon Skeet Jul 19 '10 at 13:51
    
yes, wonderfull. great. thanks a lot –  Khh Jul 19 '10 at 17:55

I'm assuming your main class should be Employer rather than Employee.

public static class EmployerExtensions
{
    public static void Traverse(this Employer employer, Action<Employee> action)
    {
        // check employer and action for null and throw if they are

        foreach (var employee in employer.Employees)
        {
            action(employee);
        }
    }
}
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I'm not sure what your parameters are supposed to signify, but if the second parameter is a predicate, you may want to do something like this:

public static void Traverse(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action<T> action, Func<T,bool> predicate) {
   foreach(T item in source.Where(predicate)) {
      action.Invoke(item);
   }
}

I might also throw in that there already is such a function, on List<T>, so if ToList is not an issue, you would be able to do

employeList.Where(e => e.Employees.Count > 0).ToList().ForEach(Save);
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You can do it with a simple extension method:

employeeList.ForEach(e => Save(e));

public static partial class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Executes an <see cref="Action&lt;T&gt;"/> on each item in a sequence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the elements of <paramref name="source"/>.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">An <see cref="IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;"/> in which each item should be processed.</param>
    /// <param name="action">The <see cref="Action&lt;T&gt;"/> to be performed on each item in the sequence.</param>
    public static void ForEach<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Action<T> action
        )
    {
        if (source == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (action == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

        foreach (T item in source)
            action(item);
    }
}
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While passing an Action might be useful, it isn't as flexible as an iterator that enumerates all items in a tree structure, making them available for use with other LINQ operators:

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    // Enumerate all descendants of the argument,
    // but not the argument itself:

    public static IEnumerable<T> Traverse<T>( this T item, 
                                     Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> selector )
    {
        return Traverse<T>( selector( item ), selector );
    }

    // Enumerate each item in the argument and all descendants:

    public static IEnumerable<T> Traverse<T>( this IEnumerable<T> items, 
                                        Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> selector )
    {
        if( items != null )
        {
            foreach( T item in items )
            {
                yield return item;
                foreach( T child in Traverse<T>( selector( item ), selector ) )
                    yield return child;
            }
        }
    }
}           

// Example using System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode:

TreeNode root = myTreeView.Nodes[0];

foreach( string text in root.Traverse( n => n.Nodes ).Select( n => n.Text ) )
   Console.WriteLine( text );

// Sometimes we also need to enumerate parent nodes
//
// This method enumerates the items in any "implied"
// sequence, where each item can be used to deduce the
// next item in the sequence (items must be class types
// and the selector returns null to signal the end of
// the sequence):

public static IEnumerable<T> Walk<T>( this T start, Func<T, T> selector )
    where T: class
{
    return Walk<T>( start, true, selector )
}

// if withStart is true, the start argument is the 
// first enumerated item in the sequence, otherwise 
// the start argument item is not enumerated:

public static IEnumerable<T> Walk<T>( this T start, 
                                      bool withStart, 
                                      Func<T, T> selector )
    where T: class
{
    if( start == null )
        throw new ArgumentNullException( "start" );
    if( selector == null )
        throw new ArgumentNullException( "selector" );

    T item = withStart ? start : selector( start );
    while( item != null )
    {
        yield return item;
        item = selector( item );
    }
}

// Example: Generate a "breadcrumb bar"-style string
// showing the path to the currently selected TreeNode
// e.g., "Parent > Child > Grandchild":

TreeNode node = myTreeView.SelectedNode;

var text = node.Walk( n => n.Parent ).Select( n => n.Text );

string breadcrumbText = string.Join( " > ", text.Reverse() );
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